Posts Tagged ‘Entrepreneur’


What Color Should Your Logo Be?

Small business owners fret over what their logo looks like. They want it to be clean, cool or fancy. What they should really focus on is how it makes a customer feel since logos play a large role in their purchasing decisions. Researchers at the University of Amsterdam found that children as young as two years old could recall a logo and its product 67% of the time. By eight, 100 percent of children tested could associate the logo with the product.

???????????????????????????Brand logos are valuable property because they evoke emotions connected with buying. For the first time in the history of Interbrand’s Best Global Brands report, Apple was the top brand. Google jumped to number 2 and Coca-Cola, the brand that held the number one position for 13 years was number three. The total value of all 100 Best Global Brands was $1.5 trillion with the Google brand logo being worth over $100 billion alone.

According to a new research at Financesonline.com, colors evoke a specific emotional response from a customer. This is important since 75% of all buying decision are emotional.

Here are what specific colors mean:

Red means active, passionate, trustful, love, and intensity. Think Coca-Cola and Target. Red Bull wants customers to see their brand as intense and active.

Yellow means energy and joy. Think Ferrari, Shell and Best Buy. McDonalds wants customers to associate their brand with happiness.

Orange means creative, determined, joyful and the beach. It can stimulate mental activity. Think Fanta and Firefox. The Home Depot wants to help its customers be creative in the Do-It-Yourself market of home construction and repair.

Pink is often associated with feminine brands. It means love, warm, sexuality and nurturing. Think Barbie and T-Mobile. Oprah’s Oxygen network is aimed at women.

Blue means depth, stability, calm, trust, comfort, and reliability. Think Samsung, IBM, Intel, GE and Ford. When a customer buys from Nextiva, they know that their office communications will always be reliably delivered.

Green means relax, peaceful, hopeful and natural. Think Starbucks and BP. Heineken beer wants their customers to feel exactly this way.

Brown is associated with the Earth. It means reliability, support, dependability and grounded. Think Godiva Chocolate and M&Ms (at least the brown ones). UPS has become synonymous with this type of consistent reliability.

Black means formal, mystery, bold, luxurious and serious. Think Blackberry. Customers shop at Tiffany’s for that special occasion.

A logo should not just be “pretty or cool”. Determine what feeling do you want your brand to evoke? Choose your colors wisely.

Barry Moltz helps get small businesses unstuck. His new book, “How to Get Unstuck: 25 Ways to Get Your Business Growing Again” is now available. 


Are You Keeping Score?

Stocksy_txp79d51f4dtW4000_Small_126195Some business people want to prevent losing by not keeping score, by ignoring the results, or by constantly moving the targets.

When my sons were introduced to baseball as small boys, the league prohibited officials from keeping score because they did not want the children to become too competitive at such an early age. League leaders wanted to emphasize the spirit of playing the game and having fun over winning or losing.

This did not work out the way the league planned. All the children on the team who knew how to count were keeping their own score. They knew who was winning! More importantly, they understood that a key part of the game is knowing how to win and to lose.

In winning, you can celebrate with your team members. You are elated because your hard work achieved the goal. In losing, you console yourself along with the team. The next steps are to learn what to do better, shake it off, and vow to return the next time to try again.

It’s important to know the score and declare winners and losers. A recent Ohio High School Hockey championship game was halted after seven overtimes and a 1-1 tie. State officials declared co-champions which angered a lot of players and fans. There was no postgame trophy ceremony because there was only one set of championship hardware. The players took turns posing for pictures with the lone trophy. In ended in a totally unsatisfying experience for both teams.

Many small business owners move their stated targets and goals so they don’t have to admit defeat. This happens during the budgeting process. The company will set a financial goal for the year, but when they start to miss this target, they change the budget. They hate to be wrong so they move the goal to a place they can make it. Similar, objectives are established for employee bonus pay, but when the target is missed, some companies award them anyways because of effort.

Both these examples defeat the purpose of setting a budget or establishing a bonus. Business people learn quickly that winning is a lot more fun and profitable. Learning what it feels like to lose is critical because that will incent everyone involved not to repeat it.

If your company never loses, how can they really appreciate winning?


Work Your Biz Wednesday: 4 Ways to Kickstart Your Marketing Efforts

Marketing your small business doesn't have to be difficult! Here are 4 ways to jump start your marketing plan and boost your revenue from the Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


The Small Business Advantage to Snagging the Best Employees

One of my contacts worked for a young, growing company that paid top dollar for software engineers in preparation for the day that they would be needed to meet client demand.  When she expressed concern about the overspending, one partner told her that if she was in charge, the company would be defunct in a year.  Six months later, their doors closed forever.

That partner was not wrong in recognizing the need for exceptionally-skilled workers.  The error was in seeing spending as the only way to attract and keep the best talent.  Large corporations may have ready cash to pay top wages and benefits, but small business owners can attract and keep the finest employees through their entrepreneurial spirit.  Here are some great ways to get your workers involved in your business vision and develop a relationship that few big businesses can match.

Offer Creative Compensation

Economic downturns may create a buyer’s market for hiring, but that doesn’t mean that the most skilled applicants will agree to take a position that offers substandard incentives.  You may not have the funds to pay a top salary when making an offer — or even when it’s time for an annual review.  But as a small business, your company can offer achievement-based bonuses that can really motivate your employees while increasing your revenues.  So, when certain sales reps are responsible for accelerated sales or when engineers enhance a product to make it more attractive to the marketplace, make sure that they receive their fair share of the profits.

Encourage Active Involvement in the Company

Choosing to work for a small company carries certain inherent risks, but it also offers benefits that cannot be matched by working for a huge organization.  When you welcome and act on employee ideas and suggestions, your employees become partners who recognize their unique value to the company as they work alongside you to realize shared goals.

Make sure to listen to their feedback and acknowledge them too- the value of these soft incentives is highly underrated—not to mention easy for small business owners to embrace.

Give Employees the Power to Spread Their Wings

I know a writer who worked for many small software businesses, enlisting her full creativity to develop low-cost, but award-winning manuals.  When she moved to a large company, she vehemently complained that she no longer wrote documentation, so much as manufactured it in accordance with strict, detailed procedures.  She didn’t last long in this position.

Big businesses need to put their employees in specific boxes and keep them there to get their allotted portion of the job done.  As a business owner, you know that one of the greatest rewards comes with seeing a project through from beginning to final results.  Employees can feel that same sense of satisfaction and accomplishment — if you empower them to take on this type of challenge.  As they stretch their abilities, be available to provide upfront and ongoing guidance as needed, but give them latitude to do it their way.  As their abilities grow from new experiences, their investment in the company’s interests will grow as well.

Praise in Public

??????????????????????????????????????A job well done deserves praise and your employees never mind being called to your office to receive your personal kudos.  But when employees receive your commendations at a company meeting or in front of a customer who benefitted from their hard work, they clearly see their true value.  Naturally, public praise helps inspire all employees, but it also lets your customers recognize how the depth of your products and services helps them get the attention and consideration they deserve.

Promote from Within

When a key position opens up in your company, always look first to the members of the team that work hard for you every day.  Granted, some positions require very specific educational requirements not available in your organization, such as a degree in accounting.  But remember that your staff members already have a solid foundation and a deeper understanding of your company culture and how things work.  You probably have to spend time and effort training employees in new concepts and procedures.  Or, they may need to take a class or two to obtain additional knowledge.  But you can’t teach loyalty and dedication, and these traits grow even more when you reward them with advancement.

No large company can match the excitement employees experience going in to a job where they know that they make a vital difference every day.  As their efforts help grow your business, make sure you help them continue to grow as well.  


Where Small Businesses Are Stuck in 2014

During the course of their career, every small business owner gets stuck. The key is to know where and how to get unstuck.

My annual survey of 5,000 small business owners identifies the problem areas. Here are a few excerpts:

  1. Treating their company like a job. The Survey: Over 40% of owners do whatever customers need in order to earn money for their business. This does not allow them to strategically ramp up a profitable business. The Solution: Don’t take every piece of work offered by a customer. Focus on what the company is good at and get more of that profitable business.
  2. The daily plan gets interrupted when entering the office. The Survey: 53% don’t have a plan for their day or it gets destroyed when the start work. The Solution: Before opening email, voice mail or social media, do two important tasks that will make the day productive.
  3. Stocksy_txpe7f75a0ezH4000_Small_41935They never take a break. The Survey: Over 50% said they are too busy to take a break and always have their phone near them. This is because they have a fear of getting left behind. The Solution: Find a daily place without a smartphone where personal batteries can be recharged and let creativity flow.
  4. They fear failure. The Survey: Over 40% said that failure is not an option. They fear it so much that they stop taking risks in their business. The Solution: Accept failure. Learn something. Let go of that failure and take another action to get to another success.
  5. They are afraid of selling. The Survey: 41% are either afraid of rejection or not sure how to build a relationship with a prospect. 59% said that they are too busy servicing existing customer to find new ones. The Solution: A company can’t really sell anything to anyone. They need to be there when customers are ready to buy by executing a daily systematic marketing plan.
  6. They stop marketing as soon as they have sales. The Survey: 58% only market their products when they do not have sales. They also believe their products are so superior that they do not need to market them at all! The Solution: Execute a systematic marketing plan through content marketing on a weekly basis.
  7. They don’t know how to use or have stopped with social media. The Survey: 54% either do not have a social media strategy or have stopped using it. The Solution: Social media is part of promotion. Use it to form relationships by providing help to customers, prospects and connectors.
  8. They let poor performing employees stay. The Survey: 53% never fire employees since it is too uncomfortable or they are too loyal. The Solution: Be slow to hire and quick to fire. Find the team that makes the company profitable. Fire anyone that does not add productively to the company.
  9. They don’t ask for help. The Survey: 44% never ask for help because they believe they have to figure it out on their own. Many others are unsure of who to ask for help. The Solution: Find a formal or informal group of advisors and mentors to answer pressing questions. Do not go it alone!
  10. They allow personal smartphone usage at work. The Survey: 74% do not monitor personal use of smartphones which can destroy company productivity. The Solution: Have a written policy that personal smartphones are not to be used during work except in emergencies.

Bonus: They rarely review their financial statements. The Survey: Over 20% never look at their financial statements because they are hard to understand. The Solution: Get trained to understand every line of the company’s financial statement. Review them monthly.

Tell me where you are stuck!


Mondays with Mike: Fast Flow Prospecting

Stocksy_txpaa3f874fBY3000_Small_164426The business world moves too fast for any of us to rest on our laurels.  While Monday might be great, smart entrepreneurs worry about Tuesday, knowing that ensuring a steady stream of new clients is essential for a healthy business.  It’s a struggle we all face – finding high quality prospects to convert and keep our companies growing. 

Client referrals have always been a traditional source for new prospects, but there are some problems with getting good quality referrals.  If we assume that you’re providing outstanding service to your existing customers, they’ll have two primary concerns about sharing your services with their competitors.  First, they’ll want you to continue to be available to serve their needs.  They don’t want your success to get in the way of their demands.  Second, if you’re providing a service that gives them a competitive edge – whether it’s personal or professional – they’ll be reluctant to share their brilliant discovery – you – with their competition.  They may want to keep you all to themselves.

The gold ring is the organic referral – when a friend of your client is desperate for a plumber, asks for a recommendation, and the client shares your name.  An associate asks who designed your client’s logo, and they give you a rave review and pass on your contact info.  The problem is that these high quality referrals are few and far between, and they’re also – by their vary nature – inconsistent.

So what do you do?  You require new clients, but cold-calling is expensive and yields poor-quality results.

The answer is fast flow prospecting, and here’s how it works:  You approach your clients and ask them for a referral to their other vendors.  They may look at you like you’re crazy.  The angle, though, is that you’re going to reach out to their other vendors and work with them to provide even better service for your mutual clients.  Whether you can consolidate shipments to save your clients money, or whether you can bundle services and offer predictable monthly payments, working with other vendors can help you create efficiencies and provide better service at a reduced cost for the client who referred you.

Here’s the key, though – once you’ve established a relationship with your vendor partners, then you ask for referrals to their other clients.  You’ll be presented with a pool of new clients – clients to whom you’ll be recommended by your partners, and clients for whom you can provide outstanding, streamlined and efficient service.  You’re expanding your network via new partnerships.

So let’s say that you’re a small, independent internet access provider.  You get some vendor referrals from your satisfied clients and you connect with a company that installs and monitors security systems.  The two of you offer bundled services to your existing shared clients, providing them with better, more affordable internet services that improve the reliability of the security system.  Win-win.

The security company shares its client list with you, and you can now pitch your combined services to a whole new group of prospective customers – customers who can get reliable references from the provider of their security services.

Working together with your clients and their other vendors gives you a much wider field of clients, and provides ample opportunity to improve efficiency and profitability for everyone.

 


Transitioning from Networking to Relationships

One of the biggest assets for any business isn’t on its balance sheet—it’s the entrepreneur’s network.  Networks become a valuable source of customer, service provider and even employee referrals and leads. 

However, many people go straight from a networking event to expecting favors or other immediate results.  Like good friendships, network relationships require care and attention.  And like a fine wine, they take time to become robust.

After you network, use the following five recommendations to help you to build solid, mutually-beneficial and long-term network connections.

Take Notes Immediately

The back of a business card provides a blank slate where you can take the notes that you need to begin developing a personal relationship.  When you first meet new contacts, they can reveal quite a bit about whom they are, what they need and how they can help you.  As you jot down key points, make note of any ideas that you have for information that you can share to demonstrate your value to them.  Keep track of this information to help you to know the best way to connect in the future.

Make First Contact Quickly

You do not have a relationship simply because you walk away with a handful of business cards.  Networkers can forget each other’s names in just a few days, so your first meaningful contact happens when you pick up the phone or send an email.

Within a few days of your initial meetings, reach out to remind your new acquaintance who you are and why you are excited about the new relationship.  This is not the time to start asking for favors, but it might be a great time to share a bit more about each other and confirm how your association can be mutually beneficial.

Feed Your Network

I love it when one of my contacts sends me a link to information about our common business interests or even hobbies.  I don’t even mind some good natured trash-talking about the performance (or lack thereof) of my favorite sports team.  Sending valuable and relevant information is a great way to show your commitment to building a good two-way relationship.    

Of course, you need to strike a balance between maintaining regular contact and subjecting someone to information overload—I fondly refer to this as the fine line between being “persistent” and “annoying”.  Only send information that applies specifically to your contact’s interests and concerns.  Articles you send that solve their unique problems are like gold.  Generic information or off-color jokes are like spam.  If you can proactively offer valuable assistance to your contacts, they will want to do the same for you.

Don’t be Afraid to Ask for Help

A good network provides mutual assistance in times of need and feeling free to ask for help is an important part of the relationship.  Personally, I see these requests as recognition of my accomplishments and expertise and I welcome the opportunity to help when I can, if it’s a small, clear and easy ask.  So don’t be shy when you need to ask for help.  Just make sure that you express how much you respect their skills and experience — and remind them of ways that you can help them in the future.

If the request is a significant one, also offer to pay them for their time to show that you value it and them. 

Say Thank You — and Mean it

Whether your contacts generously share information or step in to resolve a specific issue, show your gratitude in a personal way.  While a thank-you email might be nice, you can probably do something more meaningful.  At one end of the spectrum, writing a personal recommendation on LinkedIn or even tweeting or re-tweeting a compliment that brings them more business might be some valuable ways to say thanks.  But when someone brings you a lucrative new business contract or enhances your business in any significant way, an invitation out to lunch or even a gift can be an appropriate display of gratitude.

Making quality connections can be the difference between minor and major business success, so follow the steps above and lather-rinse-repeat as necessary.

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Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Should You Hire Your Spouse to Work in Your Business?

Stocksy_txpb6090cd68s3000_Small_17056If you have trouble finding workers with the dedication and loyalty you need, there’s a solution that can offer the best of both worlds: hiring your spouse. You get an employee who you know truly cares about your business, and the money you pay your spouse stays “all in the family.”

But before you broach the idea to your spouse, there are some important factors to consider.

How will working together affect your relationship? Some spouses can work together all day long and enjoy a happy marriage after hours, while others find business stresses spilling over into their personal lives. Clearly define roles within the business so each of you knows what he or she is responsible for. Also set boundaries outside the business, such as not discussing business over dinner or taking regular weekends off.

What does your spouse expect from the job? Perhaps your spouse expects to work closely together and spend lots of time with you, while you expect to scarcely see each other because you’ll both be so busy handling your separate duties. Clarify your expectations from the beginning and make sure you are both on the same page. Is this a short-term arrangement or a permanent move? Will your spouse need to work for free if money is tight?

How will a spouse working in the business affect your company’s dynamic? When you bring a family member into the business, nonfamily employees may assume your spouse will get favored treatment, that they will be passed over for promotions or that they can’t be honest with you about problems with your spouse. Discuss these issues openly to ease their worries.

What are the legal and tax implications? The way that you report and pay taxes for a spouse in the business will vary depending on whether your spouse is considered an employee or partner/co-owner. If the spouse is an employee, you need to withhold appropriate taxes from his or her pay just as with any employee. If your spouse has an equal say in the business and/or contributes capital, he or she is considered a partner, which affects your business’s tax reporting and payments. (See this IRS article for more information.) To avoid unpleasant surprises, consult your attorney and accountant regarding the tax and legal implications of bringing a spouse on board. 


Mondays with Mike: The Quick Qualifier – The Secret To Better, Faster Hiring

For entrepreneurs with a sizeable staff, payroll can be one of the biggest expenses.  That expense can multiply quickly if we don’t hire the right people, so any techniques we can find to improve our hiring outcomes can make a huge difference in our bottom lines.  The fact is that there aren’t a whole lot of shortcuts when it comes to running your business better, but I’m going to share one that can help you simultaneously speed up your hiring process while sifting out your best choices – automatically.

????????????????????????????????Conventional wisdom may tell you that casting as wide a net as possible in your hiring search will yield the highest quality result, but given today’s job market, your problem is unlikely to be a shortage of applications.  Rather, you’re likely to be buried under a sea of resumes, and your greatest challenge will be separating the wheat from the chaff – reducing the flood to a manageable stack of resumes from qualified, competent folks.  That’s where my technique comes into play.

When I post an ad for a job, about 75% of the way through the ad, I insert the following:  “To prove that you’re a meticulous reader, you have to include the following sentence when you send your resume: ‘It is with my utmost respect that I hereto surrender my curriculum vitae for your consideration.’”

Now here’s where the automation comes in.  You create an email filter that searches for the specified sentence, and sorts all of the qualifying resumes into a folder for you to review.  Think it won’t make a big difference?  Think again!  I’ve had as many as 80% of the resumes for a specific position eliminated by this filtering tactic.  Now you may be worried that you might discard a great resume, but let me tell you why this technique works:

  1. The unemployment rate is still so high that folks are desperate, sending off resumes to any ad they read, regardless of whether or not they’re qualified.  In fact, the applicants who don’t include the sentence may not have even read the application, and might have zero relevant experience.  They’re not the employees you’re looking for.
  2. Regardless of the field, attention to detail is crucial, and including the sentence demonstrates that an applicant cares enough to get it right.
  3. You’re looking for candidates who can follow instructions, and applicants who comply with your directions demonstrate a willingness to do what you expect them to.  They’re eager to please, and that’s important for nearly every position in a business.

I’ve used this technique repeatedly, and it’s proven to help select the very best candidates for my careful consideration.  In fact, one of the best employees I’ve ever hired responded by writing: “Yes, I’m so detail-oriented I am including the sentence you requested. However, I also noticed you spelled the word ‘meticulous’ incorrectly, and here’s the correct way to spell it.”  She ended up being a partner in one of my companies.




 
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