Posts Tagged ‘Growth’


Is Your Passion Enough to Start a Business?

1-21 passion into business smallPassion is an overused term in business. You keep hearing “do what you love,” but you need to be thinking about whether your passion is truly sufficient enough to start a successful business. To create a business you must provide a product or service people are willing to pay for. Maybe you love knitting baby booties, and want to make millions doing so. I’m sad to tell you: unless you employ about 10,000 other baby-bootie knitters, you will likely never reach that financial goal.

It’s important that you assess whether your passion has a profit center before you start that business. By making sure you can actually make money you’ll ensure that your business will be able to weather an economic crisis and other bumps in the road. You also need to be able to scale that profit center beyond what your own two hands can create.

Assess Your Passions

Start by looking at what you’re passionate about. Your list will likely include things you can quickly mark off your “possible business” list, like “watching WWE fights or The Food Network.” You simply aren’t going to be able to build a business around that!

Maybe you’re an avid bike rider who’s passionate about taking kids on long cross-country bike treks. Or you love animals and have a knack for training them. Maybe you are good at helping friend pull together a killer look or update their wardrobe. These are passions you can build a business around.

But go beyond those obvious passions, like what you enjoy doing in your spare time, and look at the abstract. You might enjoy working with small teams, or planning events. You might love closing a sale, or have an eye for home design. Some of these passions may be worth considering starting a business around, while others may simply be useful as you develop your business.

Consider Your Goals

Going back to that baby bootie example. If you’re content knitting 25 hours a week and making enough cash to take a vacation, leaving you ample time to spend with your kids, this could be a sustainable business model. You have to look at your resources (at this point, that’s just you, the knitter) and determine whether you can accomplish what you want with them.

Maybe you’ve got money squirreled away, and could hire your knitting club to triple your production of booties. Now you’re talking! You could create a virtual network of knitters (say that 5 times fast) and grow your business from there.

Passion is a great place to start in becoming your own boss, but it’s not the only factor to consider. You also need to be able to make enough money to hit your goal, while maintaining the type of lifestyle you desire. Profit is how we keep score in business, so just make sure you are honest with yourself about whether or not your business concept can actual make money.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Are You Ignoring Your Returning Customers?

1-20-15 customer rewards smallHave you ever had this experience: You see an ad or offer for some amazing deal for a company of which you’re a longtime customer—something big, like “50% off a year’s membership.” Wow, you want to take advantage of that! But you can’t because there’s only one catch: The offer is for new customers only. “Hmph,” you think. “What am I, chopped liver?”

Many small businesses make the mistake of ignoring their biggest source of income: recurring customers. OK, maybe not “ignoring” them completely, but giving them the short end of the stick when it comes to attention, special offers and prime treatment.

It’s natural that getting new customers should be a key part of your business strategy. After all, every company needs new business in the pipeline to survive and grow. But the bulk of your time and attention should go to your existing customers. Why? Here are just a few reasons:

  • They’re already loyal customers.
  • It costs less to keep them satisfied (and buying) than it does to replace them.
  • Keep them happy and they’ll tell friends about your business.

What can you do to provide better treatment for your returning customers? Here are some ideas:

  • Hold special sales or events just for loyal customers.
  • Offer them early access to new merchandise or services.
  • Give them the chance to lock in current prices for the coming year or when they renew.
  • Use automation tools such as a CRM system to track details about your customers so you can personalize your customer service, offers and interactions. You can even greet them appropriately when they call your business!
  • Use technology that creates a record of customer service interactions so that when recurring customers contact you with problems, you can quickly access their histories.
  • Investigate loyalty programs for small businesses. There are many affordable options that integrate with your marketing, enabling more targeted outreach to returning customers.

It’s OK to create special offers and deals for new customers only—just be sure you provide equivalent or better rewards for customers who have shown their loyalty to your business. 


7 Things Successful People Never Ever Do

happiness & freedomIn a business person’s day, there is always more tasks than hours. The key to being successful is not to do more multitasking in an effort to cram more into each day. It’s not to work harder with longer hours to get everything done. What separates very successful people from the rest of the pack is not what they do, but actually what they never ever do. For example:

  1. Never hold on to the past. Successful people don’t let the future get shaped by what happened in the past. They don’t hold a grudge. They evaluate results of their success or failure, let go of it and move on within 24 hours of any event. Successful people realize that there is more opportunity in the future than the past.
  2. Never make big decisions. They never bet the company all on one action. They prevent this by making small incremental choices. Successful people test every result and then make another small decision to get to where the business needs to go.
  3. Never focus on perfection. It costs too much to achieve and there is that constant nagging feeling of failure. They would rather be done than have the job be perfect so they can learn from the results. This doesn’t mean successful people ever do a bad job, but rather, they do 100% and then move on to the next opportunity.
  4. Never do it all themselves. Successful people know that small business is truly a team sport. They know how to leverage each opportunity using other people and outside resources to accomplish their goal. Successful people realize that this is the key to building a company that is not just about them.
  5. Never say yes to every customer request. They know what their company is good at and carefully choose the problems they solve for their customers that will show the most value. As a result, they are able to honor existing commitments. In addition, successful people do not work with every interested customer and fire the ones that don’t match their culture.
  6. Never multi-task. Successful people know that multitasking only gets more things done poorly. They focus on the tactic at hand and then move on to the next one. They know how to block out common distractions like email and social media notifications.  Successful people can intensely focus for short periods of time.
  7. Never hang out with “Negative Nellies”. Successful people don’t keep company with other folks that are constantly telling them why something can’t get done. They don’t feed the neurosis of complainers who always want to say that the sky is always failing. Instead, successful people work with a team that has a can-do attitude where anything is possible.

As a successful person, what do you never ever do?


Mondays with Mike: What You Can Learn From Hyper-Startups

1-12 business plan smallThere are time-tested procedures for starting a business – from writing elaborate business plans to generating sales projections.  While we can learn a lot from following traditional paths, there’s a host of new entrepreneurs who start their businesses in a flash – moving from idea to implementation in a matter of hours.  These hyper-startups are volatile, flexible, and sometimes unstable, but there’s a lot we can learn from them.

  1. Reach out to customers right away.  While traditional models would have you create a prototype and run alpha and beta testing with a sample of potential customers, hyper-startups rope their customers in right away.  Using crowdfunding and crowdsourcing sites, entrepreneurs can solicit startup funds, feedback, and suggestions from end users before a product is even produced.  Bonus – when you do have a product to take to market, you’ve already established a list of potential buyers.  You’re researching and marketing all at the same time!
  2. Let your best customer find you.  Now, I’m not suggesting that you won’t need to do any marketing in order to reach customers, but what is worth pointing out is that by assuming you already know who your customer is, you may be missing out on your best customer.  Keep an open mind in terms of who will be excited about your product, and even about new or unexpected uses for your product or service.  Hyper-startups know to listen to the chatter.  Don’t limit yourself by thinking you know it all.
  3. Be mobile and be ready.  As more and more business is done on iPads, smartphones, and tablets, the speed with which a savvy entrepreneur can move from idea to income has become mindboggling.  Being ready and able to work wherever and whenever inspiration strikes makes you more effective and more efficient.  Integrating social media with your startup right away lets you make changes and share news anytime, anywhere.
  4. Ride the wave – and know when to throw in the towel.  Hyper-startups can flourish in a flash and fail just as rapidly.  Keeping abreast of trends and market shifts is essential if you’re going to make hay while the sun shines.  Not only does staying up on what’s hot keep you profitable, but it can also permit you to shape trends, in addition to reacting to them.  Encourage your customers to stay connected and keep in touch about their experiences and needs.  Not only are your vocal customers key in keeping your offerings current, but they’re also your best marketers, bringing in new fans every day.
  5. Plan for success (and prepare for failure.)  So you’ve got a brilliant idea.  Are you prepared for what you’ll do if it’s a crazy success and you have more business than you can handle?  Make sure you have a plan for how to scale up production and delivery just in case you’re a big hit.  Also, have an exit strategy, a stop-loss point at which you’ll cut your losses and move on if the startup doesn’t flourish.

Hyper-startups are inherently volatile.  They depend on the changeable desires and interests of notoriously fickle consumers who seek out the new and noteworthy.  That doesn’t mean hyper-startups are all bad.  It’s possible to make a lot of money in a very short period of time, provided you’re prepared.  Even if you choose a more traditional route to starting your company, there are elements of these rapid developers you can use to make your efforts more effective, even long-term.


Breaking Bad Business Habits

1-9 breaking bad habits smallSmall business owners are among the hardest-working people in the country. They get in early and stay late, handle every business detail and bend over backwards to meet and exceed the needs of their clients and customers. On the surface, these traits are admirable. But they can also stifle the future of your company. Here are five habits to kill so that you can work smarter, instead of harder, and maximize your success.

Working Non-stop

When you turn your computer off at the end of each day, it re-starts completely fresh in the morning.  When you don’t, it starts to work sluggishly and sometimes, it even crashes.  Don’t you think that your mind needs the same break? A little R&R (and a good night’s sleep) gives your brain a chance to process the previous day’s events. And, since it’s not uncommon to go to sleep with an unsolved problem and wake up with the solution, you can sleep guilt-free, knowing that you may continue to work after you hit the sack.  Even just taking some time to exercise, watch television or engage in a hobby allows you to be your best self and in turn, that makes you better in your business.

Short-term Thinking

With cash-flow a common issue for small business owners, it’s tempting to chase every dollar. Granted, you’ll get a quick hundred bucks now if you take on a two-day special project for a client. But, those two days might be better spent going on sales calls to acquire new business or starting a large project that will realize major income, even if you won’t see it until next month.  Or perhaps you have a temporary solution to a business issue that doesn’t take into account future issues that the new solution might cause to your customers.  Don’t just think about today; be focused on your ultimate goals.

Doing Everything Yourself

Most entrepreneurs wear all hats in the early days of their businesses, but during times of growth, they have to learn to let go of the daily minutiae. At some point, you need to outsource or delegate, even if you don’t think others can handle every task as brilliantly as you do it. You definitely should continue to monitor the progress of all business operations, but let your employees, contractors and/or service providers do things in the ways that they are comfortable while you focus on the aspects of your business where you can add the most value and be best utilized.

Addressing the “Urgent” Rather than the “Important”

The squeaky wheel may get the grease, but a wheel might make no noise before falling off of the car. So, even though Customer A is yelling the loudest — or yelled most recently — Customer B (or even a new customer that you are courting) may have more important issues.

Your job is to correctly prioritize every task and stick to your decisions. If newer issues are more important than others on your to-do list, place them higher on the list. This simple method allows the most trivial issues to naturally fall to the bottom of the list (which, by the way, might help identify great tasks to delegate).

Being a “Yes Man” (or Woman)

Every business owner needs to learn how to say “no.” You can only take on so many projects at once. You can lose your reputation and clients if you have to cut so many corners that you turn out less-than-stellar products or services. Before taking on new work, remind yourself of your end goals as a business and use those goals as your litmus test. If you’re already short on time and responding to a request does not further those goals, you need to turn it down.

Let your business habits match your business cycle. The habits that served you in the early days of your business do not necessarily make sense as your company becomes more mature. Don’t be constrained by the “I’ve always done it this way” attitude. Take a little time to determine the best ways to use your time and resources to take care of your business and yourself. 


How to Do Multitasking Right

1-8 multi-tasking smallIn most cases, multitasking only accomplishes one thing: it gets more things done poorly. However, there is a way to do multitasking that can increase productivity.

When running a small business, everyone and everything demands your attention all at once. With so much to do against so many distractions, it’s amazing that anything gets accomplished well. The answer can be multitasking, but it’s important to clarify what multitasking should be and just what can never ever happen.

If you are constantly shifting back and forth between tasks or allowing interruptions to determine what gets done, you are doing multitasking wrong. This type of activity has been reported to cause as much as a 40% reduction in productivity. Not surprisingly, it also increases the incidents of mistakes and errors.

While people shouldn’t perform several tasks at once, they can manage several tasks at one time. Multitasking should be thought of as a system for being able to make quick decisions about the importance and sequence of tasks, and then proceeding to complete those focused tasks efficiently.

Here are steps for doing multitasking right:

  1. Prioritize. Make a short list of the things to be accomplished (five or less) and which needs to be accomplished first.
  2. Organize. Once tasks are prioritized, decide which tasks on the list can actually be done together. This is efficient and saves more time than starting and stopping different activities. For example, instead of calling four prospects at random times throughout the day, set aside two hours to make the four 30 minute phone calls back-to-back. Also, checking email only two to four times a day is more productive then looking at each notification.
  3. Focus. Complete the task at hand and don’t think of all the other things that need to get done. Block out all other interruptions. Everything should be on the prioritized to-do list and out of mind until the more important tasks are complete. 
  4. Finish what you start. Going back and forth between tasks wastes time because it ends up being more difficult to complete the task when you try to go back to it. Aim to finish the task, in one or two work sessions, before moving on to another one.
  5. Delegate. There is a certain point where not even operating at 100 percent efficiency can get everything done. It’s important to recognize as soon as you can’t do everything yourself. The best course of action is to delegate your tasks to employees and other outside resources.

This is what multitasking should look like. The sooner you stop doing multiple things at once and start managing multiple things at once, the better off your businesses will be and the more you will actually get done. 


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 5 Customer Service Resolutions for 2015

1-6 CS resolutions smallIncreasingly, customer service is the standard by which companies are measured, and the service you provide can make or break your small business. To achieve better customer service and more sales in 2015, here are five customer service resolutions for your small business.

  1. I will listen to my customers. You can read everything written about new technology trends, customer service on social media and more, but the reality comes down to one thing: What do your customers want? Don’t make customer service changes based on Top 10 or Hot Trends lists—make them based on what your customers are asking for. Listen to customers in every possible channel, from social media and online reviews to in-person conversations, surveys and emails. They’re giving you feedback every minute of the day if you’ll only open your ears.
  2. I will listen to my customer service employees. Equally important as listening to your customers is listening to your customer service reps and any other frontline employee who engages with customers. They’re the ones who use your tools and systems every day, hear customer complaints and praise, and know when a process is unwieldy, wasting time or annoying customers. Don’t assume they’re just griping—take their complaints seriously and regularly ask them for input on how your customer service could be improved.
  3. I will invest in customer service. Customer service is paramount today, so don’t skimp when it comes to spending on the technology, tools and training your employees need to provide standout service. Carefully weigh the costs of various options and assess how much they could potentially save you. If an investment enables you to spend less time on training, less money on employee salaries or less time getting new employees up to speed, chances are it’s worth the cost. 
  4. I will offer options. Some customers love to talk on the phone to live customer service agents. Others hate dealing with humans and prefer filling out online forms. Still others opt for the speedy resolution of online chat while they multitask on their computers. No one customer service option is right or wrong, and to reach the widest range of customers, you need to offer all the options that your customers express interest in and use.  
  5. I will always remember customers are human beings. This is the most important resolution of all. As customer interactions become increasingly enabled by technology, it’s easy to forget there’s a person at the other end of the online review/chat box/phone line. When you or your team are struggling with difficult customers, stop, take a breath and remember to engage with them on a human level. That means listening to them vent, acknowledging their frustrations and offering a solution that makes them happy.

What are your customer service resolutions for 2015? 


10 Trends for Small Business In 2015

1-2 2015 trends small

This New Year will be an important one for every small business as powerful trends shape the direction of the economy. Here are the shifts that companies can expect in 2015:

  1. Less employees, more freelancers. The nature of work has profoundly changed. Small businesses now are easily able to match new revenue to needs in increased resources. This means less permanent employees and more part time resources. This is a beneficial trend that enables the small business owner to make their workforce a variable expense as their sales goes up and down.
  2. Less office employees, more remote resources. While it can be comforting for small business owners to look out from their office and see their team, this version of the company is a thing of the past. Instead, all managers need to get comfortable with leading and building a team culture with remote resources that they do not see every day.
  3. Less email, more in person meetings (or at least video chat). People have opted for email instead of phone calls. But the trend this year will be to have more in person meetings with employees, vendors and customers as everyone wants to make true connections that build lasting relationships.
  4. Less apps, more dashboards. Apple and Android apps have become ubiquitous. According to a recent Intermedia study, 14.3 is the average number of apps per small business and it’s hurting employee productivity. Companies will begin to use more dashboards to integrate these apps to track the key metrics of their business. These include tools like iDashboard.
  5. Less “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD), more company issued phones. In recent years, small businesses have saved money by having employees conveniently use their own smart phone device for business. This has resulted in many security issues. The trend is for companies to spend the extra money to issue business only devices. They are then able to load only approved applications and keep tight security on those smartphones.
  6. Less data, more analysis. Small business owners are flooded with disparate data that they don’t understand. The trend is away from just data to more analysis of what it all means. Key tools include Power BI from Microsoft, Qlik and Tableau. These applications can integrate much of the company information into something that can be used by management.
  7. Less features, more relationships. With the spread of information almost instantaneously worldwide, there are less differences in product features. The customer can always choose the lowest price. The focus in 2015 will be to continue to service the customer to build value in a personal long term relationship that ensures loyalty. This includes less mass marketing and more one on one personalization through technology.
  8. Less secrecy, more transparency. With social media instantly communicating anything and with every phone having a camera, nothing in business is a secret any longer. This will force every small business to be much more transparent in dealings with customers, employees and product developments. This will also boost more social responsibility for these companies.
  9. Less organic social posts, more boosted advertising. With the sheer glut of millions of posts every day clogging feeds, small business owners in 2015 will be forced to boost their message through social media paid advertising on all the major platforms in order to be seen by their customers.
  10. Less bank loans, more peer to peer lending. Even though bank loans will continue to grow from the depths of the Great Recession, small businesses will now get more of their capital from sites like Fundera that will help choose the best alternate source.

What trends do you see in your business for 2015?


How to Choose a Structure for Your Small Business

12-31 Business Structure smallWhen starting a business, a lot of newbie entrepreneurs overlook what is one of the most key components to their business:  selecting an appropriate business structure. By default, your business will operate as a sole proprietorship, but you won’t get any legal protection should your business be sued. You need to consider forming an LLC or corporation as your setup your business. If you’re serious about being in business for years to come, it’s a wise idea to form a legal entity. Do you homework and consult with professional about the “right” legal structure for your business. Here’s what you need to know about how to choose the best business structure for your small business.

Benefits to Incorporating

First, consider making your business a corporation. Corporations — especially the S-Corp, is a popular option for small businesses — provide ample benefits that a sole proprietorship does not.

With a corporation, your personal assets are protected. Once your business is incorporated, it exists as a separate legal entity from you. In the event that you are sued or file bankruptcy, the corporation — not you, the owner — is responsible for all of its debts and liabilities. So your personal assets, like your home or savings, can’t be touched to pay your business debt. They can, on the other hand, be used to cover your business debt if you are a sole proprietor.

Incorporating also has tax perks. Through an S-Corp, you can use what’s called pass-through taxation. That’s a fancy way of saying that an S-Corp is taxed more like a sole proprietor or a partnership than as a separate entity, the way a C Corporation is. So company profits are “passed through” and reported on your personal income tax return. You get taxed only once on your revenue. End of story.

Benefits to Forming an LLC

An LLC has many of the same tax and personal asset protection benefits as a corporation. In fact, when it comes to taxes, there’s a lot more flexibility in how you file, as you can file as a:

  • Corporations
  • Dual Member: Partnership
  • Single Member

An additional perk is that LLCs require a little less red tape and annual paperwork to file, than an S-Corp.

Which to Choose?

Ultimately, the decision on which business structure to set up for your small business will come down to preferences. Speak to a lawyer or tax professional about the benefits of each for your specific benefits. The goal, no matter which you select, is to make sure your business and personal assets are protected, and that you have the best setup for taxes (after all, who wants to pay more than they have to?).

Keep in mind you may need to file paperwork or pay fees to remain compliant with either structure. Do all the research necessary to determine exactly how much work you’ll need to put into maintaining your business structure status, or look to companies who can manage the maintenance on your behalf.




 
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