Archive for the ‘Customer Service’ Category


Six improvements to make in your customer service experience (that you can begin today)

Here are six areas of your customer service experience that may be ripe for a review and overhaul: areas where you may be able to make a significant improvement due to their importance and how often these areas are overlooked in many businesses.

1.      Become scientific–and traits-based– in your hiring. The reality is that not everyone is cut out to work face to face (or phone to phone, or terminal to terminal) with employees. For success with customers, hiring needs to be a scientific process.  Hiring on a hunch is deadly, and — quite often — discriminatory.  So: Hire to a profile, study your results, revise your profile, and keep at it.  (For a shortcut to get you started, use my acronym WETCO as your rule of thumb for the five traits most crucial in employees with frequent customer contact:  Warmth, Empathy, Teamwork, Conscientiousness, and Optimism. )  

2.     Reinforce your customer excellence standards daily. The very best organizations talk about the importance of customer service every single day, every single shift.  The Ritz-Carlton has been doing this since the 1980’s and they don’t miss a single shift.

3.     Pay special attention to the two parts of the service experience that are most memorable to a customer: the beginning and the end of the customer’s interaction with you. Also: be sure to recognize that the beginning starts before the beginning”—that customers are picking up info and implications about you before they ever arrive at your official website or the front door of your establishment.

4.     It’s crucial that you have a customer service recovery process in place for when things go south. It doesn’t work to wing it every time a customer is irritated, frustrated, or flat-out furious. No matter how superb your product or service is, every company needs a service recovery process with the goal of restoring (or even enhancing) customer satisfaction, as well as reducing the possibility of a recurrence.

5.     Be as timely as your customers expect you to be: A perfect product, or perfect customer service, delivered late, is a defect. Being late or misleading about timetables, being insensitive to the timing issues and pacing preferences and expectations of your customers, is problematic.  Great institutions are doing everything possible these days to adjust themselves to the customer’s perception of time: this includes self-service options for project tracking (for example, USAA Insurance allows you to see the progress of your insurance claim online, 24/7), flexibility on delivery times, guaranteed times for menu items in fast casual restaurants, and more.

6.     Strive to see, taste, feel and even smell your company the way your customers do? You can learn a lot by parking where your customers park, entering via the same entrance your customers use, calling in on the same phone lines and using the same retail website and perhaps-laborious login routine you make your customers go through. You learn a lot this way. If you use reserved parking and the employee entrance and your intranet, or–worse–spend the day holed up in your office, you won’t.  You’ll, tragically, find out about your company’s problems on Yelp rather than from your own eyes.


Tuesday Tip: Lessons From the Number-One Customer Service Retailer

What can your small business learn from the best of the best? StellaService’s list of the online retailers with the best customer service is out, and for the second quarter in a row, L.L. Bean is the top-rated company. L.L. Bean ranked in the top 10 for four out of five customer service areas that StellaService ranks: phone, email, chat and returns.

Apparently, speed is of the essence when it comes to customer service. When calling by phone, StellaService analysts were able to connect to a live L.L. Bean customer service representative in less than 30 seconds. When emailing, analysts received responses from Bean reps in slightly over an hour on average.

That's a huge advantage, considering that just 10 percent of companies in L.L. Bean’s industry connect callers to reps in the same timeframe; at three out of 10 companies, it takes more than two minutes to reach a live person by phone. And when it comes to email, four out of 10 companies took more than 12 hours to respond.

How to ensure your company responds quickly to customer service contacts:

  • Staff adequately. Reviewing historical sales trends will help you identify periods when you're likely to need more customer service reps due to higher than average sales.
  • Watch weather. If delivery of your company’s product or service is likely to be affected by severe weather, keep an eye on forecasts 10 days out so you can staff and prepare accordingly. It is also smart to have a backup plan for what you'll do if your own location is affected. Can your customer service reps work remotely? That way, you won't face the double whammy of angry customers and a short-staffed customer service department. Using cloud-based communications makes it easy to handle customer service calls, no matter where your reps are.
  • Take advantage of technology. Features like auto-attendants, greetings, and announcements guide callers to the correct department. Routing and queue delivery systems can also be used to ensure that callers don't wait too long on hold. With the right technology, you can even prioritize calls on hold to make sure they get answered quickly.
  • Set goals and track results. If your call hold times are currently unacceptable, set realistic goals for improvement. Reward customer service reps for attaining these benchmarks, then continue to challenge them with higher standards while still enabling them to deliver great service.
  • Consider implementing live chat. StellaService reports that in 2015, 16 major retailers added live chat to their websites, while four major retailers stopped offering customer service support via email. Live chat offers faster response times than email, which keeps customers happy. In addition, chat enables you to provide proactive customer service by answering customer questions before the sale is ever made.

Take these steps, and you just might find your customer service topping your customers’ personal “best” lists.

 


Are You Pickier Than Your Pickiest Customer? (You Should Be)

12-31 Picky Eater smallIt’s time for you to stop cutting your business a break, to stop letting things slide. If you want to improve as a business, learn to out-picky your pickiest customer. Try putting on your pickiest view of the world, and force-fit this filter onto your employees’ eyes as well.

Let’s try out this pickier-than-the-pickiest-customer view of the world with a look at the very simple, often ambiguous behavior that one of your employees might exhibit. For example, you could be watching, through your new grump-tinted glasses, one of your clerks coming out from behind the checkout counter chewing on her last bite of a ham and cheese sandwich.

 Your employee makes her way to the register, swallows the last bite of her sandwich, and says, “May I help you?” to the customer waiting at the counter.  Not an uncommon behavior and something most of us have seen at some time or other in our life as customers (people gotta eat, right?)

Now that you’ve watched this scene unfold, take your employee aside and ask her to describe what the customer at the register thought of the interaction, including the not-quite-finished sandwich with which it started.  Your employee will usually ascribe the mindset of someone like her own sweet grandmother to the customer; she’ll hear in her mind’s eye the customer thinking “Oh, that poor dear. She missed her dinner and had to eat standing up. She rushed right back to work after taking only five minutes of her lunch break. She’s so dedicated.”

This, my friend, is one of those big ole teachable moments: If you take this opportunity to ask your staff member to look at her own behavior as your pickiest customer would see it, you help her understand how her behavior actually appears to some customers. Because your pickiest customer would interpret the sales clerk who comes out to the register chewing the last bite of her sandwich more like the following: (with dripping sarcasm): “Oh, how nice! You have time to sit back there and have a leisurely lunch while I’m standing in the line for 20 minutes waiting for you to get off your backside and come help me. I’m soooo sorry to have bothered you – no – you go back and finish up while I stand here, at your leisure, just waiting to give you my money. Don’t worry about me or anyone else dying here in line…”

Needless to say, this is a very different interpretation – but it’s the one that will help you grow as service providers and as a business entity.

If you teach yourself, and your staff, to view their service behaviors as would a customer who’s a hypersensitive, hypercritical crank, your staff and you will begin to see flaws in the customer experience and any number of inanities that you’d otherwise miss. Let’s say you manage a restaurant and catch a busser in the following behavior:  He sees a half-empty glass of ice water and says to the guest, “Would you care for some more water?” It’s a pretty innocuous service gesture, and intended to be helpful. However, viewed through the eyes of your pickiest customer, the response might be something like, “No, don’t bother – let me die of thirst” or “what do you need, an engraved invitation – it’s just ice water” or “Excuse me, I was talking!”

Viewed through this lens, you can help your employee reevaluate whether or not he should continue to interrogate guests on their refill needs, rather than just pouring it without a word and moving away from the table.  


Customer Service is the New Marketing (it’s even better than the old kind).

Customer service is the new marketing.  And it's even more powerful than the old kind.  Here’s what I mean: Once upon a time, you could guarantee success for your product or service if you just slathered on the mass-marketing real thick. You could hire a real-life version of Don Draper or Peggy Olson and have them add that that coating of marketing magic to the product or service you wanted to sell.

It didn’t matter so much if your washing machines weren’t reliable; what mattered was that the marketers working for you had dazzled the buying public with a brilliant mascot like the lonely Maytag repairman, making sure that your appliances seemed reliable.

It didn’t matter if your product was Coke and had a lot more to do with cavities than with world peace, suddenly in these genius’s hands, buying a coke was magically made to relate to creating “perfect harmony” worldwide.

With such marketing genius at your disposal, and a purchasing public that still believed that there was truth behind these kinds of mass marketing messages (“if it wasn’t true, they wouldn’t let them say that, right?”) your product would sell.  Your work would be done. Your business would be on its road to success.

Over time, the business landscape became more challenging. It came up against consumer cynicism, and it came up against enhanced word of mouth made possible through cheaper and faster communication methods (including such now-forgotten factors as the reduced cost of air travel and even the move from expensive to essentially-free long distance calls).

And, of course, the biggest chinks in the armor of marketing-driven products and services have come via the Internet, especially the websites and social media outlets powered by user-generated commentary.

Businesses are agitated about this changed landscape, and rightly so. This new, transparent marketplace is a scary place in which to do business. But it’s where all of us have to do business today. The balance of power has changed, with that power now weighted toward the customer in a big way.

Don Draper’s obsolete world of the “4-P’s” (product, place, price and promotion) has now been replaced by the dominance of human interactions, customer-on-customer and employee-on-customer, the “big H” as I call it, for human beings.  Today, all customers care about is how their fellow humans, online and off, have been treated by the humans who work for your company. This is the reality of our new, customer-driven world.  

And we all need to adapt: When customers no longer care what some actor on TV–the Maytag repairman, for example–says about your product, because they can look to their Facebook friends to find out the truth, you’d better make sure those Facebook friends are, in fact, inspired to say something nice about you–about how you responded to their service inquiries and product concerns. Inspired, that is, by how you treat them as customers.

There’s no better way to grow your brand, customer by customer by customer, than by getting this right.


The customer is not an interruption of your work (so don’t make them feel that way)

12-3 Customers are not an interruption smallIs your business unintentionally giving customers the feeling that they’re an interruption of your work? Are there ways that you, your business or your employees may be making your customers feel ignored, feel unimportant, feel that their patronage doesn’t mean that much to you?

The question essentially comes down not to whether customers are entirely ignored by employees, but whether they’re served with speed and enthusiasm.  In many business situations, of course the customer will, ultimately, be served; there’s no way to definitively ignore them.  If a customer’s standing at a counter awaiting service, they’re not going to be flat-out turned down. But will they get served after the nearest employee puts down her cell phone with a tiny accompanying grimace? After she finishes the note she is writing? After she finishes the sentence or paragraph she is sharing with her co-worker? Or right away, and with a smile?

The difference here is a matter of seconds, or even just milliseconds. But that brief time span, and the attitude it evokes, makes all the difference in how the customer feels about your company.

Here are a couple pointers that apply to most customer-facing situation. I’m sure after you examine your daily routines looking for “feel-like-an-interruption-points,” you can find some more:  

• Never talk with your co-workers—never—without situating yourself in a way that allows you to use your direct or peripheral senses to allow you to stop when a customer approaches, before the customer is made to feel that they’re taking you away from how you’d rather be spending your time.   (To put this bluntly: Your customer probably won't appreciate coming in contact with your backside before your face, and to have to get your attention in order to get you to turn around.)

• If you do talk with co-workers, never—even for a minute–make a customer or potential customer wait for you to finish your conversation, even if your conversation is work-related. Drop that conversation mid-sentence, assist the customer, and then come back to it after.

• If you work in a situation (such as a restaurant) where you are likely to intersect moving customers, remember to yield at any potential collision point. In fact, not only should you be yielding if a collision is otherwise imminent, you should be using your senses to allow you to yield before the guest even realizes that there is a potential collision point.

• When you pick up the phone, be ready to talk, and ready to listen.  Don’t be finishing up some previous work—they’ll be able to hear this in your voice even if they can’t hear the rustling of papers or the clicks on the keyboard.


Great Customer Service Reps are Born, not Made

11-25 Hiring Employees smallAll new hires need some formal or informal training to learn the ins and outs of their jobs, including customer service reps, who need to master basic company policies and procedures connected with customer interactions. While most employees who master training become great workers, perfect policy and procedure proficiency does not automatically make customer-facing employees good at their jobs.

Great customer service requires a special breed of people. Whether they sell to customers, help them navigate the aisles or resolve their issues on the phone, they display a genuine caring and helpful spirit, while being authentic. You can't teach that spirit, so your job is to seek it out from the time you write the want ad and throughout the interview process.

Advertise and Assess for Character Traits Before Technical Skills

Exceptional technical skills are meaningless in a customer service rep who doesn't deal well with people, so ask for people skills in the heading of your employment ad. A heading like, "Customer Service Rep with Computer Experience" attracts people who can log calls. A heading like, "Do People Come to You for Help?" draws in people who really like to help others. By all means, list minimum qualifications within the ad, but focus on attitude and people skills.

Of course, the interview requires the same type of focus. Be prepared to pose customer-related scenarios to find out how the applicant will handle them. And, even if some applicants fall slightly short of the skills requirements, listen for signs of trainability. Friendly, helpful people with basic computer skills can learn how to log calls, even if they have never before worked in a customer service environment.

Identify the Right Character Traits

You probably have no training in psychology, but that doesn't mean you have no capacity to recognize applicants who have a natural affinity for customer service. Here are some of the character traits to look for — and how to identify them:

  • Strong communication skills: Face it; angry or frustrated customers often do not communicate clearly. The reps you hire must be able to listen and understand long before they deliver a clear, unambiguous message. During the interview, applicants with the knack for two-way communication rise to the surface when you ask unclear questions. If they tactfully ask for clarification, they are better communicators than applicants who answer the wrong question.
  • Patience and compassion: Customers seldom seek out support when they are happy. In the worst cases, they are so livid that no solution seems to satisfy them. Your reps need a thick skin to avoid striking back at unearned verbal attacks. Then, they need the stamina to find resolutions that meet the customer's needs, while displaying a genuine degree of compassion for the customer's circumstances (no pity, please). A good way to test for these traits is to present an unsolvable issue and monitor the applicant's patience levels every time that you reject another solution.
  • Proactive problem-solving: Your company may have a rule book for resolving typical complaints. But even when reps memorize every rule, undocumented issues frequently arise. If you empower your employees to make decisions on the fly, raise some hypothetical situations to make sure that applicants have enough common sense to respond appropriately — and when they recognize the need to seek management intervention.

Mirror the Work Environment During the Interview

Traditionally, short phone interviews are a first step before bringing applicants in for one or more face-to-face meetings. But, does this really tell the whole story for a phone support applicant? Sure, these people may need to interact with other employees, so meeting in person makes sense. Still, the phone interview may be the best way to assess what their on-the-job performance will really be like.

If the position involves phone support, maybe the phone interview is most important because it lets you listen for a smile and get an idea of how well applicants read emotions over the phone without of the benefit of facial queues. Similarly, consider meeting in a coffee shop or restaurant to see how traveling sales reps handle business conversations in noisy environments — and to check their table manners.

Put Yourself in the Customer's Shoes During Each Interview:

You may be interviewing as the boss, but you need to listen to each answer as if you were the customer. Customers quickly recognize the difference between genuine support and scripted problem-solving. You can certainly teach new reps about the support process. You can even teach them to avoid certain stock phrases — like responding to a thank you with "no problem."

But helpfulness and winning personalities come from the heart. Bruce Nordstrom, of the third generation of customer service-oriented Nordstrom management, said it best: "We can hire nice people and teach them to sell, but we can't hire salespeople and teach them to be nice."


Five “New Normals” That Your Customer Experience Needs To Keep Up With


A neon sign with the words "Open 24 Hours" against a brick wall. 3D render with HDRI lighting and raytraced textures.Here are five places where your customer experience may have fallen out of sync with what today's customers are looking for. Check the list and see where you stand.  It can make a real bottom-line difference today, and a sustainability difference over at least the next several years.

1. Good self-service options are a must: No matter how good your human-delivered customer service, customers expect self-service options as well. Self-service includes everything from web-based e-commerce to IVR (interactive voice response telephone systems) to concierge-like self-help touch-screen menus in public spaces to passengers printing their own boarding passes at home before traveling. This is a powerful trend in customer service, and companies that ignore it, pursue it reluctantly, or violate the basic laws of its implementation will be left in the dust.

There are various factors driving the self-service trend: customers' round-the-clock lifestyle, a buying populace that is increasingly tech savvy, and even in some cases the higher comfort level of socially anxious customers when doing business with machines rather than face to face or even on the phone.

2. Extended hours are the new 9-5 Customers expect extended hours: hours that you’re open, hours that you provide support.  This may mean 24/7 or as close as you can get. For example: For its advertising clients, Google now not only offers support in 42 languages, it does so nearly around the clock, and offers English language support 24/5. That’s pretty good, considering we’re talking about B2B, non mission-critical support.

Customers also expect more flexibility and options during traditionally “off” hours. For example, if you’re in foodservice, consider letting customers order from either the dinner or lunch menu in the mid-afternoon, and consider offering a cold sandwich menu available late in the evening after the kitchen has closed but your bar is still open.

3. Faster, faster, faster Do you still have internal company documents with obsolete standards like “We strive to respond to Internet inquiries within 48 hours”?  Maybe such a time frame made sense a few years ago (I actually doubt it, but maybe), but today, such a response time is he equivalent of 36 years in Internet time.  Your customer support standard needs to be response within just a few hours; after that, your customer is going to assume that you’re never going to get back to them. An intensified expectation of timeliness also applies to product and services delivery, an area where amazon.com is obviously one of the leaders. Amazon’s example, and the twitchiness that apps and the Internet itself invoke, means that your company’s traditional definition of “fast enough” probably isn’t, anymore.

4. Customers are looking for fun even in what used to be dull: On the one hand, there's a new expectation that fun, adventure, even ‘danger’ can be incorporated in potentially mundane interactions. Business travel is a great example of this: More and more travelers try to integrate some adventure and some local exploration into what are ostensibly business trips. Conversely, airlines whose long-haul flights offer a “quick dine” option so the tray isn’t in the way when passengers are trying to work have their heads screwed on right.

5. "If I don't have a picture of it on my phone, it didn't happen": Social consumption is now the norm. Lisa Holladay, branding and marketing guru at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, tells me she's heard this sentiment lately from young customers.  This means that if business isn't building opportunities for social sharing into the customer experience, you're missing out on a chance to delight–rather than drive away–your customers. 


Never Stop Believing in the Importance of Every Single Customer

11-13 importance of every customer smallSad but true: The level of focus and attentiveness that’s common when your business has only a few customers tends to slide when your five customers become 50, or 500, or a thousand. The commitment that you had in the early days to keeping close to your customers, with the high level of care and knowledge of the customers that requires tends to fall by the wayside as you grow.

You stop signing your notes by hand. You stop writing “thank you” on the invoices. You get rid of Jackie and Joanne, your quirkily charismatic receptionists, and switch to an auto-attendant to answer incoming calls.

This loss of focus doesn’t happen on its own, or overnight. At every step of this downward journey, there are defining moments, the moments when you answer, one way or the other, questions like: Do we really want to stop including a postpaid return envelope with our invoices? Should we just let it slide when a new employee is sneaking texts in on the job, in sight of customers, where in the past we would have been sure to gently and quickly correct such behavior?

These moments represent your chance to prevent, or slow, the blurring of your initial customer focus, but only if, in every single case, you answer the relaxing of standards with the following retort: “If we would do it for our first customer, we’ll do it for our 10,000th.

The secret, in other words, is to never stop believing in the importance of every single customer.  Never start believing – as cell phone providers and so many companies in so many other industries have – that there is an infinite cohort of customers out there for the taking, if only our marketing and sales get the promotions and discounts out there far and wide.

Tell yourselves instead that there's just one customer, the one you're facing. The one you need to follow up with, to make sure her problem was successfully resolved.

There's only customer Jim. One Margo. One Alecia. Which means that even after you have thousands of customers, you need to do everything you can to maintain the mindset that every one of them is a core customer—and to treat the loss of a single customer as a tragedy.

Here's why: Because every single customer is irreplaceable.

Regardless of the size of your market segment, once you start writing off customers, I can predict the day in the future (and it's probably not far into the future) when you’ll be out of business.  


And this is a calamity to be avoided.

Let your competitors keep thinking of customers as an abstraction, as an infinite plurality. You need to think of them, and serve them, in the specificity of their individuality, their Jim-ishness, Margo-ishness, and Alecia-ishness.

Jim, who likes his service languid with plenty of time to consider his options. Margo who is always in a hurry, and doesn't care how your day was. And poor Alecia, whose cat is at the vet, and isn't in the mood for your Pollyanna ponderings.

Now, every customer's different from the next one — Jim from Margo, Margo from Alecia, and Alecia from Jim. Some will be easier to serve, and some harder.  And some are easier to serve sometimes and less so at others.  But each of them is precious.

Recapture this attitude. Stop thinking "good enough" is o.k. Stop thinking your early reputation (built on those moments when you were treating every customer as precious) can pull you through your current slackness. It won't. Only your redoubled attention to superior service can do that. 


5 Keys to Understanding Millennial Customer Values

10-26 millenial values smallMillennials, the group of young people born 1980ish to 2000ish, are the largest generation in U.S. and world history. And they’re right on the cusp of having the largest spending power in the U.S., and in many other countries as well.  And the values that drive this important generation of customers are different in significant ways from preceding generations. 

Since millennials, more than previous generations at the same age, strive to buy where their values lie–whenever they can afford to– a business that wants to win the hearts of these consumers will benefit from knowing what their values entail. (Think this stuff doesn't matter, or that it can be faked? Think again: One millennial I interviewed told me, “People my age are especially attuned to and adept at figuring out if a company is being pro-people or pro-environment in its marketing, and anti-people or anti-environment in its actions.” I believe her–and so should you, if you want the soon to be all-powerful millennial generation as customers, loyalists, and ambassadors for your company.)

Before I go any further, I want to add a caveat: Millennials, like any other cohort, are very, very diverse. So any generalization like this list that follows can only be that: a generalization.  So take this rundown with at least a grain of salt. 

  1. Millennials want to protect the environment. Millennials harbor a deep-seated support for environmentally friendly action. This is something the millennial generation has believed in since childhood and that shows no sign of slowing down, perhaps in part because this is the first generation to grow up with an overwhelming scientific consensus pointing to manmade climate change.
  2. Millennials support workers’ rights. According to Pew, 78% of millennials agree with the statement, “Labor unions are needed to protect the rights and economic well-being of workers.” Unions or not, they strongly support the idea that companies should treat employees well and pay them fairly.
  3. Millennials are tolerant. Pew surveys consistently demonstrate that this generation is more supportive of minorities on issues of race, more tolerant of interracial dating, more supportive of gay marriage, more in favor of unmarried adults cohabitating, more approving of mothers working who have young children, and more likely by far to have a close gay friend than do members of older generations.
  4. Millennials support diversity. From Pew again: Almost twice the percentage of millennials agree with the statement that “we should make every possible effort to improve the position of blacks and other minorities, even if it means giving them preferential treatment” than do members of previous generations. On the issue of immigration, only one-third of millennials agree with the statement that “immigrants threaten American values and customs.”

Note: Millennials’ support for diversity is no doubt affected by how diverse this generation is itself. Millennials are by far the most varied cohort in U.S. generational history.  If you were looking to generalize Boomers or the Silent Generation in the U.S., a good guess would be “they’re all white.” You’d be wrong, but not by all that much. Ninety percent of the Silent Generation is white (80% are non-Hispanic white), and even among Boomers, 73% are non-Hispanic white. The makeup of the millennial generation is far different. Only 61% of millennials are non-Hispanic whites (this percentage is similar to that in the smaller Gen X), and millennials are more likely than any generation since the Silent Generation to be the children of immigrants. (All figures here are from Pew research.) Even these numbers don’t fully demonstrate the impact of this diversity. Take note that these “minorities” (hardly the right term) are far from evenly dispersed across the country, and are disproportionately represented in cities. In metropolises of significant size around the country, “minority” (Hispanic, Asian-American and African American) groups together make up the majority. This diversity is well represented in purchasing decisions. Among the all-important business traveler segment, there are 60% more Hispanics, double the number of Asian-Americans, and 40% more women in the millennial generation traveling for business by plane than there are among nonmillennial business fliers, according to Boston Consulting Group.

  1. Millennials believe company values should go beyond corporate self-interest. In general, millennials disagree with the notion that a business’s only responsibilities are to its shareholders and to watching the bottom line, according to studies cited by Van den Bergh and Behrer. Millennials’ faith in the free market sank in 2008 with the stock market, housing prices, their parents’ retirement funds and their own employment prospects. Far from supporting an “it’s all about the bottom line” philosophy of business, their ethos is closer to something like the “triple bottom-line” equation that Southwest Airlines strives to follow: Our Performance, Our People and Our Planet.



 
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