Posts Tagged ‘Marketing’


Why Scary Sells

??????????????????????????????????????????????????Can you scare customers into buying your product? Fear can actually sell as much as sex or desire since it will trigger people to take action.

According to Lea Dunn of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business, when people feel alone and afraid, they form an emotional attachment to the brands around them. She states that in this heightened state, consumers are more likely to remember those products and think of them favorably. Dunn says this happens because fear induces a need for human connections and if there are no people present, products fill the gap. She believes this emotional attachment happens because people think the product actually “shared” that experience with them.

In works in many sales situations. Behavioral psychologist Dr. Wyatt Woodsmall said that “If you can find out what people’s worst nightmare is, camp out inside their nightmare…[they’ll] do anything…to get out of that situation.”

News broadcasts have peddled fear for years. An insider rallying cry of the media has always been, "If it bleeds, it leads".  Famous brands use fear all the time to sell their products. For example, L’Oreal’s tag line of “Because I’m Worth It” confronts self-loathing among women. FedEx’s “Absolutely, Positively Overnight” addresses the fear of missing a deadline. Nike’s “Just Do It” takes aim at missing out because the consumer is afraid.

Fortunately, you don't need to rob prospects to sell them a home security system. Here is how to scare customers into buying:

  • FUD. When I was at IBM in the 1980s, they told us that “no one ever got fired for buying IBM.” This concept helped because I had to sell against competitors whose products seemed technologically similar to ours but always much cheaper. I frequently used a technique that was called “FUD” (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) to direct the decision maker to buy IBM.  In my sales calls, I recounted all the things that could go wrong if he chose a competitor. Fortunately, the decision maker many times chose IBM, despite the fact that we were more expensive, because we were perceived as the low-risk alternative.
  • Deadlines. Consumers are afraid of missing a deadline. This could be an expiration date of an offer, a holiday calendar deadline or other imposed cutoff date. Dates will push consumers to take action. Note the surge of people signing up for insurance to comply with the Affordable Care Act on March 31.
  • VIP. Consumers want to be a part of “a club” that not everyone get into. Put of a gate and watch how many people want to get in. This is exactly what many buyers’ clubs like Costco do with their small membership fees. The marketing message is that the consumer will miss out on some incredible deals if they are not a member.

Fear-based marketing does not have to be all gloomy. Articulate the negative to what prospects are currently doing and provide a solution to alleviate that fear.


Work Your Biz Wednesday: Best Practices for Text Marketing Campaigns

Have you thought about using text marketing for your small business? Here are some tips for a successful campaign from The Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


What Color Should Your Logo Be?

Small business owners fret over what their logo looks like. They want it to be clean, cool or fancy. What they should really focus on is how it makes a customer feel since logos play a large role in their purchasing decisions. Researchers at the University of Amsterdam found that children as young as two years old could recall a logo and its product 67% of the time. By eight, 100 percent of children tested could associate the logo with the product.

???????????????????????????Brand logos are valuable property because they evoke emotions connected with buying. For the first time in the history of Interbrand’s Best Global Brands report, Apple was the top brand. Google jumped to number 2 and Coca-Cola, the brand that held the number one position for 13 years was number three. The total value of all 100 Best Global Brands was $1.5 trillion with the Google brand logo being worth over $100 billion alone.

According to a new research at Financesonline.com, colors evoke a specific emotional response from a customer. This is important since 75% of all buying decision are emotional.

Here are what specific colors mean:

Red means active, passionate, trustful, love, and intensity. Think Coca-Cola and Target. Red Bull wants customers to see their brand as intense and active.

Yellow means energy and joy. Think Ferrari, Shell and Best Buy. McDonalds wants customers to associate their brand with happiness.

Orange means creative, determined, joyful and the beach. It can stimulate mental activity. Think Fanta and Firefox. The Home Depot wants to help its customers be creative in the Do-It-Yourself market of home construction and repair.

Pink is often associated with feminine brands. It means love, warm, sexuality and nurturing. Think Barbie and T-Mobile. Oprah’s Oxygen network is aimed at women.

Blue means depth, stability, calm, trust, comfort, and reliability. Think Samsung, IBM, Intel, GE and Ford. When a customer buys from Nextiva, they know that their office communications will always be reliably delivered.

Green means relax, peaceful, hopeful and natural. Think Starbucks and BP. Heineken beer wants their customers to feel exactly this way.

Brown is associated with the Earth. It means reliability, support, dependability and grounded. Think Godiva Chocolate and M&Ms (at least the brown ones). UPS has become synonymous with this type of consistent reliability.

Black means formal, mystery, bold, luxurious and serious. Think Blackberry. Customers shop at Tiffany’s for that special occasion.

A logo should not just be “pretty or cool”. Determine what feeling do you want your brand to evoke? Choose your colors wisely.

Barry Moltz helps get small businesses unstuck. His new book, “How to Get Unstuck: 25 Ways to Get Your Business Growing Again” is now available. 


Work Your Biz Wednesday: 4 Ways to Kickstart Your Marketing Efforts

Marketing your small business doesn't have to be difficult! Here are 4 ways to jump start your marketing plan and boost your revenue from the Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


Work Your Biz Wednesday: How to Leverage a Daily Deal Promotion

In this week's Work Your Biz Wednesday video, Small Biz Lady Melinda Emerson gives you tips on leveraging a daily deal promotion through companies like Groupon and LivingSocial.


20 Words to Get Your Posts Read

The key to getting any business content read is its headline. Take a lesson from print media, articles with boring titles never get read. Here are 20 words to make sure that prospects and customers read what your company posts:

  1. Numbers:  3, 5, 7 or 10 are a clear winners. Even numbers are less popular. Every reader wants a simple step by step list to accomplish their task.
  2. Easier: They want your business to make it easier for them. They seek an easier way out or an easier way to solve their pain.
  3. Rock star: Most customers have a secret desire to be a famous rock star even if it is only in their immediate world. They will pay anyone to get there.
  4. Capture: The best word to help customers get what they desire. It denotes things that are not easy to accomplish.
  5. Killer: This is a powerful, yet controversial word. It can backfire if used in times of domestic violence.
  6. Secrets: Every customer wants to learn the secret formula that not everyone else knows so they can benefit from it.
  7. Stocksy_txp870288944a3000_Small_22647Perfection: Consumers are always striving for this ideal. They know they can’t really achieve it, but it does not stop them looking for help to get it.
  8. Quick: Customers have no time. They want something fast (see “Easy”). This can be learned from the popular fast and prepared food craze.
  9. Dangerous: Many customers lead fairly mundane lives and seek safety. They want to read about dangerous things they should avoid.
  10. Clever: Customers hope to gain an advantage by being cleverer than the next person. This is a quality that is almost universally admired.
  11. Next level: Every customer wants to go up, forward and to the next higher level. They will buy whatever can help them get there.
  12. Guarantee: This helps mitigate the risk a customer is taking in their purchase. If the results are “guaranteed”, they feel more comfortable to act.
  13. Boost: Customers want quick help to get higher. The “boost” is a popular and warm image from childhood.
  14. Latest: Many customers are addicted to the “shiny object syndrome” and always want the latest and greatest. Companies feed that desire.
  15. Mega: Americans always like things which are large. In fact, the bigger, the better. Many believe that a higher quantity means increased value.
  16. Absolutely: A better way of saying “the best”. It leaves no room for doubt.
  17. Ridiculous: Customers like to hear about the “crazy” so they can pass along these stories to friends and associates.
  18. VIP: Every customer wants to be part of something that not all people can join. It makes them feel special.
  19. Limited time: Customers will act if they believe there is scarcity.
  20. Worst: Unfortunately, people are more attracted to the negative, than the positive. This is the basis of the popularity of every reality TV show.

What are your best headline words?


Work Your Biz Wednesday: How to Provide Outstanding Customer Service

The real secret to keeping customers coming back is to deliver great customer service. Find out how to deliver the "wow" from Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson:


Work Your Biz Wednesday: 6 Reasons Why You Should Contact Your Customers

The most valuable thing in any business is your existing customers. Here are 6 reasons why you should contact them from Melinda Emerson, the Small Biz Lady.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Give Your Customer Service a Checkup

Is your customer service up to par? Even if your business starts off with stellar service, it’s easy for your standards to slip as your business grows and you become less hands-on with all aspects of the company. Plus, consumers’ standards for service are higher than they’ve ever been,–and they have many options if your business doesn’t live up to their expectations.

How can you make sure your customer service stays stellar day in and day out? Ask yourself these questions:

  • Is my website user-friendly? Can customers easily tell what to do when they visit your business website? Make sure key information, like your business’s phone number, hours, address and directions, are visible right near the top of the home page.
  • Stocksy_txpc1714160lD3000_Small_130635Is my physical location welcoming? A clearly-marked entrance; an inviting store window or lobby; and employees who make eye contact, smile and greet customers with a friendly welcome as they walk in the door all combine to kick the customer experience off on a positive note.
  • Are my employees empowered to give great service? If employees have to “get a manager” to make any exception to a rule, irate customers are likely to get even more annoyed. Set parameters, but within those guidelines, give your employees leeway to make their own decisions about how to satisfy a customer.
  • Are my employees educated about my product or service? These days, customers can instantly turn to the Internet on their smartphones to get a wealth of information about the products you sell—and the other companies that sell them. It’s crucial your employees know your wares thoroughly so they can answer questions, make suggestions and offer expert advice before customers turn to your competitors.
  • Do I listen as well as talk on social media? Social media is a great way to engage with customers, but make sure it’s not a one-way street. Don’t just share info about your business; also listen to what customers are saying about your business. If what they’re saying is negative or critical, or if a customer is asking for help, respond immediately and take steps to make changes.
  • Do I offer lots of customer service options? Customers today want choices in everything—even in how they communicate with your company. Offer as many options as possible for how you provide customer service—from in-person and by phone to email and live chat. If you have something for everyone, you’ll keep everyone happy. 



 
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