Browsing Date

March 2014

How to Get In Bed with Your Banker

By March 20, 2014 No Comments

Stocksy_txpf799c772Ea3000_Small_104560Most small businesses still need banks. They provide valuable financial services daily for companies. Banks can still be a major source of capital for the promising business. How do you make sure that they are there when you need them? Get your business in bed with your banker! While this many not conjure up a pleasant image, it must be part of the strategy. Getting the banker to know your company’s capital requirements must be established far in advance of when you may need them. Here is what to do and why it works:

Establish yourself as a customer. Open checking and money market accounts at the bank. Use their merchant, ACH and wire services. Pay fees to use their services. Why it works: Bank employees are trained to help customers and you want to part of that group as soon as possible.

Go into the bank weekly. Be seen at the bank and get to know the branch manager and key staff. Visit at least a few times a month. Talk to them about the bank, their family and your business. Why it works: People do business with other people they know, like, and trust.

Participate in common community events. Go to the events that the banks sponsors locally. Show support for their causes. Get on joint committees. Why it works: You can demonstrate what it is like to work with you and share a common goal.

Share the progress of your company. Sit down with loan officers before capital is needed. Show them your sales and profit projections. Impress them with your knowledge of the financial statements. Revisit them when you make progress toward your goals. Why it works: Numbers are power. They are easy to take to a loan committee. Bankers trust business people that understand them.

Get a small loan. This may be a home equity loan (or similar secured asset) to be used by your company. Pay the loan back on time and then try to increase it. Why it works: This builds a reputable track record the bank can reference.

Keep your personal credit score high (as well and Dunn and Bradstreet number). Bankers like numbers that increase. Why it works: A high credit score will show that you can be trusted to borrow money. They believe that past performance predicts the future.

Bring more customers to the bank. Everyone loves referrals. Be responsible in helping the bank grow their business. Why it works: If you help them, they are more likely to help you.

Go for the big ask: It’s time to apply for the bigger loan for your company. This can be a term note or line of credit. Why it works: Because the bank now trusts you and your company.

How have you got a banker in bed with you to get a loan?


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Should You Hire Your Spouse to Work in Your Business?

By March 18, 2014 No Comments

Stocksy_txpb6090cd68s3000_Small_17056If you have trouble finding workers with the dedication and loyalty you need, there’s a solution that can offer the best of both worlds: hiring your spouse. You get an employee who you know truly cares about your business, and the money you pay your spouse stays “all in the family.”

But before you broach the idea to your spouse, there are some important factors to consider.

How will working together affect your relationship? Some spouses can work together all day long and enjoy a happy marriage after hours, while others find business stresses spilling over into their personal lives. Clearly define roles within the business so each of you knows what he or she is responsible for. Also set boundaries outside the business, such as not discussing business over dinner or taking regular weekends off.

What does your spouse expect from the job? Perhaps your spouse expects to work closely together and spend lots of time with you, while you expect to scarcely see each other because you’ll both be so busy handling your separate duties. Clarify your expectations from the beginning and make sure you are both on the same page. Is this a short-term arrangement or a permanent move? Will your spouse need to work for free if money is tight?

How will a spouse working in the business affect your company’s dynamic? When you bring a family member into the business, nonfamily employees may assume your spouse will get favored treatment, that they will be passed over for promotions or that they can’t be honest with you about problems with your spouse. Discuss these issues openly to ease their worries.

What are the legal and tax implications? The way that you report and pay taxes for a spouse in the business will vary depending on whether your spouse is considered an employee or partner/co-owner. If the spouse is an employee, you need to withhold appropriate taxes from his or her pay just as with any employee. If your spouse has an equal say in the business and/or contributes capital, he or she is considered a partner, which affects your business’s tax reporting and payments. (See this IRS article for more information.) To avoid unpleasant surprises, consult your attorney and accountant regarding the tax and legal implications of bringing a spouse on board. 


Mondays with Mike: The Quick Qualifier – The Secret To Better, Faster Hiring

By March 17, 2014 No Comments

For entrepreneurs with a sizeable staff, payroll can be one of the biggest expenses.  That expense can multiply quickly if we don’t hire the right people, so any techniques we can find to improve our hiring outcomes can make a huge difference in our bottom lines.  The fact is that there aren’t a whole lot of shortcuts when it comes to running your business better, but I’m going to share one that can help you simultaneously speed up your hiring process while sifting out your best choices – automatically.

????????????????????????????????Conventional wisdom may tell you that casting as wide a net as possible in your hiring search will yield the highest quality result, but given today’s job market, your problem is unlikely to be a shortage of applications.  Rather, you’re likely to be buried under a sea of resumes, and your greatest challenge will be separating the wheat from the chaff – reducing the flood to a manageable stack of resumes from qualified, competent folks.  That’s where my technique comes into play.

When I post an ad for a job, about 75% of the way through the ad, I insert the following:  “To prove that you’re a meticulous reader, you have to include the following sentence when you send your resume: ‘It is with my utmost respect that I hereto surrender my curriculum vitae for your consideration.’”

Now here’s where the automation comes in.  You create an email filter that searches for the specified sentence, and sorts all of the qualifying resumes into a folder for you to review.  Think it won’t make a big difference?  Think again!  I’ve had as many as 80% of the resumes for a specific position eliminated by this filtering tactic.  Now you may be worried that you might discard a great resume, but let me tell you why this technique works:

  1. The unemployment rate is still so high that folks are desperate, sending off resumes to any ad they read, regardless of whether or not they’re qualified.  In fact, the applicants who don’t include the sentence may not have even read the application, and might have zero relevant experience.  They’re not the employees you’re looking for.
  2. Regardless of the field, attention to detail is crucial, and including the sentence demonstrates that an applicant cares enough to get it right.
  3. You’re looking for candidates who can follow instructions, and applicants who comply with your directions demonstrate a willingness to do what you expect them to.  They’re eager to please, and that’s important for nearly every position in a business.

I’ve used this technique repeatedly, and it’s proven to help select the very best candidates for my careful consideration.  In fact, one of the best employees I’ve ever hired responded by writing: “Yes, I’m so detail-oriented I am including the sentence you requested. However, I also noticed you spelled the word ‘meticulous’ incorrectly, and here’s the correct way to spell it.”  She ended up being a partner in one of my companies.


How to Launch a Philanthropic Program Within Your Company

By March 14, 2014 No Comments

The concept of corporate social responsibility, or CSR, is incredibly popular in large companies where deep budgets allow employees time off to participate in community-oriented projects. But what about small businesses? Without big budgets, is it possible for the little guys to make an impact?

“Absolutely, yes,” says Lauri Flaquer, small business expert and owner of Saltar Solutions, a business consultancy in St. Paul, Minnesota. “In fact, I’ve been seeing a ton of small businesses develop their own philanthropic programs as of late.”

Interested in getting involved in your community? If so, here are some helpful steps to get you started.

Poll your employees

You want your company to get involved, but you aren’t sure where to allocate your resources. Chances are good that some of your employees may already volunteer or give to specific charities in their off time, so start by involving them in the development of your CSR program.

“Ask your employees what organizations they think the company should give to or volunteer with. Then, task those who are passionate with giving a presentation on their pet causes and ask the group to vote,” recommends Flaquer.

Be choosy

Don’t have any takers for a charity presentation? Find your own non-profit to support. Flaquer recommends looking at organizations that are somehow connected the mission of your company.  “If you own a water filtration business, for example, try supporting a charity that promotes clean water,” she says. “Or if you are in the publishing industry, maybe join a non-profit that prevents the destruction of the Amazon rainforest.”

Do your homework. Flaquer recommends checking with the IRS to make sure the organization is a 501c3 (tax code for non-profit) and with the Better Business Bureau to research on its reputation in the community.

????????????????????????????????????????????????????Schedule volunteer time strategically

Too busy to volunteer? Flaquer recommends scheduling volunteer days (or hours) when your business is in a lull. “If your organization is cyclical, choose a time when it isn’t all that busy,” she suggests.

Transform a volunteering activity into a team building activity. Instead of renting an expensive hall and calling a catering company, opt to spend a day out of the office, cleaning a local park. Then spring for some pizza at nearby picnic tables. The event will end up costing you less and your employees will probably enjoy it more, too.

Set boundaries early

“When you are volunteering your time, it is easy for that time to take over your full-time job because you feel so good about helping others,” Flaquer says. “I recommend that before you start your program, set out exactly how much time you and your company will spend giving back, how much money you will spend and how many resources you will.

“Those guidelines will help you feel good about the impact you are making, but also help you keep an eye on your core business.” 


3 Ways to Sink the Sale of Your Company

By March 13, 2014 No Comments

??????????????????????????????????????Many small business owners dream of selling their company for a huge profit. After many years of hard work, they finally found the right buyer to acquire their company. After negotiating business terms, they signed the letter of intent (LOI). Now comes the tough part: collecting all the due diligence information and having the lawyers on both sides negotiate a final purchase agreement.

Here are the three ways that sink the sale of any company:

1. Pressure from external parties. This can be from overly aggressive lawyers arguing over largely irrelevant legal terms on the purchase agreement. One lawyer in a deal I was involved wanted to know what the seller’s responsibility would be if “the sun exploded”. Remember, in the sale of most small businesses, the only terms that really matter are the upfront sale price, sale payment schedule, representations and warranties. Many times, the seller’s accountant insists on charging added fees to give financial statements to the perspective buyer. One accountant even wanted a lump sum “research fee” for the client to collect all their historical records. It is common for the landlord to approve the transfer of any leases. They sometimes charge a steep “transfer fee” for their approval. Regulatory agencies with licensing requirements can also mean a delay of months. The remedy: Make sure that to have a lawyer that is familiar with small sale transactions. Collect all the information from the accountant up front for due diligence. Seek outside regulatory agency approval far in advance of the completion of any transaction.

2. Inconsistent financial numbers or other changing “facts”. All financial statements tell the company’s story. If during due diligence, this story changes, and then it will raise questions from the buyer.  Weaker numbers (specifically profitability) that differ from those provided in the LOI will always result in a price reduction. Additionally, changing “facts” may get the buyer nervous. This can be in the form of profiles of customer concentrations, revenue trends or employee status. The remedy: The small business owner always needs to know what story they are telling with every fact disclosed and explain any difference in the narrative.

3. Sellers or Buyers changing their mind. This happens very often. The seller decides that they don’t want to sell their company. The reason they give now is the sale is not enough money. More than likely, they are afraid what they will do with their time a day after the sale. The buyer sometimes has a change of heart on how the new business will fit into their company or “what they thought was true now isn’t”. The remedy: As a seller, the small business owner must determine what they will do the day after the sale of the company before they decide to sell it.

Barry Moltz helps small businesses get unstuck. His new book, “How to Get Unstuck: 25 Ways to Get Your Business Growing Again” is available in March. Barry can be found at


Work Your Biz Wednesday: 5 Things I’ve Learned

By March 12, 2014 No Comments

Happy 15th Anniversary to the Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson! Check out her list of the top 5 things she has learned over the years, and follow her on Twitter at @SmallBizLady.

From March 5-25, Melinda is giving away a prize every business day to help support your small business venture! Apply to the "15 Days of Giveaways" contest today at!