Posts Tagged ‘Marketing’


Mondays with Mike: 7 Tips For Making Your Employees Marketing Superstars

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you had a team of enthusiastic marketing superstars who promoted your brand everywhere they went?  Here’s a secret:  You can make it happen!  Consider the fact that every one of your employees interacts with dozens and dozens of people everyday, and you’re missing your opportunity if you don’t enlist them in your mission to promote your brand.  Here are some sure-fire strategies for making your employees part of your marketing strategy:

  1. Speak their language.  Every single member of your staff is motivated in a slightly different way.  Take the time to figure out what’s important to your employees, and you’ll be able to tell your story in a way that matters to them.  If you can sell your staff on your vision, they’ll sell it to your customers.
  2. Create the right climate.  Make sure that your staff understands that you’re not just in business for the bottom line.  Show the ways in which you enrich your community, whether it’s by providing necessary services or through your investment in community programs.  If your staff feels good about the work they’re doing, they’ll share their enthusiasm.
  3. Provide awesome wearables.  The key to this tip is making the wardrobe genuinely cool – something that your staff will actually choose to wear.  Your tagline or logo on a t-shirt becomes a walking billboard.  If you make sure your staff actually likes their company togs, then you’ll be sure that they won’t end up in the trunk of the car, where – let’s face it – they’re not doing you any good.
  4. Use social media.  Whether your run a caption contest or share pics of your staff wearing your logo in interesting locales, make sure you leverage the powerful tool provided by the various social media apps.  Folks love that fifteen minutes of fame – so why not use it?  Turning your brand into one that people have fun sharing increases your visibility and strengthens brand loyalty.
  5. Provide Halloween costumes.  Create a character that suits your company climate and offer your staff the chance to celebrate without having to stress over what to wear.  Whether you create a superhero – think something like Uber Geek if you’re an IT company or Grammar Nazi if you’re a PR firm – you’re injecting a little fun into your corporate image.
  6. Use every opportunity to advertise, no matter how small.  One of my favorite, often overlooked examples of an underused means of getting your company’s name out there is to make sure that your company wi-fi and your employees’ mobile hotspots are all branded with your company’s name.  The next time your sales rep is working and sipping a latte at Starbucks, everyone who logs on to the free wi-fi will see your company’s name.  Never miss a chance to make in impression.
  7. Don’t forget the hardware.  Don’t send your staff out with laptops that advertise for Apple; slap your awesome logo on everything that sits still long enough.  Your staff can make countless impressions just by toting gear that advertises for you.

Be open, and be creative!  Brands are built one impression at a time, and you have more opportunities than you realize.


BUBL: The Secret of Successfully Invading a Customer’s Space

Baby and mom with soap bubbles

Bubbles – (c) Micah Solomon micah@micahsolomon.com

About this series: This series of articles from Nextiva will help you grasp of the essentials of customer service: the principles and guidelines that will serve you well in any era, regardless of trends, changing technology, and a constantly evolving customer base. Our guide is Micah Solomon, customer service and customer experience consultant, author, and speaker.

Those customers who look so normal–to the untrained eye–as they wander around your establishment are actually each surrounded by a transparent protective bubble.

To be able to provide great customer service, your team needs to be aware of this phenomenon and be conscious of the extent to which a customer’s individual protective shell is open or closed at any particular moment. Learn to recognize when and when not to venture into the customer’s protective bubble–the invisible sanctuary within which the customer has expectations of solitude–and for how long.

Learn and remember the principles of this human force field by using my acronym “BUBL.”  

The BUBL method for starting, pacing, and concluding a service interaction

  • B Begin Immediately
  • U Uncode the guests    messages and pacing
  • B Break your schedule
  • L Leave room for more interaction

Let’s take these steps one by one.

B – Begin ImmediatelyThe guest expects service to begin the moment she comes into contact with the employee      

(Busy employees: Sometimes this needs to be accomplished even if you’re speaking with another customer; you may need to learn how to work with one customer while visually acknowledging the presence of a new arrival.)

Determining whether or not the customer actually considers contact to have been made for the purpose of soliciting service is a subtle part of this step. For example, if a guest catches a server’s eye, it may be merely accidental, but if the guest holds the server’s gaze, it usually means he’s expecting to be offered assistance.

U – Uncode: Decode the messages the customer is giving you about pacing, about their level of happiness or distress, etc. and adjust appropriately to their mood and timing. (This isn’t only detectable in person, by the way: such cues can be discerned on the phone, in live online chat, via videoconferencing, etc.)

(Yeah I know: I had to invent a word–“uncode”–to make my acronym work.  If I had stuck with D-Decode, the acronym would have been BDBL, which is actually fun to say, but maybe not so memorable.)

B – Break your scheduleYour customer has let you into their sanctuary for this moment. Drop what you’re doing and work on what they need. True service can never be slave to your checking things off in a predetermined order from a to-do list. Attending properly to a customer means adhering to the customers schedule, not the other way around. 

L -  Leave room for moreIs this really good-bye? Check before you conclude the interaction

It’s the service professional’s responsibility to ask if anything additional is needed, and, if not, to graciously thank the customer before leaving her in the sanctuary of her bubble. This is an important final principle: the ‘‘closing’’ of service. Too many service interactions end with a cold and impersonal ‘‘Bye,’’ or ‘‘OK,’’ or, far too frequently, nothing at all. The closing of service is as important as the opening. It is the last touch point, and it needs to be handled properly. Again, this principle can be applied in a chat sequence, a series of emails, or on the phone, as well as, of course, in person.

 ===

This is subtle stuff.  But its important stuff.  It needs to form a module of your training, with role-playing and reinforcement, and a significant part of your mindset when interacting with (or considering whether to interact with) your customers.


Mondays with Mike: 7 Crazy Ideas To Turn Your Customers Into Raving Fans

The far reach of social media has fundamentally altered the way in which we interact with one another.  Things happen lightning fast, and it’s commonplace to get moment-to-moment updates on what your friends are doing.  While you may believe that it is – in fact – possible to OD on never-ending selfies, the prevalence of digital photos and tweets that reach millions of followers is a huge opportunity for savvy entrepreneurs who are able to enlist their customers in building their brands.  Here’s how to convert your customers to your biggest fans:

  1. Have your clients do some of the work.  If you can find a way to let customers make doing business with you a unique and personalized experience, they’re far more likely to tell their friends about you.  The best recent example of this principle are the number of business popping up that provide detailed art instruction for a group of people to gather at a bar or restaurant and paint their own picture.  You see Facebook posts of smiling faces and proud amateur artists.  They’re selling the experience to their friends.
  2. Play hard to get.  The American Express Black Card is the best example bar none.  It’s obscenely expensive, but people fall all over themselves, coveting an invitation to open one, and only a few customers ever receive that invitation.  Creating a sense of exclusivity makes your product that much more desirable.
  3. Deny your own existence.  One of the reasons there was so much buzz about the Amex Black Card when it was created was because Amex refused to confirm the card’s existence.  They relied on the excitement of gossip and speculation to generate interest.
  4. ????????????????Encourage tattoos.  I know this tactic may sound extreme, but when folks start permanently applying your logo to their bodies, you’ve officially arrived.  Associating your brand with a lifestyle and developing a great logo is a good start.  Think no one would ever ink a logo?  Look around you at the beer labels, band logos, and Harley Davidson tattoos that are out there.  It’s possible.
  5. Go underground.  Throw exclusive parties for your very best customers – parties that they must be invited to attend.  Offering special perks for invitation only rewards clubs makes customers crave that favored status.
  6. Put your customers through boot camp.  The idea here is to have a series of steps that customers have to go through in order to achieve a special status.  Give them special status and reward them with exclusive offers that are available only to the elite customers who’ve been dedicated enough to reach your upper echelon.  Give customers a shirt or a car magnet that boasts about their status, and you’re generating interest everywhere your customer goes. 
  7. Create an annual event.  Start a tradition that anchors your company as a valuable member of your community.  Whether you sponsor a fall festival or a public Easter Egg hunt, giving your community something to look forward to creates lasting, positive associations for your company.

So the real secret of all of these techniques is what happens afterwards.  By creating loyal, dedicated fans of your brand, you’re inevitably creating brand ambassadors who will Tweet, Instagram, and Facebook about your company, spreading the word with every like, share, or comment.  That’s why these raving fans are so valuable – they become your cheerleaders and enthusiastically help build your brand.  


Are Smart Phones Killing your Employees’ Soft Skills?

?????????????????????????????????????????If anyone tries to convince you that the abbreviated language known as “social media slang” is appropriate for business, DBTS (translated: don’t believe that stuff).  I’m not saying that it has no use — it might be helpful if used judiciously in a tweet from your company Twitter account or in a quick text message.  But anyone who represents your company needs the capacity to write correctly — and exercise a degree of courtesy and respect during face-to-face communication.  Unfortunately, smart phone mania may be robbing younger workers of these abilities, known as “soft skills.”

Of course, during a time when customers want everything right now, employees with 24/7 connection via smart phones can be major assets to your business. But just as you have to train them about the processes that they need to know to do their jobs, you may need to include a little education in soft skills as well.

Re-teach the Basic Writing Skills That They Have Forgotten from School

These days, no one expects electronic messages to be error-free.  In fact, now that many email messages are written on smart phones, many people put a tag at the end, warning, “Sent from my smart phone.  There will be typos.”  But when typos, misspellings or grammatical errors make it into formal business documents such as bids and proposals, your business can be significantly affected.  At the very least, unprofessional wording can alienate prospective customers.  Even worse, your business can take a major financial hit when an unclear sentence is misinterpreted to your company’s detriment.

Everyone in your company needs to adhere to basic writing standards.  They also need to understand that spell check is an absolute necessity, but proofreading is equally important (unless you have managed to remove every dirty term from the word processing dictionary).  For formatting and overall tone, you can provide them with samples of great documents or even a style guide for documents.  But until they have your complete confidence, have a designated person with strong writing skills review all documents and have the employees make corrections so that they can learn from their mistakes.

Texting Does Not Replace Face-to-Face Communication

The brevity of a 140-character tweet or a text message does not lend itself to highly courteous communication.  Tweets in particular are known for their often-snarky tone.  But when your employees interact with the public, you don’t want anyone to flash back to a certain soup seller from Seinfeld. Your employees may need a few verbal communication lessons in a safe environment before you release them to represent your company in the real world.

Role play sessions can be fun (or at least tolerable) and educational for employees.  Whether you set up activities in lunch sessions (you bring the pizza) or as part of company meetings, everyone can learn something new about interacting with others.  You can run the gamut of scenarios — from greeting customers at the door to cold-calling prospective customers.  Then, encourage group discussions to gain benefits from the viewpoints of a variety of people with their own personalities and sensitivities.

Everyone Benefits from Feedback

You have probably heard the old adage, “praise in public, criticize in private,” but well-placed public critiques can help improve the communication skills of your entire work force.  Unless every employee is a Miss Manners fan, there may be occasions when you receive a valid customer complaint.  Of course, you don’t want to gather the troops together to announce that Customer A complained because John said this or Mary did that.  But complaints can point out the need for more finesse in one area or another, and everyone can benefit from this type of feedback.  By all means, make it public.

Soft Skills Begin in the Workplace

Putting a group of employees in close quarters for 40 or more hours each week can add stress to the environment.  Unless you want your workplace atmosphere to resemble a dysfunctional family Thanksgiving dinner, everyone in your company will benefit by learning how to communicate effectively.  AAMOF (as a matter of fact), they may be 4ever gr8ful.


Buzz vs. Staying Power: Creating a Customer Experience They Want to Come Back To

About this series: This series of articles from Nextiva will help you grasp of the essentials of customer service: the principles and guidelines that will serve you well in any era, regardless of trends, changing technology, and a constantly evolving customer base. Our guide is Micah Solomon, customer service and customer experience consultant, author, and speaker.

 

Buzz is a mysterious, magical substance. It's what gets customers to your establishment in the first place. 

Books have been written about this mysterious force. But not by me. 

boy looks in window of closed toy store / (c) 2014 Micah Solomon micah@micahsolomon.com

(c) micah@micahsolomon.com

Because buzz only gets you so far, and only for so long.  Literally speaking, it  only gets them to the front door, to try you that first time.

Far be it from me to say that buzz isn't important; Obviously, getting prospective customers interested in what you do is an important first step.  But it's not enough to build a business on, any more than building a business on Groupon discounts is a long-term strategy.

What you need is staying power.  Something that gives customers a desire to return. 

And the best model for this is a vision of home. 

Here’s what I mean: If you want your customers to return over and over, you need to consciously create an environment/product/process/service that “feels like home” to them.

Now, if you think about it, customers don’t actually want the place they do business with to “be like home”– the home of the typical adult, with dirty dishes in the sink, deferred maintenance up the yin yang.  So I use this “home” term advisedly and with some apprehension. 

At home as a typical adult, you are in control, but only on a self-serve basis. In your childhood home (optimally), it was a different sort of experience. Food appeared at mealtimes. You didn’t have to worry about shopping for personal items. When light bulbs blew out, new ones replaced them. When you left in the morning for school, your parents were genuinely saddened by your departure, and they looked forward to seeing you again. Your personal preferences were well known and were ‘’magically’’ taken into consideration.

So how does this apply to building staying power at your business?  Well, spend a lot of time greeting your customers enthusiastically when they return.  Pay attention to how you bid them good-bye when they leave. Make sure that what they typically order is already pre-selected for them and available without any—any—hassle at all. 

This builds an environment that a customer will choose to return to, over and over and over. Where they’re known.  Where they’re welcomed.  Where things work.  Where they not only can get what they want, but where you know what they want before they even have to ask for it.

This is the ultimate way to acknowledge a human being, in this case a customer.

© 2014 Micah Solomon


How to Lower Your Bounce Rate on Your Small Business Website

???????You have a beautifully designed website. Check. Targeted keywords on the website. Check. You have a way to capture email addresses on your website. Check. So why aren’t you getting more customers from your small business website? You might have a decent flow of people visiting your site, but if they’re not converting to sales, it’s time to look at the reasons why. Start by examining your bounce rate.

What the Heck is a Bounce Rate?

Just like a shiny rubber ball, your bounce rate happens when people land on your site and then quickly bounce away. You can find your bounce rate by looking at your Google Analytics once e month. The technical definition for bounce rate: the percent of people who leave your site after visiting just one page. The higher the bounce rate, the more people are leaving rather than looking around. The average bounce rate is 50%. Here’s an illustration:

  1. Someone searches for something they’re looking for online.
  2. Your site shows up in those search results. They click your link.
  3. They land on your home page, don’t see what they expected, then leave.

So the question is: why are they not finding what they want? Why do they leave before even exploring your site? Typically there are a few reasons for this.

1. Your Design is Unappealing

While you wouldn’t expect a visitor to your site to hold bad design against you, first impressions really do matter. And if your website hasn’t been updated for 5 years, or is cluttered with ads or popups, there’s not much you can do to convince people to stay, even if your products are amazing.

Fortunately, there’s an easy fix for this: get a new design! Website design has come way down in pricing, and there are even templates and platforms you can customize and manage yourself.

2. Poor Keywords

Let’s say the name of your company is Red Ball Marketing. You don’t actually sell red balls, but people still land on your site looking to buy red balls. You’re probably not willing to change your company name, but you can put more effort into appearing in search results for better keywords. You should know your top 6 keywords. If you haven’t really put much thought into your keywords, you’ll get a mix of traffic of people looking for lots of things, but not really what you sell.

Figure out the top keywords your audience is searching for and make sure you use them throughout your site, especially in your blog titles and static pages. For your marketing company, that would be terms like:

  • Content marketing
  • Marketing firm
  • Marketing for small business

If you continue to work to build your presence online with those keywords, as well as blogging, you should start to move up those search results and attract people who are looking for what you’re selling.

3. You Lack Calls to Action

Now that search engines have led leads to your website, it’s your job to make them drink the koolaid. If your home page lacks any call to action, how will visitors know what you want them to do? Consider your call to action your instructions for visitors to your site. Do you want them to:

  • Buy from you?
  • Get a free quote?
  • Subscribe to your newsletter?
  • Download a free ebook?

Then let them know! Make your call to action bold, colored differently from surrounding text, and simple to follow.

Your website holds the potential to convert visitors into customers. But you’ve got to ensure you’re targeting the right people with your content and keywords, and that your site is an inviting place to shop. Then you can lower that bounce rate and increase sales!


Mondays with Mike: Improve Your Client Relationships With Social Media

In the olden days – you know, before Facebook – the success of a marketing campaign was often simply a measure of how much money you had to spend.  After all, we know that if you repeat something often enough, then people will believe it. 

My, how times have changed.

People consume information so differently now, that the weight of a single television commercial or magazine ad is often diluted by all of the impressions that we get from other forms of media, and that’s a huge opportunity for small businesses.  You can build your brand without investing tons of money, if you’re willing to invest a little time.  Consumers are looking for a genuine connection and a way to interact with a company, and you can give them what they want by using social media.

There are lots of serious minded folks who dismiss Facebook and Twitter as frivolous fads – wasters of time and energy.  What those folks don’t know is that their company is most likely already being discussed on social media.  Whether you run a restaurant or a carpet cleaning service, chances are good that there are online reviews of your business.  If that doesn’t scare you, it should.  The conversation is happening.  The only question is whether you want to participate and start to shape that conversation into one that presents your company in its best light.

Responding to reviews on Yelp or Trip Advisor is a great opportunity to thank happy patrons for their business, and it’s also a chance for you to see what your customers didn’t like about their experience.  If it’s appropriate, a public acknowledgement of their complaint and a promise to make it right shows that you value your customers and are invested in providing excellent service.

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Social media also gives you a chance to invite prospective customers in for a virtual visit.  You can post pictures of your daily special at the restaurant, or you can write a quick blog post about why you’ve chosen a particular brand of environmentally safe cleaners for use in your customers’ homes.  You can run silly little contests on your Facebook page, inviting folks to provide suggestions for your newest drink creation or offering a freebie for the 1000th person who likes your Facebook page.  The idea is to get your customers involved on your social media platforms.  Invite them to share pictures of your business on Instagram, and make sure you monitor all of the possible sites that might have reviews of your business.  It’s possible that you’ll luck into some great, unsolicited free advertising, but if you carefully cultivate your social media presence, you’ll end up interacting with far more consumers.

Your company’s reputation depends on your relationship with your customers, and you can manage that relationship – in part, anyway – by using the free social media tools available to you.  Whether you’re in love with Facebook or not, you’re missing out if you don’t acknowledge the powerful opportunities that it provides you.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How to Develop a Content Marketing Strategy

Are you using content marketing in your small business? If you ever write blog posts or articles for your business website, send out email newsletters or even post on social media, the answer is yes. Content marketing means creating content (text, visuals or both) and sharing it with your current and prospective customers through your website, social media or elsewhere online.

Content marketing is becoming more important as a marketing strategy. Last year, 90 percent of business owners in the Content Marketing Survey Report from Econsultancy and Outbrain predicted content marketing would be more important to business in 2014. What separates successful content marketers from those who try and fail? Having a content marketing strategy is crucial.

With just 38 percent of those in the survey reporting they have a content marketing strategy, developing one will clearly put you ahead of the pack. So how can you create a successful content marketing strategy?

  • Set goals. Figure out what you want your content to accomplish, whether that’s educating potential customers, getting existing customers to buy more from you, spreading the word about your business or establishing you as a thought leader in your industry.
  • Create quality content. Good-quality content is key to success. If you don’t have the talent or staff in-house to create good content, use sites such as Freelancer.com or Elance.com to find qualified content marketing writers.
  • Mix it up. Content isn’t just words—in fact, photos and videos often get more attention. Consider posting pictures of your employees or customer events, videos demonstrating your product in action or behind-the-scenes interviews with employees or satisfied customers to add excitement to your content.

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Mondays with Mike: Keep ‘Em Coming Back – Rich, Relevant Content

???????????????????Even if you don’t have a product that you sell online, nearly every business benefits from having a website.  It’s how you build your brand, reach new consumers, and share the important details about your business.  Whether you build it yourself or hire a web designer, though, getting the site up and running is only the first step. 

If you want repeat visits to your website, you have to give folks a reason to come back.  Especially if you’re not using the site for online sales, you’ll find that providing articles or blog posts with fresh and interesting content is one of the best ways to get consumers in the habit of coming back.  If your customers look forward to the new content you post, you have a much better shot at creating a lasting impression of your brand.

The key is to make your content fresh and relevant, though, and that’s no easy task.  Entrepreneurs with new websites often worry that they’ll have trouble continually coming up with a new story to tell.  Here’s the secret:  you don’t have to tell a new story with every post; you simply have to tell the same story in a fresh way. 

Technology is your friend.

Let’s say that your family owns a farm – you have orchards, a bakery, a produce stand, and wagon rides so that customers can pick their own fresh fruit.  You want your website to tell your story and to encourage folks to support your small local business.  But what will you write about in your blog?

You start out with blog posts about what’s in season, but it doesn’t have to end there.  You can include recipes that feature your fresh produce, and move on to other topics.  Take your website visitors on a virtual tour of your bakery, or of the farm, using Skype.  Interview your visitors and get their permission to include their favorite parts of their visit in a video collection.  Show off the new water recycling system you’ve installed and take the opportunity to talk about sustainable farming and how important it is.  Invite a local chef to feature your produce in their restaurant and post the menus on your website.  Create an infographic that talks about the nutritional value of fresh fruit, or that shows a breakdown of all the crops you raise and where you have them planted on the farm.

You’re telling the same story about a hardworking, family-owned business, but you’re using technology to share that story in fresh and interesting ways.  Your website analytics can give you valuable information about which pages get the most views and are shared with others, and you can use that feedback to tailor future content.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is an important tool – so important that lots of websites simply hire someone to spin (rewrite) articles to fool Google into thinking that the site is materially different from the last time it was crawled.  The benefit of creating genuine rich content is that you don’t have to fool a search engine – your site actually has new, relevant, and engaging content.  There’s so much more to building a vibrant, successful website than simply securing a web address and slapping up some graphics.  If you’re not using the incredibly power of your site to tell your unique story, then you’re missing the boat.




 
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