Posts Tagged ‘Employee Management’


How to Encourage Your Employees to Adopt New Technology Solutions

Most people are averse to change. If employees are accustomed to using a certain technology or process, it can be difficult for them to accept a new solution.  Whenever a new technology is implemented, business owners should expect pushback and have a plan ready to overcome it.  Here are some simple steps you can take to prepare your employees for a new technology implementation: 

  1. Communicate the Benefits

Perhaps the most important part of introducing a new workplace solution is explaining why you are doing so.  Focus on the positives; share with employees the new perks, efficiency, convenience, etc. that they will benefit from after the implementation is complete.  For example, if adopting your business is switching to a VoIP system, such as Nextiva’s, you can focus on the increased reliability, time-saving features, and lower cost to the company.  If you have done your research and chosen a solution that is an improvement over the previous one, it shouldn’t be too hard to deflect objections and help your employees understand why this is a change for the better.

  1. Provide Realistic Expectations

It is unfair to expect your entire company to switch to a new system and learn all the features in one day.  There should be a transitional period for everyone to grow accustomed to the new system and become comfortable with everything.  Following the Nextiva VoIP example, it should be fairly simple to train everyone on how to make and receive phone calls in one day, but it may be a bit more difficult for everyone to learn the star codes and embrace new features, such as call parking.  Offer a timeline for learning so that nobody feels rushed.

  1. Designate Practice Time

If employees have to use the system for the first time during their normal work activities, they may feel flustered.  They also may not want to spend time learning a new solution when they can be working on ongoing projects.  To avoid this common source of tension and stress, provide a designated time for employees to test out the new system.  An hour or two set aside on one day can be enough depending on the complexity of the technology.  Allow your staff to openly explore the features and learn what they can through experimentation under low-stress conditions.  They can help each other, ask for assistance, and get a handle on using the program before being in a higher-stakes environment.

  1. Offer Support

Instructions and help should be easily accessible to everyone who will be using the new system.  In most cases, the company providing the new service should have some of these resources available.  For example, Nextiva offers a Customer Support Center with written explanations and videos for common questions, along with a dedicated Support line you can call to speak to a technical specialist.  Your company may want to provide more resources, however, so it could be beneficial to have a few experts on your team.  These experts will then be available to train individuals seeking more assistance and answer questions on site.   

  1. Allow Feedback

Employees want to know that their opinions are valid and sought after by their company.  Encourage feedback on the new system so your employees know their thoughts and feelings are valued and taken into consideration.  Gaining feedback is also beneficial for identifying areas that may be problematic in a new system, where training needs to be conducted, and just the general feeling from employees.  It is important to keep your staff happy, so take their feedback and suggestions to heart, and make the new solution a positive change for everyone!

Adopting new workplace solutions can be a hurdle, but with proper training and explanation, it should be simple to keep your workforce happy.


Why Your Email Signature Matters

The single marketing message that any business person sends the most every day is in their email signature. This is why it is critical to use only the information that reflects the company’s brand and further builds a relationship with the recipient.

The essentials

Name, title, company, email address, web site URL, phone number and social media links where you are active. Include your email address since many times it is not included in the header of the reply.

Forget these closing salutations

I am not a fan of legal disclosures since it adds unnecessary length to the email especially since it  probably will be opened on a smart phone. I question the legal effectiveness even if these are used. I also do not believe in using motivational sayings unless it is part of your brand.

Stay away from silly closing salutations like “Blue skies” or “Cheers”. Now I am not an ogre, but these are not always appropriate. Consider that you just told someone in an email they did not get the job and then close with “Cheers”. This does not help your ongoing reputation or brand. I am also not sure what “Regards” means. Is this “Best regards” or “Kind Regards”? I also don’t like “Sincerely” because it always seems patronizing. Also forget “Reach for the Stars”, “Peace Out”, “Your Boy”, “Your Girl”, or “Your Compatriot”.

Use these closing salutations

Think of something that is more closely tied to your brand. I use “here’s to getting unstuck and moving…forward”. If a branded one does not work, use old standbys like “Hope this helps”, “Thank You”, “Much Appreciated”, “Let me know where I can help”

Other email signatures that work

  • The brand tag line with a link to more explanation like a video
  • Use a company logo or a very small photo
  • “Here is recent recognition we received! Thank you!” with a link
  • “Come see us at _______________ (upcoming event)” with a link
  • “We are growing! Know someone that would make a good ___________ for our company”
  • “We were recently honored to be featured in _______________” with a link

Remember, the email signature should be changed no more than every quarter so it can make multiple impressions on the recipients.

Overall, keep it short and in plain text with no animations (except for a photo or logo). Remember, most will be opened on a mobile device. Test out what looks good on various devices, but also on different web browsers and on Gmail and Yahoo mail.

What is in your email signature?


4 Ways to Decide if You Should Re-hire Former Employees

There was a time when few individuals would consider taking a new job with a former employee and few companies would consider re-hiring former employees. Things have changed. When the economic downturn forced employers to cut back on headcount, they had to reluctantly let go of many valued workers. Even in today's somewhat tepid recovery, those same businesses now need to ramp up to meet increasing customer demand. It's natural to consider re-hiring individuals who worked for you in the past (known as "boomerang" employees).

Regardless of whether employees originally resigned or if you made the decision to let them go, re-hiring someone who knows your company culture can have merit in many situations. To some degree, you can trust your gut when making this decision. Still, taking a consistent, analytical approach can help improve the outcome. Here are four things to consider when you try to assess if a boomerang will come back to save you — or smack you in the head.

1. Assess the Reasons Behind the Original Separation

At some point in their lives, most people make mistakes. But, as Winston Churchill said, "To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often." In other words, the people you laid off two years ago because they displayed poor judgment in their work may have learned from their mistakes. They may, in fact, have become exactly the employees you need now. And, the same holds true in reverse; if they initially left voluntarily with complaints about the company, changes to themselves or to your company can make conditions ideal for a second try.

So, regardless of who initiated the original exit, don't say "no” without considering the underlying reasons. Give boomerang applicants the opportunity to explain what they learned — and how you can benefit from their return to your company

2. Understand that Previous Company Experience May or May Not Help

Re-hiring former employees has some natural advantages. They're easy to find for recruitment purposes, they already know many associates and they understand the company culture. For many boomerang employees, onboarding is not required; they hit the ground running on the first day of re-employment.

On the other hand, things may have changed in your business since they last worked for you. Of course, those things may actually make your company more attractive when they take a second look. And, don't forget that boomerang employees also go through changes after their initial exit. Did experience from prior jobs make them even more valuable than they were originally? Or, did they witness a miraculous world of employment in the outside world that your small business can never hope to match? Only open and honest interview discussions can help you and the applicant predict the likelihood of future success.

3. Consider the Effects on Co-Worker Morale

Unless your business is small enough to employ just a handful of people, it can be difficult to predict whether or not your existing workforce will greet a boomerang employee with a hearty welcome, a mistrustful shun, or something in between.

The anticipated reaction of other employees is certainly no reason to avoid re-hiring a former worker, but it is most definitely a reason to avoid blindsiding your current staff. It's up to you whether you want to involve them in this hiring decision, but you definitely need to make them aware of the situation — and what you expect them to do (and not do) once the employee begins work.

4. Examine if the Re-hire Really is the Best Candidate

"Better the devil you know" should not be a reason to re-hire a former employee any more than making the choice simply to save time and effort. Granted, there will be occasions when a boomerang candidate offers advantages that you know you cannot duplicate if you hire anyone else. But, under normal circumstances, you should seriously consider talking to talented outside candidates, as well. Even if you have to spend more time onboarding an outsider, that individual might have a better skill set — without potentially higher salary expectations.

The second time might be the charm.

Some argue that a skills gap is preventing U.S. companies from finding suitable new employees. If this is true, it can be tempting to turn to people you know when jobs become available in your company. Whether the employee left out of economic considerations or if either of you was not satisfied the first time around, a re-hire can be a boom or bust. By carefully looking at both sides of all of the issues, you can help ensure that boomerangs meet or exceed expectations, rather than hitting you in the head —for a second time.


Are You Pickier Than Your Pickiest Customer? (You Should Be)

12-31 Picky Eater smallIt’s time for you to stop cutting your business a break, to stop letting things slide. If you want to improve as a business, learn to out-picky your pickiest customer. Try putting on your pickiest view of the world, and force-fit this filter onto your employees’ eyes as well.

Let’s try out this pickier-than-the-pickiest-customer view of the world with a look at the very simple, often ambiguous behavior that one of your employees might exhibit. For example, you could be watching, through your new grump-tinted glasses, one of your clerks coming out from behind the checkout counter chewing on her last bite of a ham and cheese sandwich.

 Your employee makes her way to the register, swallows the last bite of her sandwich, and says, “May I help you?” to the customer waiting at the counter.  Not an uncommon behavior and something most of us have seen at some time or other in our life as customers (people gotta eat, right?)

Now that you’ve watched this scene unfold, take your employee aside and ask her to describe what the customer at the register thought of the interaction, including the not-quite-finished sandwich with which it started.  Your employee will usually ascribe the mindset of someone like her own sweet grandmother to the customer; she’ll hear in her mind’s eye the customer thinking “Oh, that poor dear. She missed her dinner and had to eat standing up. She rushed right back to work after taking only five minutes of her lunch break. She’s so dedicated.”

This, my friend, is one of those big ole teachable moments: If you take this opportunity to ask your staff member to look at her own behavior as your pickiest customer would see it, you help her understand how her behavior actually appears to some customers. Because your pickiest customer would interpret the sales clerk who comes out to the register chewing the last bite of her sandwich more like the following: (with dripping sarcasm): “Oh, how nice! You have time to sit back there and have a leisurely lunch while I’m standing in the line for 20 minutes waiting for you to get off your backside and come help me. I’m soooo sorry to have bothered you – no – you go back and finish up while I stand here, at your leisure, just waiting to give you my money. Don’t worry about me or anyone else dying here in line…”

Needless to say, this is a very different interpretation – but it’s the one that will help you grow as service providers and as a business entity.

If you teach yourself, and your staff, to view their service behaviors as would a customer who’s a hypersensitive, hypercritical crank, your staff and you will begin to see flaws in the customer experience and any number of inanities that you’d otherwise miss. Let’s say you manage a restaurant and catch a busser in the following behavior:  He sees a half-empty glass of ice water and says to the guest, “Would you care for some more water?” It’s a pretty innocuous service gesture, and intended to be helpful. However, viewed through the eyes of your pickiest customer, the response might be something like, “No, don’t bother – let me die of thirst” or “what do you need, an engraved invitation – it’s just ice water” or “Excuse me, I was talking!”

Viewed through this lens, you can help your employee reevaluate whether or not he should continue to interrogate guests on their refill needs, rather than just pouring it without a word and moving away from the table.  


The Top 3 Ways to Improve Your Company’s Culture

Attracting top talent to your business is now more competitive than ever. Gone are the days of focusing only on compensation as your company’s main differentiating factor. Today’s workforce wants more than just a nice paycheck, especially when it comes to Millennials. Now people want to work for a company that shows appreciation for its employees in more ways then just money, provides advancement opportunities, has an inviting and fun work environment, and who’s mission and culture aligns with their values.

At Nextiva, we’ve found there are three ways you can improve your company culture to increase the overall happiness of your employees. And as any business owner or team leader knows, if you’re employees are happy, they’re more efficient, productive, and innovative.

1. Open communication between employees and management

To have truly open communication, your team must feel like their thoughts, opinions, and concerns are heard. This starts with creating a company culture that is void of egos and focused on two-way communication—talking and listening. Also, trust is a large part of the equation that takes time to establish, but if you stay consistent, it can be done. Trust is built from listening, following through on the things you said you would take action on, and creating an environment where employees feel supported. Fostering a culture that values everyone’s unique ideas can lead to amazing business advancement and growth. You never know who may have a great idea to improve a process, product or service, so stay open minded and listen to your employees.

OCEO Appreciation Day

2. Show your appreciation

This cannot be reiterated enough. Positive reinforcement will do wonders for individual and company-wide moral. If you show your employees appreciation on an individual and group basis, they’ll be more productive, happier and more likely to grow their career with your company.

Showing appreciation and recognition makes people feel valued, and they’re more willing to go the extra mile for you and your business. You don’t need to offer extravagant prizes to show appreciation. We’ve found that things such as a coveted parking spot, an extra vacation day, free lunch, etc. all make a big impact.

Additionally, we focus on initiatives and events that highlight individuals, teams, and departments. For example, our dedicated Culture team plans appreciation days throughout the year for each department, and once a year we highlight five individuals at our company event that made a positive impact on our culture and company. These awards are a huge honor and voted on by the management team. Also, team members are encouraged to give shout-outs to employees who go above and beyond for others in the company on an ongoing basis.

10-8 Nextiva Company Culture

3. Create career paths and advancement opportunities

No matter the size of your business, you can create career paths and advancement opportunities for your team. If you don’t give your team something to strive for, whether it is a raise, promotion, continuing education opportunities, or other means of advancing their career and improving skill-set, they’re going to look for a company that does offer these benefits.

Just as an athletic team works hard so they can win a game, your employees are also working hard towards their own individual goals. This aspect of your company culture is a direct result of creating an environment that promotes open communication and shows appreciation for its employees. Check in with your employees on an ongoing basis and ask what they’re interested in and the direction they’d like their career to go in your organization. From there, work on creating a development plan and projects that will help them acquire the skills and experience they need to get to the next level. This will not only benefit them, but the company overall.

Top Salesperson

Building a good company culture doesn’t happen overnight….

Building a strong company culture takes a lot of time, effort and consistency from all levels of the organization. Also, focus on fostering an environment that is in line with your companies mission and values. What works for one company may be not be feasible for another, but the three areas listed above—open communication, appreciation, and advancement opportunities—are universal to all organizations. How you execute this is up to you, but we guarantee it will improve the work environment, increase your team’s productivity, and ultimately help your business grow.


Mondays with Mike: 8 Ways To Keep Employees From Wasting Your Time

Though I’m on the road a lot, I love the days when I work from my office.  I get so much from my staff – inspiration, constructive criticism, and an excitement that only comes from pulling together to accomplish great things.  But we all know that putting people together in a workspace often leads to serious time black holes – conflicts, gossip, and confusion that eat away at productivity.  Here are my eight tips for keeping you and your staff on track:

  1. Institute a daily huddle.  I run my daily huddle standing up.  People don’t settle in with a cup of coffee and notepad for doodling.  I cover the day’s objectives and challenges, and we get right back to work.  It’s not a gab session, and it’s not interactive.  I transmit critical information to keep us on the same page, and we get right back to work.
  2. Maintain 360 communication.  Though I don’t use my huddle for gathering information from my staff, keeping lines of communication open is critical for eliminating confusion.  Sometimes I’m the problem; if I haven’t clearly delineated responsibilities and goals, I need one of my staff to let me know what needs clarification.  Keep your door and your ears open.
  3. Manage conflict.  Conflict is inevitable.  You can’t avoid it altogether, which means you must actively manage it.  Watch for inner-office rivalries and disagreements and step in to diplomatically resolve conflict when it’s necessary.  Ignoring problems can result in bigger blowups later on.
  4. Eliminate chronic problems.  The 80-20 rule holds true when it comes to problem staff:  80 percent of your problems are caused by 20 percent of your staff.  Warn and then weed out the folks disrupting your company’s progress.
  5. Trust your staff.  If you realize you’re dealing with a mountain of questions from staff who are afraid of making the wrong move, then it could be the stakes are too high.  You have to realize that mistakes will occur, and you will benefit from creating a climate in which your employees learn when it’s okay to take a chance.
  6. Get the right people doing the right things the right way.  We all have strengths and weaknesses, and taking a step back to observe how your office runs can highlight staff members who aren’t in their ideal positions.  Shuffling responsibilities can make your company far more efficient.
  7. Give your staff the pride of ownership.  If your employees see a personal benefit from improving the bottom line, they’re far more likely to give it their all.  Profit sharing and phantom equity can be powerful motivators.  You can also include an update on the company’s health as part of your daily huddle to keep your staff focused on the ultimate mutual goal.
  8. Praise your staff publicly.  Not only do you want to reinforce the good behavior of your stellar staff members, but you also want to make sure you’re not spending time publicly addressing undesirable behavior.  Praise in public, and chastise in private.  Great work earns your staff recognition and a sense of satisfaction.

Finally, here’s a bonus tip: make your workplace fun.  Now, don’t get me wrong:  We work hard, and in fact I’ve instituted library hours in the office – chunks of time when it’s all business and we work quietly.  But during break time, you might walk in on a nerf gun battle or trashcan basketball.  We work hard, and we take the time to blow off steam so we can focus better when we return to our desks.


4 Tips on Mentoring Employees for Everyone’s Benefit

Without inspiration from a former boss, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos might not be where he is today. In a mutual mentorship, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg turns to Washington Post CEO Donald Graham for advice on being a CEO; Graham turns to Zuckerberg for social media advice. But effective mentorship does not have to apply only to top brass. Nor does the mentoring relationship have to be formal or all-consuming — and the best partnerships are mutually-beneficial.

Here are four tips to help you learn the essentials of mentoring and how to do it for mutual benefit.

1. Mentor/Mentee Matches Often Begin Informally

Mentorships often begin when you offer a bit of advice to someone or when a person comes to you for advice. Whether a co-worker approaches you to learn your secret to handling difficult customers or you offer shortcut tips to a local print shop owner to improve scheduling, you are a mentor.

In fact, those few minutes may mark the entire mentor relationship. But, it may also mark the beginning of a long-term mentorship.

2. Scout for Likely Candidates

The ability to promote from within an organization is valuable, whether you run a small business or manage a department within a multi-national conglomerate. Why seek outside candidates when you have promising employees that already have experience with the company processes and culture? The key is to identify the employees that show promise for advancement.

If you are a small business owner, you probably already know the potential of your staff. Managers at large companies, on the other hand, do not have intimate knowledge of all of the people around them. If you are a large-company manager, you might suggest company-arranged (and funded) lunches to help spot the up-and-comers. These are the people who think beyond their job descriptions. They may regularly come up with money-saving ideas and they generally recognize that departments outside their own are affected by every decision. Their ideas consider this big picture.

3. Understand the Difference Between Mentoring and Training

Mentors help develop people into their best selves by guiding them to capitalize on their own abilities and attitudes. So, while you would train a person to follow steps 1, 2 and 3, you might mentor employees to make decisions by requiring them to practice their reasoning abilities.

Have you ever felt frustrated when someone answers a question with a question? This is known as the Socratic Method and it is very appropriate in mentoring. When a mentee asks how to handle two employees that need the same resources to meet identical deadlines, for example, this is the time to ask some questions. Are the deadlines equally important? What are the consequences of missing each deadline? Are there ways to share the resources? Do not tell mentees what you would do; teach them to think it out for themselves. This is the difference between mentoring and training.

Training develops a skill set — bookkeepers learn where to put the debits and credits, sales people learn the details of the product line, and everyone learns where paperwork goes for processing. Good mentors may recommend additional training, but great mentors might wait until their mentees recognize that they need training — and ask for it.

4. Know What's in it For You

Mentorship relationships are beneficial to mentors, too. If you are a work-overloaded manager, a talented mentee can take some of the load off, even freeing you up to better focus on high-level tasks. You also gain the loyalty of someone who is likely to help you in some important way in the future.

Still, if your company requires you to take someone under your wing, it is important to be clear on the benefits that you will receive. Will you receive monetary compensation if the mentorship creates more work? Or, will your mentoring efforts make it possible for you to move up the ladder while you groom your replacement? You might undertake an informal, short-term mentorship purely for altruistic reasons, but it is reasonable (and necessary) to expect more from a formal relationship.

Mentors Need Mentors, Too

You have many abilities to pass on to promising employees — particularly if you want to retain them over the long term. But don't forget that mentors need mentors, too — even the top gun. If you own a business or run a large organization, recognize that there is a vast array of resources outside of your company doors. As you network with other business owners or executives, don't be afraid to ask for advice to help you further your short- or long-term goals. And, don't be afraid to offer advice, either.


How to Retain Talented Employees In Your Small Business

9-23 Retail employees smallIn your business, your team is everything. Even if you follow the guidelines from my blog on how to hire your first employee on the best practices for hiring and interviewing candidates, some bad seeds will still find ways to slip through the cracks. It’s not just poor workers who will affect how your team pool changes. Millenials, who comprise the largest generation currently working, have exhibited a trend of job-hopping in search of the best job with the highest compensation. The goal for you, as a small business owner, is to prevent your most talented employees from jumping ship. Here are some tips for how to retain your best and brightest employees.

1. Think Long-Term

If it’s financially impossible to increase an employee’s compensation, you need to remind him/her that one day it will be. Be sure that all of your employees have a concrete idea of what your vision is for your business and what role they’ll play in helping your get there. Make them understand why you do what you do. If you voice how much you believe in yourself and your team, the desire to stay working for you and helping you reach that goal will follow. If you treat your employees well, they’ll trust you enough to know that when you become successful, so will they.

2. Compensate Fairly

Depending on the skill and education levels you require for your position, compensation will play a large role in obtaining and keeping talented people in your circle. A paycheck and its accompanying benefits are a huge factor when workers consider leaving for another employer. Do you offer health benefits, a retirement package or an annual review during which good work is rewarded with a raise? You should consider all of these things and figure out compensation that is fair to keep you best employees

3. Give Perks

While small business owners have the desire to compensate employees very well, we all know money can get in the way. If you can’t financially afford to pay your employees exactly what they deserve, figure out what else you can do to balance the scale. Sculpt a laidback, but professional, work culture where creativity and inter-office friendships are encouraged. Offer paid vacations and sick days, maternity and paternity leave or the use of your equipment for an employee’s side project. Time is free, and if you feel that your employees might deserve more than what they see in their paychecks, there’s no harm in offering other benefits to them.

4. Offer Growth Opportunities

Talented employees are people who crave responsibility and growth. If you’re sure an employee is someone you want to keep on your team, offer him/her the opportunity to take on more challenging and engaging work. This will keep your employee interested while also preventing the job from becoming mundane or predictable. Keep your talented employees on their toes with more demands. They will see and feel the trust and faith you have in them.

You need your employees and they need you too. You will run across your fair share of bad employees during your time as an entrepreneur, but when you begin adding really valuable, talented employees to your team you need to know how to hold on them. It will be the best thing you can do for your business.


Seven Steps Toward Customer-Focused Culture Change

Changing the culture at your company isn’t easy (It’s not that it’s necessarily complicated, it’s just an awful lot of work). But culture change done right can transform your company into a customer-centric and employee-embracing company. Here are seven steps that will help get you there.

  1. Make the decision.  If you don’t make the decision to drive cultural change at your company, make it loudly, proudly, and in a way that’s hard to turn back from, it’s not going to happen.
  2. Spell it out. Take a very, very few words–really, just a handful!–to say what your decision looks like. For example Mayo Clinic’s “The needs of the patient comes first.”  Seven words, none of them consultantese, only one of them longer than a syllable.  If you need more words than this, that’s OK.  The Ritz-Carlton not only has the timeless “We are ladies and gentlement serving ladies and gentlemen” but also “The Ritz-Carlton Hotel is a place where the genuine care and comfort of our guests is our highest mission.
  3. Start talking about the change at every orientation. If you waste orientation talking about the employee fridge and how it’s emptied out on Fridays, how to file for vacation time or sick leave and such, you’re blowing it.  Orientation is a time when employees are (ironically), disoriented, and as such it’s a crucial time to have someone at the very highest level in the organization (at the Ritz-Carlton it’s the CEO, every time a new hotel opens; at Danny Meyer’s restaurants it’s Danny Meyer) talk about what is central and immutable in the organization’s culture.  Its purpose, in other words.
  4. Overhaul your hiring and personnel practices. Every single employee, from this moment forward, needs to be hired for reasons that are congruent with your newly stated values.  This is very, very important. And as far as personnel policies, no more docking people for coming in late from the lunch break to assist a customer they found in distress.  No more ranking based on average handle time on phone calls.  And so forth.  The CEO can make the highest of high-minded values statements, but here is where the rubber hits the road, where your culture can be supported or sabotaged
  5. Standardize (in the right way). Everything that can reasonably be expected to occur between you and your customers deserves to be standardized, explaining (to your employees) both what to do and the reason behind the suggested behavior (so that they can deviate from it when the situation calls for a different approach)
  6. Commit yourself to employee empowerment, including employee-directed job design. Jobs should not by default be considered activities that are done by employees but designed by their so-called superiors.  While, of course, to some extent this has to be true, especially in life-threatening situations–your employee can lead an evacuation down a fire escape but can't necessarily design standards for what is an acceptable or unacceptable level of smoke inhalation–it's important to simultaneously push against it, to let your employees know what they need to get done but not necessarily how they should go about designing their day and carrying out their duties.
  7. Keep the momentum going. Ongoing reinforcement is crucial.  Consider how the Ritz-Carlton has maintained its culture for decades, even in the face of leadership changes and some very challenging economic times.  The centerpiece is daily lineup approach:  a few minutes every day discussing just one of your list of cultural values or service standards, with the meeting led by a different employee every time. The result, added up over a year or years, is a lot of reinforcement. And it makes every single one of those days of that year or years better on its own.



 
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