Posts Tagged ‘Human resources’


Don’t Do This! 5 Mistakes You Can Avoid When Handling Your Staff

I’ve hired and fired enough people to know what works and what doesn’t in terms of managing staff.  When you’re dealing with people, things can be unpredictable, but I’ve learned a few lessons that always hold true.  Here’s my top list of things you should NOT do when you’re dealing with your staff.

  1. Expect the same dedication you bring to the office.  Your company is your baby.  It’s your dream, your vision, and your potential payoff.  Your staff – even the most vibrant, engaged employees – are in it for the paycheck.  They don’t stand to gain as much as you do if you succeed, and they don’t see the same value you do in sacrificing their energy, free time, and income.  If you expect your staff to give up their lives in service of your vision, you’re asking too much, and you’re certain to be disappointed.  Be realistic about what you can expect from your staff.
  2. Give a lofty title to a rookie.  In the absence of tons of free money, entrepreneurs sometimes have to be creative when it comes to rewarding their staff.  Don’t attempt to compensate your staff by giving them titles they haven’t earned.  If you hire on an admin to handle your corporate Facebook and Twitter account and put “Chief Marketing Officer” on the new business card, you’re setting yourself up for problems.  If your new Chief Marketing Officer learns that his title usually comes with a much higher salary out in the marketplace, he’s likely to become disgruntled and feel like he’s undercompensated.  Give your staff authentic titles.
  3. Not handling reviews on time.  Your employees know their start dates, and you should too.  Not only do formal, regular reviews give you a chance to address any problems, but they also give your staff valuable feedback on what they’re doing right.  Don’t overlook an opportunity to praise your staff.
  4. Train and pray.  It’s expensive to hire and fire staff, and one of the most commonly made mistakes in the way business owners handle their staff is to skimp on the training.  If you send an employee out with inadequate training, not only are you running the risk of disappointing your customers, but you’re also fostering uncertainty in your new hire.  Let your staff know that you care enough about them and your clients to train and support new hires properly.
  5. Messing up the first day.  Your new hire starts forming an impression of you and your company the second they walk through the door on the first day on the new job.  You can either impress your new employee with business cards, formal, supportive training, and a schedule for the first day, or you can put them in a corner and let them fill out paperwork.  Start your staff off right – thoughtfully, deliberately, and with a warm welcome that lets your employees know you’re glad they’re there.

Hiring and firing employees is time consuming and can be very costly.  When you add in the immeasurable value of great staff, you’ll realize right away that making a conscious effort to handle your staff properly will pay dividends.  You’ll be able to retain great staff and continue to give your customers great value, and you’ll also free yourself up to develop new business, rather than dealing with staff troubles.

10-24 handing employees small


Developing a Quality Employee Review Process

10-12 employee reviewIt’s in your own best interest to nurture your staff and make sure they’re productive and thriving at your company. After all, turnover costs you money, in searching for a new hire and training him, so you’re better off making sure the staff you have is optimized. One way to do that is to set up an employee review process that not only helps you, but also helps your team understand your expectations and strive to meet them.

Set Them Up Regularly

You can adhere to the typical once-a-year employee review schedule…or you can meet more often, like two or three times a year. More frequent (and more informal) reviews can keep your employees on track to goals, and leave less time in between reviews so they stay motivated.

Think about your timing: is December really the best time for your reviews, given that half the staff is out of the office, and you’re time-crunched getting work done before the end of the year? Instead, schedule them based on their hire date so you don’t have dozens of reviews to get through in a single month.

Establish Goals Together

As I said, your review process should benefit you and your employee. Discuss goals together that each individual staff member can strive for. Perhaps you’d like to see one turn out two extra reports a week. That’s a reasonable goal.

Or if he’s angling for a promotion, make a list of goals he needs to accomplish in order for you to consider him for that promotion. This makes getting a promotion very black and white: if he can’t successfully accomplish the list, he won’t be eligible for something he wants.

Provide Constructive Criticism

This isn’t a time to sugarcoat your honest assessment of an employee’s work. Nor is it an opportunity to berate someone if they haven’t lived up to your expectations. Emotions shouldn’t be in the review process.

Find ways to constructively tell an employee about something you want him to work on. For example, if you find his work as of late to not be the quality it used to be, you could say:

“A few months ago, you were delivering top-notch work, and I was so impressed. But lately it feels like you haven’t been putting in that same effort. Is there a reason why?”

This approach does several things. First, it puts him at ease, because you start off with an honest compliment. It also opens the door for further conversation. Maybe he recently had a baby, and his lack of sleep is attributing to his lower quality work. Or maybe he didn’t feel you appreciated his efforts, so he slacked off a bit. Taking the right approach can mean the difference between you putting your employee up in arms and actually getting to the bottom of what’s changed.

Develop Metrics

The only way you’ll be able to measure where your employee is next year is if you first set up a baseline to measure against. Consider it your report card. Pick the areas that are most important to you (timeliness, quality work, motivation are a few examples) and give him a number, 1-10, for each. Then next year you can compare the new numbers to the previous ones and see if there has been an improvement.

Staying in touch with your staff this way helps you avoid potential loss of productivity and keeps your staff better, now that they know your expectations.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 4 Customer Service Lessons From the Health Insurance Industry

???????????????????????????????????????????????Do you ever have to call your health insurance plan to get information about benefits or contest a claim? If you’re like most of us, you put off these calls as long as possible because you know it’s going to be a nightmare. But surprisingly, there are some lessons—both positive and negative—you can learn from making a customer service call to your health insurer.

Recently, my company had to switch health plans and Karen, one of my business partners (she handles our HR issues) spent quite a bit of time on the phone with our insurance company. Here’s what she learned that can help your business:

  1. Make sure your business website provides the information customers need. Armed with names of several insurance plans, Karen thought it would be a simple matter to look up the details and compare them. Think again: “I couldn’t find information about any of the plans online,” she says. Today, many customers prefer to do their pre-purchase research online. Providing basic information, downloadable PDFs of complex information or comparison charts of different products and services are easy ways to give customers what they need. (Most automotive websites do a great job of this, by the way.)
  2. Provide several ways to contact you. With only one basic phone number on the website, Karen was transferred several times, spending 45 minutes on hold before she even got to the correct department. If your business has multiple phone numbers for different types of customers (such as residential and commercial accounts), be sure they’re all clearly posted and differentiated on your website.
  3. Always get, and give, contact information. As soon as your customer service reps start a phone conversation with a customer, always have them ask for the person’s phone number immediately in case the call gets cut off. The insurance company didn’t do this, and after Karen finally got connected to the right department, the call cut off and she had to start all over again. When transferring a customer, have customer service reps give the person the phone number and/or extension you’re transferring them to, in case the same thing happens.
  4. Go above and beyond. After all this frustration, you might think Karen was ready to give up on the idea of health insurance altogether. Not so, because she finally got through to a customer service rep who went above and beyond. After Karen explained she’d been transferred all over and begged not to be transferred again, the woman patiently walked her through the company’s website, waiting while she went through every step, and even helped her Google information that couldn’t be found on the website. Even though this wasn’t her department, the rep sympathized with my Karen’s frustrations, helped her as far as she could and then connected her with an insurance broker to answer all the remaining questions.

The end result? Despite spending two hours on the phone, Karen ended the call feeling good about the company—all because of that one customer service rep who helped her.


Win More Customers with These Body Language Adjustments

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????Small business owners get out of practice. They spend so much time in their offices and online that they sometimes forget how to act when they come face to face with a prospect or customer. While many professionals spend time practicing what they will say in a meeting, few focus on what their body language looks like. This is unfortunate since studies show over half how we communicate comes from our facial expression and body positions.

Here is what you can do to win over more customers:

  1. Smile. The first thing a person sees when meeting is your facial expression. This begins on your approach and will set the tone for the entire meeting. Prepare for this by remembering positive things that make you smile about a minute before beginning that meeting. This will make smiling more unconscious and authentic. In the meeting, looking someone straight in the eye and smiling will instantly make them more comfortable. It will also make you more likable which increases the chance of a sale.
  2. Sit up straight. Customers get more confidence from people that hold themselves up straight then those that slouch. Most small business owners have poor posture from being at computers all day or talking on a smart phone. Before the meeting, stand with feet shoulder width apart and get a grounded footing. Then stand straight as if someone had a string attached to the top of your head. This will help you stand, walk and sit straighter. Customers will buy more from people that show confidence in themselves with this type of posture.
  3. Lean in. The physical orientation of two people together says a lot about their relationship. Slouching back in a chair or sitting straight on the end doesn’t make the other person comfortable. Instead, leaning forward will engage people in any conversation. This also enables you to talk more softly so people need to tune in to what you are saying. Leaning in can also show a greater intent to listen which the customer will appreciate. However, be careful not to invade their personal space. Also, try to sit side by side with someone you are trying to win over rather than two opposing chairs or across a desk or a table. This will help them feel you are both on the “same side”.
  4. Matching body language. When you “mirror” similar body language to the customer, it builds feelings of trust because it generates unconscious positive feelings of affirmation. It will make them think you agree with what they are saying which increases the likability factor.  This does not mean that every time the customer crosses their leg, you need to do the same. Instead, look for body language cues to copy over the course of your meeting.

Remember that business body language differs by culture. All of this takes practice so always make it a standard part of your pre-meeting preparation.


Mondays with Mike: How To Vaccinate Your Job Applicants

I’ll start this article with a nod to Dan and Chip Heath, whose book, Decisive, has had an enormous impact on the way I handle making important decisions.  I’ve learned over the years that while sometimes all you can do is trust your gut instinct, there’s a lot to be said for making decisions as deliberately as possible.  The vaccination technique in the hiring process plays the very important role of eliminating a number of the poor options, leaving you with the applicants who are best suited for your position.

Here’s how the vaccination technique works:  Let’s say that you’re hiring for a customer service position.  Before you write your job ad, think back to the problems you’ve had with previous employees in that position and make a list of the parts of the job that presented the biggest challenges.  Now, include those parts of the job description in the ad.  If it feels like you’re warning people off the job, then you’re doing it right!  Your goal should be to accurately describe the job, warts and all.

Why would you want to focus on the difficult aspects?

Stocksy_txpbfc73dd2sR8000_Small_175628You’re inoculating your applicants.  You’re giving the candidates who don’t want to deal with irate customers’ complaints a reason not to apply.  You’re telling the folks who don’t ever want to work weekends that they’re not going to be happy in the position.  You’re essentially screening out unsuitable folks so you don’t have to waste time interviewing, hiring, training, and ultimately firing them. 

My favorite way to write an ad is as a challenge to just the right candidate.  Emphasize that it’s a very special person you’re looking for, with just the right unique skill set.  People who read your ad and say “That’s me!” are the ones you’re looking for.  They’re dedicated and prepared to face the challenges of being your customer service rep.

In addition to screening out candidates who aren’t a good fit for your job, vaccination also ensures that your applicants know what they’re getting onto.  They won’t legitimately be able to complain that they didn’t know they’d have to work evenings and holidays if you included those details in the ad.  Think about the alternative – you gush about what a great company you’ve built, how wonderful the staff is, and how rewarding the work is – some employees may feel like they’ve been misled when they encounter their first real challenge.  Oversell the difficulties and let them discover for themselves how wonderful your company is.

When you’ve weeded out the unsuitable candidates, what you’re left with is a short list of much better options, and that means that you’ll be able to make a better decision since you’ve taken the time to deliberately sift out the cream of the crop before you even schedule the first interview.  Good decision making is a habit, and eliminating unwise choices is one of the surest ways to improve your long term outcomes and bring on staff who’s in it for the long haul.  


Does Business Etiquette Still Matter?

?????????????In recent years, business has become very casual. Gone are the work days of suits, stationary, big titles, corner offices, secretaries, and power lunches. Small business is now done through email, video chats, texting, meet ups, social media and casual attire.

However, etiquette still matters in business and can be a competitive advantage for you. Here is how:

Attire: How you look still matters. While John T. Molloy’s classic “Dress for Success” maybe outdated, someone who is dressed too sloppy or casual will still not be trusted as a person that is dressed as well as their customer. Appropriate attire choices also must made for video chats unless you want to show your customer your workout outfit.

Writing: Since so much of communication is done in short informal manner, there is greater chance of miscommunication. Being able to write effective email communications is still an important skill and requires increased practice. This can be done by sending an email to a customer and then following up immediately by phone to make sure that they understood exactly what you wrote.

Dining: A lot can be learned by having a meal with a business associate. People can win or lose a deal, promotion or job based on their table manners. This doesn’t necessarily mean using the right fork, but still includes RSVPs, keeping your napkin on your lap, elbows off the table, and chewing with your mouth closed. Not sure of your habits? Have a friend take note at your next lunch.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device): More companies are not issuing smart phones, but instead are having employees bring their own smart phones.  As a result, personal and business data are mixing on the same device. It is critical to set the rules in advance as to what type of access the employer has for inspection of that device and whether it can be wiped cleaned when that employee leaves.

Travel: More small companies are doing business in different countries.  They need to be aware of various business and dining customs, business hierarchies, displays of affection and alcohol use. Important customs vary by country and culture.

Social Networking: Many small business owners and employees have separate social media sites for business and personal use. However, their brand image on both sites need to be consistent since customers will do a web search that will cover all of them. Personal and professional lives can no longer be practically separated.

Also remember that different generations will prefer different etiquette so this will add to its overall complexity. A great guide for the small business owner is the 2014 version of Emily Post’s “The Etiquette Business Advantage

What business etiquette is most important to you?


Using Internet Monitoring Software to Increase Employee Productivity

Stocksy_txpe4825224HV7000_Small_184198Small business owners used to be able to walk around their offices to see the work that their employees where doing. But as organizations are have become increasingly virtual, it is now impossible for a manager to accomplish this since work is now done at client sites, coffee shops, and homes. As a result, many small business owners are up at night wondering if employees are working or just playing video games during the day.

Productivity is being impacted. A 2013 salary.com survey showed that 58% of employees waste up to 60 minutes per day on non-business related websites during the work day, not including lunch or break times.

One solution to this problem is to use an internet monitoring software service for employees. Web monitoring and filtering is traditionally installed to block adult content, phishing sites, or to reduce time wasted on shopping and social media sites. One company, Rawstream is a cloud-based web monitoring and filtering product that helps employees spend their time online productively, profitably and safely.

This tool shows the exact amount of time a user spends looking at a particular website. It gives managers the visibility to see what employees are working on in real time no matter where they are via the application dashboard and report generation function. It also allows managers to see what files are being put into sharing apps like Dropbox, Google Drive, One Drive, and Cubby. The software shows who is using the content sharing apps and lists any files shared that break company policy to protect against the sharing of files containing sensitive data such as credit card numbers. More importantly, employees have access to their own web usage reports, so they can examine their own habits and learn to use their time on the internet more effectively. Managers and employees can also set time limits to access to sites or block certain sites.

There are several benefits for small businesses to use web filtering solutions. Company production can increase when employees are not wasting time on websites that have no business value. Additionally, managers can have more confidence in allowing employees to work off site, giving employees the flexibility to work in an environment they can be most productive.

Too “Big Brother” for you? Remember that just letting employees know that the company is using an Internet monitoring tool will actually boost their productivity.


How to Make Great Hires in Your Small Business

Stocksy_txp9a65d8f63x6000_Small_34724As your small business grows, you begin to consider hiring help to take some of the workload and stress off of you. After all, if you can delegate some of the work that isn’t required to be done by you, you free yourself up to work on tasks that generate revenue. These tasks include things such as developing your company’s overall strategy, scheduling pitch meetings or being the face people see when they walk in your door.

That being said, moving into the land of becoming an employer is far from easy. Turnover in industries like restaurants can be shockingly high, at around 60%, and every time you hire an employee that will leave after a few short months, you’ve got to invest more time and money in finding a replacement.

These tips will alleviate some of these headaches and help you make great hires in your small business.

1. Know What You’re Looking For

The more specific you are in your hiring needs, the better you will be able to find it. Start by determining whether you even need a full-time employee. Possibly you only need a little help, which can be fixed by hiring a part-timer or a freelancer or agency who can take on project work like writing or design.

Then, decide what skills and experience you need. This will help you write a concise job description that will only attract the people that are qualified for the role you’re seeking to hire. Consider:

  • Any special skills that will make the job easier
  • Experience you want in a given industry
  • Job history working in similar positions

Obviously, if you’re hiring an ice cream scooper for the summer, the requirements will be lower than if you are hiring a marketing manager, but it’s still important to determine the qualities the person should have. Ideally, you want people who are hard workers and are committed to your company, who are looking for a job they can grow from over a long period of time.

2. Look in the Right Places

Job boards are the easy (and rather lazy) choice for employers to find employees, but fewer employees are finding value in the masses of unqualified resumes they get as a result. Many call job boards a “cattle call.”

Did you realize 92% of companies use social media for recruiting? Social media may be the right place to begin your search if you’re looking for professionals specializing in marketing or business services.

And don’t overlook your own local network. You may know people who can refer the perfect candidate to you, and since referrals tend to retain employees longer (46% after one year compared to only 22% from job boards), your golfing buddy might be your ticket to finding an employee who will stick with you.

You can also work with a recruiter, especially if you’re seeking to hire a professional with highly-specific skills. While a recruiter will take a bite out of your budget, it may take him less time to find the best talent for the job than it would you.

3. Make Your Company Enticing

Remember: job candidates will be interviewing you just as much as you them. And with unemployment less of a threat than it was a few years ago, they can often afford to be picky about where they work. Make sure your company is positioned to appeal to them.

You can’t expect someone accepting an entry-level position to want to stay in that role for years, so ensure that you have a clear path to growth so that when they’re ready to move up the ladder, they don’t have to leave your company to do so.

Also look at your employee benefits offerings. Are you competitive against what other local businesses provide their staff? Health insurance, vacation time, and other perks should be included in your hiring budget and plan, and should be appealing enough to make anyone clamor to work for you.

Part of finding and keeping good employees is doing your best to clearly identify what you’re looking for in a hire. The rest comes from solid management and providing that employee every reason to want to continue working for you.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Could Seniors Be Your Secret Customer Service Weapon?

Stocksy_txpbe336fabXT6000_Small_6767There’s a reason Walmart hires senior citizens as greeters at its stores: Seniors who are seeking employment are generally “people persons” who like socializing and engaging with others. That’s one of the findings of a survey by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) that asked hiring managers about hiring senior citizens.

If you’re looking to enhance your company’s customer service, hiring seniors could be a great idea. Here are a few of the reasons managers in the SHRM survey say seniors are valuable employees:

  • Seniors tend to be more patient than younger people when dealing with customers.
  • Because seniors have a lot of life experience, they’re often good at coming up with solutions to problems.
  • Hiring seniors who have past experience in your industry enables you to tap into their decades of knowledge.
  • Seniors often enjoy mentoring or passing their expertise on to younger employees.
  • If your business relies on referrals or word-of-mouth to gain new customers, you’ll be able to tap into seniors’ vast networks of contacts from years in the work force.
  • Seniors typically aren’t dealing with children at home, and they may be widowed or widowers, so they have more free time to dedicate to their jobs.
  • Most seniors have a strong work ethic and are highly reliable.

How can you make the most of seniors at your business?

  • Take advantage of their natural skills and past experience. A senior may not do as well in a fast-paced environment. You can still tap into the senior employee’s abilities by having younger workers “triage” customer service calls and pass them on to the senior employee to handle in detail. This way, customers feel they are being responded to quickly, but also feel cared for by the detail-oriented senior employees.
  • Train them on technology to get them up to speed. Although they didn’t grow up with technology, seniors who are in the work force are typically eager to learn. Most seniors use the Internet, email and social media in their personal lives, so you won’t be starting totally from scratch.
  • Treat them with respect. Give seniors an opportunity to share their insights and experiences with younger employees on your team. Their approach to solving customer problems will likely shed new light on common issues your customer service staff faces.

There are plenty of senior job boards, such as JobsOver50 or Senior Job Bank, where you can list openings to attract this age group; you can also contact local organizations for seniors in your community. 




 
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