Posts Tagged ‘Social Media’


How to Guarantee More Engagement for Your Blog

11-6 Blogging for business - small“If you build it, they will come”- from the movie, “Field of Dreams”

You just finished writing an insightful piece for your company’s blog that may change the industry. Now, all that has to be done is post it and people will write hundreds of reactions, right? No, this is wrong. The “just because you build it” strategy, doesn’t mean users will find the website and react to it.

Instead, here are seven surefire techniques to get more engagement for your posts:

  1. Be relevant, controversial or entertaining. Don’t be like your competitors. Post content that people want to read that can’t be found other places on the web. Have a point of view that will challenge readers and push them to respond. This is one place where a “me too” strategy does not work.
  2. Be regular. Post at least weekly. The more that users know there will be new content on a web site, the more likely they are to read it on a regular basis. This is the only way to build a sustained following that will make users comfortable enough for commenting on the blog posts.
  3. Be visual. People would much rather see a picture or watch a two minute video than read a long detailed article. Use numbers in titles and throughout the articles to attract users looking for simple solutions. The numbers 5 and 7 are most popular with readers.
  4. Be an easy read. Don’t construct posts that are dense with text. Make it simple to pick out the relevant points so a user can respond even if they did not read the entire post in detail. Use subheads, numbers and bolding to hook the reader.
  5. Add links. Don’t let users leave the company blog by clicking through on links. Ensure that all outside links open in a separate browser window so users can easily come back to your page. Also, include internal web links that will refer to other content on your blog to generate additional traffic for older posts.
  6. Share. Utilize share buttons for Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Google Plus on the company blog page. Test that the actual “share” includes a short description and relevant picture. Post notifications from your business handle about the content. This needs to be posted more than one time, but without repeating the same title. Take different angles of the article to use as headlines when posting again on various social media platforms.
  7. Watch style and grammar. No one wants to read a post that has spelling errors or language syntax problems. It also reflects very badly on the brand. The reader will ask themselves: If they can’t spell correctly, can I trust them to solve my problem? Broken links will also frustrate the user. If you can’t get an additional person to review the post then read it aloud and click through on all links to find any errors. Tools can be used to periodically find broken links on the company web site. http://www.wpuniversity.com/blog/5-tools-find-broken-links

How do you get users to interact with your blog content?


Mondays with Mike: What The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Can Teach You About Marketing

Your mother, your brother, your best friend, and a loooong list of celebrities, and me too: everyone jumped on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, posting videos of themselves, donating money, and challenging their friends and family to do the same.  Those who participated got their fifteen minutes of fame, and those who wimped out were ridiculed as being no fun.

Aside from the fact that the Challenge raised millions of dollars and promoted awareness about ALS, a terrible, degenerative disease, the Ice Bucket Challenge is a remarkable example of the tremendous power of social media, and it illustrates what can happen when you invite your customers to share pics, videos, and messages that promote your brand.  There are several important principles that the Ice Bucket Challenge teaches us about developing a winning social media marketing strategy. 

  1. Be the EST.  While Challenge videos that simply featured calls out to a couple of friends followed by a typical soaking didn’t circulate terribly far, videos of particularly creative approaches were shared thousands and thousands of times.  FunniEST, coldEST, wettEST … extreme examples got the most views.  Whether it was Ben Affleck calling out his celebrity pals and then pushing his wife into their swimming pool, or whether it was a group of middle aged moms rapping their challenge, standing out from the crowd is what gets the most mileage.  Invite the participants in your social media campaign to interact in creative ways.  Ask them to give you their EST.
  2. Find something ubiquitous.  Everyone could participate in the Ice Bucket Challenge, because all that’s required is water, ice, and some sort of container.  If the components had been caviar, platinum, and moon rocks, then that would have left most of us out.  Invite your fans to tweet, photograph, and share pics of themselves in your place of business, or wearing your logo.  Make it simple, repeatable, and leave room for creativity.
  3. Recognize the emotional power of social media.  There was some criticism of the Ice Bucket Challenge from folks who thought it trivialized the disease.  Some of the most powerful videos posted and shared were those made by people who suffer from ALS and from their friends and families.  Authenticity shines through in a video, and creating a powerful emotional connection with your brand through your customers’ true stories promotes your brand in a positive way.
  4. Be pictorial or easy to replicate.  Maybe you invite your fans to take your logo on vacation with them and share pics of your logo in exotic places.  Or perhaps you give away bumper stickers and ask customers to take pics of their cars in unusual spots.  The key is to make it easy to incorporate your logo into a photo that can be shared and reshared until the image covers the globe. 

Creative images make millions of impressions via social media.  You invite the participation of your customers, and while you will need to monitor and perhaps to edit content to ensure that it’s appropriate, the beauty of a social media campaign is that you can sit back and let your fans do your marketing for you. 

453341376-1024x623


Mondays with Mike: The 4 Crazy Ways To Advertise With Mobile Technology

Consumers are absolutely besieged by images, messages, and impressions.  Every time we turn on our phones, computers, televisions, e-readers, or radios, we’re inundated by advertising and information.  Given the overload that we experience, it’s often the most outrageous messages that hit their mark. 

If you’re looking to boost the number of impressions you make, one of the very best ways to do it is via social media. Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and Instagram touch more users more times per day than we can really wrap our heads around.  That’s a lot of potential impressions, but you have to do something novel to really capture the attention of potential customers.  If you’re determined to make a splash, here are some ideas to get your started. 

  1. Invite users to submit videos or pics with your product or logo.  Think people won’t take the time to make and upload a video?  Think again!  Look at the thousands and thousands of ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos filling up your newsfeed on Facebook.  The videos of folks dumping ice water over their heads – sometimes in very creative ways – demonstrate the power of the novelty video.  Someone makes a video, shares it, and it spreads, increasing exponentially to reach more users every day.  The best way to adapt this photo/video idea for business is to run a contest:  Invite customers to post pics of themselves wearing a hat or t-shirt with your logo while they’re on vacation or in an unusual spot.  The photo that gets the most likes or shares wins a prize.  Think about the potential here – you’re going to be making thousands of impressions and building fans for life.  Powerful stuff.
  2. Pop-up advertising.  We become completely immune to things we see or hear day after day.  When the same old ad comes on my Pandora radio, I completely tune it out.  It’s like I don’t even hear it.  Novelty is king, and that’s why pop-up advertising is so effective.  Whether you turn your pizza shop delivery vehicle into a giant slice of pizza or whether you hire a clown who walks on five foot tall stilts to entertain folks in the parking lot on a busy Saturday, the real secret to pop-up advertising is that random people will take pics and share them with their friends.  Your little attention-getting stunt will continue to make its way around social media long after your part is finished.
  3. 2014-08-25_1635Flash mobs.  More labor intensive than some other techniques, the surprise and wonder factor here is huge.  You coordinate a number of people to perform in public, making sure you get good quality video of the event, and you post the video online.  Again, like the other social media techniques, the power isn’t in the initial views.  While the folks who happen to be on the street or mall when you perform will certainly be surprised and enjoy the event, the real numbers come when the video is shared over and over, resulting in tens, or even hundreds of thousands of impressions.
  4. Work lightning fast.  Twitter is particularly useful for brief messages that are timely and relevant to rapidly developing current events.  One of my favorite examples was the Oreo hashtag during the Superbowl when the lights in the stadium abruptly went out.  “You can still dunk in the dark” was the tagline of the ad that appeared on Twitter just seconds into the blackout.  The ad was retweeted countless times, and Oreo was declared the winner of the Marketing Superbowl.  You need a smart, witty social media guru on your payroll in order to take advantage of current events opportunities, but it can be worth every penny you pay.  Seize the moment!

Key to all of these social media strategies is the fact that by getting consumers involved with spreading the word about your brand, you’re transforming them into your biggest fans.  Social media works because everyone wants their fifteen minutes of fame, and there’s no reason while they can’t have that fifteen minutes while wearing your logo and creating millions of brand impressions. 


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Who Are the Online Influencers, and How Can You Reach Them?

Stocksy_txp89ac3847maA000_Small_295975Is your business taking advantage of online influencers to build your reputation, build relationships and make sales? Online influencers—or people whose opinions are shared online and disproportionately influence others—come in several varieties, including:

  • Bloggers with lots of followers among your target market (check out Klout or Alltop to help you identify these),
  • Journalists who report about your industry (you’ll know these by reading industry publications, major newspapers and business publications), and
  • Decision-makers (and those connected with them) at companies you want to sell to (LinkedIn is a useful tool for identifying these).

To successfully reach and influence online influencers, follow these steps:

  • Know what your goals are. Do you want a key influencer to write about your company in a newspaper, review your product on her blog, or introduce you to someone who can help your business grow? By determining specific goals, you’ll be better able to identify which influencers will be most useful in achieving them.
  • Be active on the social channels your influencers frequent. That includes social media as well as the influencers’ own blog and/or website. Spend some time “lurking” to get a sense of what the person cares about and thinks before you reach out to him or her.
  • Start small. Retweeting or sharing an influencer’s post is a good start to getting yourself on their radar. Then move on to commenting on posts. Don’t just say “Great post!” but offer a brief, thoughtful insight—ideally, you want to engage the person in an online conversation or get a conversation going among other followers.
  • Acknowledge any interaction. If an online influencer responds to your comment, retweets something you tweeted or even just thanks you for a comment, be sure to respond!
  • Move it on up. Once you feel that the influencer is aware of you as an individual and you’ve built up some goodwill on social media, you can reach out via email. To avoid being perceived as spam or a “cold call,” refer to your social media relationship and any mutual connections you may have. You don’t want to seem like a stalker or salesperson, so if email doesn’t get a response after two or three tries, go back to social media.
  • Once you’ve made a connection, be straightforward. Politely ask for what you want from the person, be it an introduction, an article or a review: “I’d love it if you’d review our new product X. May I send you a sample?”
  • Maintain the relationship. Don’t go dark once you get what you want. Keep the relationship going by interacting with your influencer just as you would any friend or colleague. 

Mondays with Mike: 5 Tips For Finding Prospects On Twitter

Twitter

I’ll admit it.  I thought Twitter was a silly little fad when I first learned about it.  Seriously – how much effect can 140 characters have?  It turns out that it’s a massively powerful medium, and I wish I’d started using it earlier.  It can be a goldmine in terms of establishing relationships with existing and prospective customers.  Here’s how you do it:

  1. Search for your company name.  This sounds like a no-brainer, but it’s so essential!  This first key step lets you know who’s talking about you … and what they’re saying.  You’ll know right away if there’s a problem you hadn’t heard about, and you’ll get a read on the public’s impression of your company.  The folks who are already tweeting about you are the first ones you should make contact with.  In addition to alerting you to problems folks may be having, Twitter gives you a real-time means of responding to criticism in professional and productive ways, establishing your business as a stand-up organization that cares about its clients.
  2. Search for your competitors.  Not only is it just good business practice to know what the other guy is up to, but monitoring the chatter about your competition can also give you priceless inside information into problems or challenges your competitor is facing.  If you learn that customers are upset that the pizza shop down the road discontinued a particular entrée, you may want to advertise that you’re adding a new menu item (which, coincidentally, is what consumers are begging for!)  Unscripted, candid feedback on the other guy’s business may give you ideas about new products or tip you off about mistakes you should avoid making. 
  3. Search for relevant keywords.  Information is power, and knowing what terms people are using to search for services and products like yours is so important.  You can use the information to load your messages up with the right keywords, and you’ll discover links to articles and discussions in your industry that you might never have seen.  Everything you uncover can help you tweak your message and be more sure of reaching the right people.
  4. Use an autoresponder.  Twitter works because it’s instantaneously interactive, and if your Twitter followers don’t get that play from you, they’ll lose interest.  You should thank new followers (automatically,) and using an autoresponder even lets you create and send messages even if you’re taking the day off to go fishing with your kids. 
  5. Produce relevant content.  If your tweets are boring, repetitive, or irrelevant, then you’re going to lose followers as soon as you get them.  Armed with the competitor’s information and the relevant keywords, you’re prepped to start creating useful articles that your followers will actually read and use.  Even though each tweet has a maximum of 140 characters, you can send the link to your content.  Giving your customers useful tips and suggestions that relate to your industry can win you loyal customers for life.

Twitter is so much more than selfies.  It’s a more powerful medium than I ever though it could be, and harnessing that power gives you far-reaching access to millions of potential customers.    


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 5 Tips to Get a Grip on Social Media

As an avid user of social media for business, I know how crucial social media is to marketing for today’s small businesses. Unfortunately, I also know how much of a time-suck it can be. How do you strike the right balance between spending half your day on social media and abandoning it for days on end? Try these tips to get a grip:

  1. Find your focus. Your business doesn’t need to be on every single social media channel out there. The main criteria for choosing a social network should be, “Where are my customers spending their time?” This can vary depending on your audience and your industry. For instance, if you sell B2B services to corporations, you’ll likely find your customers on LinkedIn. If you run a clothing boutique for women, chances are Pinterest or Facebook is where your prospects hang out. One or two social networks can be plenty as long as they’re getting results.
  2. Set a schedule. The worst thing you can do on social media is “go dark” for weeks at a time. When I visit a company’s Facebook page and it hasn’t posted in a month, I start wondering if they’re out of business or how responsive they are to their customers. Set a schedule and stick to it. It’s better to post less often, but regularly, than to post sporadically.
  3. ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????A picture is worth 1,000 words. Images get more engagement than text-only posts on most social networks. Instead of struggling to craft the perfect words, save time by sharing product shots, behind-the-scenes photos or short video clips.
  4. Get someone else to do the work. Encouraging customers to share their own photos or videos, to comment on questions you post or to put suggestions on your social media accounts is a great way to generate more content without having to create it yourself. Sharing others’ content, such as links to interesting news, videos or statistics, also saves time and promotes your business as a source of information.
  5. Use time-saving tools. You don’t want to get too automated, but using social media management tools can save you steps without making your account feel mechanical. Hootsuite, Buffer and NutshellMail are a few popular options to try. 

Mondays with Mike: 7 Crazy Ideas To Turn Your Customers Into Raving Fans

The far reach of social media has fundamentally altered the way in which we interact with one another.  Things happen lightning fast, and it’s commonplace to get moment-to-moment updates on what your friends are doing.  While you may believe that it is – in fact – possible to OD on never-ending selfies, the prevalence of digital photos and tweets that reach millions of followers is a huge opportunity for savvy entrepreneurs who are able to enlist their customers in building their brands.  Here’s how to convert your customers to your biggest fans:

  1. Have your clients do some of the work.  If you can find a way to let customers make doing business with you a unique and personalized experience, they’re far more likely to tell their friends about you.  The best recent example of this principle are the number of business popping up that provide detailed art instruction for a group of people to gather at a bar or restaurant and paint their own picture.  You see Facebook posts of smiling faces and proud amateur artists.  They’re selling the experience to their friends.
  2. Play hard to get.  The American Express Black Card is the best example bar none.  It’s obscenely expensive, but people fall all over themselves, coveting an invitation to open one, and only a few customers ever receive that invitation.  Creating a sense of exclusivity makes your product that much more desirable.
  3. Deny your own existence.  One of the reasons there was so much buzz about the Amex Black Card when it was created was because Amex refused to confirm the card’s existence.  They relied on the excitement of gossip and speculation to generate interest.
  4. ????????????????Encourage tattoos.  I know this tactic may sound extreme, but when folks start permanently applying your logo to their bodies, you’ve officially arrived.  Associating your brand with a lifestyle and developing a great logo is a good start.  Think no one would ever ink a logo?  Look around you at the beer labels, band logos, and Harley Davidson tattoos that are out there.  It’s possible.
  5. Go underground.  Throw exclusive parties for your very best customers – parties that they must be invited to attend.  Offering special perks for invitation only rewards clubs makes customers crave that favored status.
  6. Put your customers through boot camp.  The idea here is to have a series of steps that customers have to go through in order to achieve a special status.  Give them special status and reward them with exclusive offers that are available only to the elite customers who’ve been dedicated enough to reach your upper echelon.  Give customers a shirt or a car magnet that boasts about their status, and you’re generating interest everywhere your customer goes. 
  7. Create an annual event.  Start a tradition that anchors your company as a valuable member of your community.  Whether you sponsor a fall festival or a public Easter Egg hunt, giving your community something to look forward to creates lasting, positive associations for your company.

So the real secret of all of these techniques is what happens afterwards.  By creating loyal, dedicated fans of your brand, you’re inevitably creating brand ambassadors who will Tweet, Instagram, and Facebook about your company, spreading the word with every like, share, or comment.  That’s why these raving fans are so valuable – they become your cheerleaders and enthusiastically help build your brand.  


Are Smart Phones Killing your Employees’ Soft Skills?

?????????????????????????????????????????If anyone tries to convince you that the abbreviated language known as “social media slang” is appropriate for business, DBTS (translated: don’t believe that stuff).  I’m not saying that it has no use — it might be helpful if used judiciously in a tweet from your company Twitter account or in a quick text message.  But anyone who represents your company needs the capacity to write correctly — and exercise a degree of courtesy and respect during face-to-face communication.  Unfortunately, smart phone mania may be robbing younger workers of these abilities, known as “soft skills.”

Of course, during a time when customers want everything right now, employees with 24/7 connection via smart phones can be major assets to your business. But just as you have to train them about the processes that they need to know to do their jobs, you may need to include a little education in soft skills as well.

Re-teach the Basic Writing Skills That They Have Forgotten from School

These days, no one expects electronic messages to be error-free.  In fact, now that many email messages are written on smart phones, many people put a tag at the end, warning, “Sent from my smart phone.  There will be typos.”  But when typos, misspellings or grammatical errors make it into formal business documents such as bids and proposals, your business can be significantly affected.  At the very least, unprofessional wording can alienate prospective customers.  Even worse, your business can take a major financial hit when an unclear sentence is misinterpreted to your company’s detriment.

Everyone in your company needs to adhere to basic writing standards.  They also need to understand that spell check is an absolute necessity, but proofreading is equally important (unless you have managed to remove every dirty term from the word processing dictionary).  For formatting and overall tone, you can provide them with samples of great documents or even a style guide for documents.  But until they have your complete confidence, have a designated person with strong writing skills review all documents and have the employees make corrections so that they can learn from their mistakes.

Texting Does Not Replace Face-to-Face Communication

The brevity of a 140-character tweet or a text message does not lend itself to highly courteous communication.  Tweets in particular are known for their often-snarky tone.  But when your employees interact with the public, you don’t want anyone to flash back to a certain soup seller from Seinfeld. Your employees may need a few verbal communication lessons in a safe environment before you release them to represent your company in the real world.

Role play sessions can be fun (or at least tolerable) and educational for employees.  Whether you set up activities in lunch sessions (you bring the pizza) or as part of company meetings, everyone can learn something new about interacting with others.  You can run the gamut of scenarios — from greeting customers at the door to cold-calling prospective customers.  Then, encourage group discussions to gain benefits from the viewpoints of a variety of people with their own personalities and sensitivities.

Everyone Benefits from Feedback

You have probably heard the old adage, “praise in public, criticize in private,” but well-placed public critiques can help improve the communication skills of your entire work force.  Unless every employee is a Miss Manners fan, there may be occasions when you receive a valid customer complaint.  Of course, you don’t want to gather the troops together to announce that Customer A complained because John said this or Mary did that.  But complaints can point out the need for more finesse in one area or another, and everyone can benefit from this type of feedback.  By all means, make it public.

Soft Skills Begin in the Workplace

Putting a group of employees in close quarters for 40 or more hours each week can add stress to the environment.  Unless you want your workplace atmosphere to resemble a dysfunctional family Thanksgiving dinner, everyone in your company will benefit by learning how to communicate effectively.  AAMOF (as a matter of fact), they may be 4ever gr8ful.


Does Business Etiquette Still Matter?

?????????????In recent years, business has become very casual. Gone are the work days of suits, stationary, big titles, corner offices, secretaries, and power lunches. Small business is now done through email, video chats, texting, meet ups, social media and casual attire.

However, etiquette still matters in business and can be a competitive advantage for you. Here is how:

Attire: How you look still matters. While John T. Molloy’s classic “Dress for Success” maybe outdated, someone who is dressed too sloppy or casual will still not be trusted as a person that is dressed as well as their customer. Appropriate attire choices also must made for video chats unless you want to show your customer your workout outfit.

Writing: Since so much of communication is done in short informal manner, there is greater chance of miscommunication. Being able to write effective email communications is still an important skill and requires increased practice. This can be done by sending an email to a customer and then following up immediately by phone to make sure that they understood exactly what you wrote.

Dining: A lot can be learned by having a meal with a business associate. People can win or lose a deal, promotion or job based on their table manners. This doesn’t necessarily mean using the right fork, but still includes RSVPs, keeping your napkin on your lap, elbows off the table, and chewing with your mouth closed. Not sure of your habits? Have a friend take note at your next lunch.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device): More companies are not issuing smart phones, but instead are having employees bring their own smart phones.  As a result, personal and business data are mixing on the same device. It is critical to set the rules in advance as to what type of access the employer has for inspection of that device and whether it can be wiped cleaned when that employee leaves.

Travel: More small companies are doing business in different countries.  They need to be aware of various business and dining customs, business hierarchies, displays of affection and alcohol use. Important customs vary by country and culture.

Social Networking: Many small business owners and employees have separate social media sites for business and personal use. However, their brand image on both sites need to be consistent since customers will do a web search that will cover all of them. Personal and professional lives can no longer be practically separated.

Also remember that different generations will prefer different etiquette so this will add to its overall complexity. A great guide for the small business owner is the 2014 version of Emily Post’s “The Etiquette Business Advantage

What business etiquette is most important to you?




 
Nextiva Logo

phone-icon Sales phone-icon Support
Nextiva is the leader in Business VoIP Services. Copyright 2014 Nextiva, All Rights Reserved,
Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy, Patents, Sitemap