Posts Tagged ‘Entrepreneur’


20 Quotes to Inspire Entrepreneurs

As an entrepreneur, you are most likely a glass-half-full kind of person. Without a positive attitude, it is nearly impossible to maintain the edge that you need to keep moving forward. But, no one can be happy and confident at all times. Here are some thoughts from entrepreneurs, athletes and innovators, including one from me, that can help you look at issues with a different viewpoint — and fill your goblet to the rim.

Persistence, Success and Failure

“Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.” -Henry Ford

“Fail often so you can succeed sooner.” -Tom Kelley

“I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” -Michael Jordan

“Flaming enthusiasm, backed up by horse sense and persistence, is the quality that most frequently makes for success.” -Dale Carnegie

“Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” -Bill Gates

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take” -Wayne Gretzky

Ambition and Focus

“Ambition is a dream with a V8 engine.” -Elvis Presley

“Jet pilots don’t use rear view mirrors.” -Joel H. Weldon

“Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps, down new roads, armed with nothing but their own vision.” -Ayn Rand

“Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” -Vince Lombardi

“Entrepreneurs too often make choices based on ROE– Return on Ego– vs. ROI– Return on Investment.  A particular opportunity may make you feel great, but if that opportunity is not supporting your goal, or isn’t the best way to achieve your goal quickly and efficiently, then pursue the opportunity that will.” –Carol Roth

Leadership

“A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” -Arnold H. Glasgow

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” -John Quincy Adams

“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” -Peter Drucker

Competition and Motivation

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.” -Steve Jobs

“And while the law of competition may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it ensures the survival of the fittest in every department.” -Andrew Carnegie

“I gave it my body and mind, but I have kept my soul.” -Phil Jackson

“Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” -Theodore Roosevelt

Problem Solving

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” -Albert Einstein

“The most serious mistakes are not being made as a result of wrong answers. The truly dangerous thing is asking the wrong questions.” -Peter Drucker


Mondays with Mike: Win Customers With Your Authenticity

6-15 Be Authentic smallEven though I’m not an accountant, I understand just how important effective accounting and accountants are to running my business successfully.  A few years ago, I attended an accounting conference, and I’ll admit it:  I wasn’t very excited about it.  I hire accountants because that’s not where my natural talents lie.

But there I was, armed with a gallon of high-octane coffee, committed to sitting through what I predicted would be a boring presentation.  The featured speaker stepped up to the podium, and I nearly groaned out loud.  He was everything I was afraid he’d be:  boring suit and matching monotone voice, with a heaping helping of a snooze-worthy Powerpoint.  Making numbers interesting ain’t easy, and this guy didn’t even try.

I made it through the presentation without falling asleep and drooling on my neighbor, and I hightailed it out of the seminar, glad to be gone.  You can imagine my dismay when I attended a friend’s barbecue a few weeks later and literally bumped into the accountant speaker.  Since we were face-to-face (and because he recognized me,) I was stuck.  While I was thinking of excuses to escape, he surprised me, though.

He was actually funny.  He was relaxed, dressed casually, and he was really interesting.  It was like it had been his boring clone making the presentations, because this guy was nothing like he’d been the first time we’d met.  We were laughing about a joke he’d told when he said something that simply stunned me.  He said, “Man, I hate having to be all professional at work.  I wish I could make money just by being myself.”

I’m pretty sure I spaced out for a moment as I though about the weight of what he’d just said.  He had no idea that he was more compelling, more appealing, and even seemed more trustworthy when he was being himself.  By putting on a false front in an attempt to appear professional, the accountant was making himself fit a mold that not only wasn’t comfortable for him, but was also unappealing to his clients.

I left that barbecue with two important takeaways.  First of all, that guy is now my accountant – the very best I’ve ever had.  Secondly, I realized just how important it is to be brave enough to be our authentic selves.  In fact, it’s when we give ourselves permission to let our real personalities emerge that we’re most likely to find clients who really connect with us, our values, and our big-picture goals.

Now I’m not advising that folks stop showering or litter their sales pitches with dirty jokes, but what I am advising is that we stop trying to pretend to be someone we’re not.  Let your creativity peek out.  Give your quirky sense of humor a chance to brighten your sales presentations.  Will everyone get your off-the-wall jokes?  Probably not.  But the ones who do are more likely to end up as customers for life.

I’m reminded of the wise Dr. Seuss’ timeless advice:  “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.”  Let your authentic self shine through, and you’ll find your best, most loyal customers.


Three Ways that Viral Fads can Create Successful Businesses

Posted on by Carol Roth

6-8 instant success smallEvery entrepreneur dreams of “going viral”, but sometimes, that virality leads to a fad rather than a bona fide business. Fads can make big money, but if your business is based on a single trend, you need to make some important decisions upfront to make sure it’s a net money-maker, rather than a money-taker.

Take the Money and Run

Within six months of introducing the Pet Rock to the marketplace in 1975, Gary Dahl earned $15 million in profits. Not knowing if his silly idea would be a hit (and way before the Internet), Dahl kept his costs low. The product that he sold for nearly $4 cost less than a dollar. He had very low overhead, introducing the product at a gift show, and selling to major stores, with a little help from free publicity obtained from a Newsweek article and two appearances on The Tonight Show.

Clearly, Dahl never intended to start a long-term business, but his one product made him an instant millionaire.

If you have an idea for a one-hit wonder — and you don’t have to expend a great deal of time and money to get it to market — go for it. As long as you don’t spend your profits on too much overhead (expensive rents or inventory, for example), you might gain enough money that you never have to work again.

Add Value

Many workout programs have come and gone (remember Suzanne Sommers and the ThighMaster?) Well, direct response retailer Beachbody has managed to take some hot properties that could have died like so many before and has given them long lives by adding value. 

Programs like P90X have been supplemented by a number of items, including program line extensions and nutritional supplements to keep the customer engaged with the products (and consumable ones that require continual purchases).  These offerings add value to the original product — and keep their programs popular today.

To remain relevant over the long term, your product needs to morph over time. If it’s a toy or other object, make it bigger or smaller, or introduce must-have accessories.  If it’s a fitness program, think about follow-up videos, nutrition and personalized coaching. And, considering that consumers get bored, do not assume a consumable product is safe. Add more flavors or accompaniments, or create a low-fat or low-calorie variety. Even cream cheese now comes in an abundance of fat levels and flavors.

Expand Your Focus

On July 8th, 2014, Crumbs Bake Shop, which focused solely (and for a time, successfully) on the cupcake trend, announced its apparent demise when they closed their doors. Six days later, they filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 bankruptcy and about a month later, they announced the planned reopening of two dozen stores, under new ownership.

The new owners plan to expand the business beyond its popular cupcakes to a variety of sweets and snacks, instead of relying on a one-item fad like a cupcake.

If you have a one-product business, keep in mind that fads lose popularity over time. Set your focus over the long-term and find ways to expand your product line to keep it fresh and interesting to customers.

A similar strategy is being used by I Want to Draw a Cat for You, which reportedly earned $200,000 in its first year, by, you guessed it- drawing cats for customers. Knowing that this Internet-led sensation would not likely be sustainable in its current form, the company expanded by adding physical products (pins, greeting cards and tee shirts) to its initial offering of customized cat-drawing services.

So, either take the money and run or evolve your core, and you may be able to make your fad worthwhile.


5 Tips for Picking the Right Business Partner

Having the perfect business partner can help you take your business to another level even faster than you could take it on your own. Not only will you have someone to bounce ideas off of, but you can also have someone whose skill sets complement your own, making you a well-rounded team. But just like any relationship, you need to date first and test the relationship, so that you don't make an expensive mistake. Breaking up a business partnership is a major distraction, so you must choose well.

Here’s how to make sure the person you pick is right for your business.

1. Pick Your Partner Carefully.

Just like you wouldn’t marry someone you barely know, it’s important that you get to know the person you want to run a business with. In other words: date before you get married in business.

How can you do that? Work on a few projects together before joining forces in business. See how you work together. Do you flow well, or do you butt heads? Do you enjoy working together?

It’s also a good idea to do a background check to know who you're getting in business with. 

2. Get an Entrepreneur's Prenup.

Even if you trust your new partner implicitly, it’s still a good idea to hire a lawyer to develop a formal partnership agreement. Make sure it addresses how money will be managed and when net profits will be shared, as well as how hiring decisions will be made, and spells out each of your roles and responsibilities. Make sure to clarify terms on exits, buyouts, death, and divorce.

Money can ruin a good partnership. Have clear policies drawn up on how money is handled, including vendor payments, reimbursements, cash withdrawals, etc. Having this document can help you if things go south and you need legal proof of your original agreement. If you agree to change the partnership agreement, legally document the change. 

3. Keep it Business.

Unless you’re married to your business partner, your relationship will do better if you focus on business and keep your ego in check. Never make decisions based on emotions, and do take your partner’s opinion into consideration. Schedule meetings to rtegularly review your financial statements together. Be open with information and clear with communication.

4. Don't Be a Credit Hog.

There is no "I" in team. Successful partnerships can be ruined when one partner wants to take credit for everything. If your partner has come up with a great idea, pat him or her on the back and make sure credit is given where it’s due. It takes teamwork to make the dream work.  If one of you dominates the relationship, the business partnership won’t last long.

5. Value a Good Partnership.

If you have a good partner and the business is successful, celebrate this. That way both will thrive. Always make sure to make decisions in the best interest of the business and not your personal self interest. Just like in any relationship it will take time and effort on your part to develop trust and keep balance in the partnership.  

Understand the value of that partnership and make concessions for the good of the partnership. Remember: this isn’t just your business anymore. You share it with someone else, and everything you do should take that into consideration.


How to Get Large Corporations as Your Customers

Big and small goldfishA dream: I have been named by Google as their exclusive supplier of educational content for all their small business resellers.

To have a large and respected corporation like Google as a customer is a small business owner’s dream. It typically brings with it a steady revenue source as well as brand prestige and recognition. This is not as unrealistic as it sounds. In fact, a driving growth factor for many small businesses is a large company as a major customer.

Getting large companies to be your customer is a common way to grow rapidly. Here are the steps to take:

  1. List the targeted large corporations. These should be ones that have a demonstrated need that your business can solve. They should have a record of buying your types of products or services from small businesses.
  2. Find the right person inside the company. Many times there is an employee that has specific responsibilities for using vendors that are small businesses or ones that are minority or women owned status. If this corporation does a large amount of work with local, state of federal governments, they may even have requirement to do a certain amount of business with your size or type of company.
  3. Find someone to help. Ask your professional and social network for introductions to people they know inside the targeted large corporations. Almost any contact will do in order to get past the traditional company gate keepers.
  4. Find a program. The SBA has specific programs designed to help small businesses get sales from the federal government. Many Chamber of Commerces also have mentor programs to link up local small business with large corporate headquarters in their area.

The influx of revenue from a large corporation can bring dangers to the small business. Here are the big ones to avoid:

1. Cash flow crunch. Many corporations negotiate longer payment terms and small businesses accept them. Be aware of the cash flow problems this can cause by paying for cost of goods or services well in advance of payments from this customer. Do the math in a cash flow statement to measure the exposure.

2. Over expansion to meet short term demand. Large corporations can boost a small businesses sales quickly but they can change course and leave just as fast. Get written longer term commitments for any major investment of capital to meet their demand.

3. Revenue concentration in one customer. Many growing businesses have at least one customer that is 25% or 50% of their revenue. This can be a precarious position for any company. Seek customer diversity as an ongoing goal.

Tell me your story on how a large corporation drove the growth of your business.


The Difference Between Being an Entrepreneur and a Franchisee

5-27 comparing smallIf you’re planning to become your own boss, one option you might want to consider is becoming a franchisee. In a franchise everything’s already laid out for you in terms of the products you’ll sell and the marketing plan. Many people prefer becoming a franchisee over starting a business from scratch. Still, there are several differences between being an entrepreneur and being a franchise owner that you should be aware of.

1. There’s Less Risk with Franchises (But Still Risk)

Many franchisees are attracted to the fact that they’re buying into a proven business. After all, there are thousands of burger franchises across the country. People are already familiar with the brand, so you don’t have to work to establish it on your own.

Still, it’s important that you know that there are risks with running a franchise. No business is guaranteed, and it will be susceptible to all the same threats as any other business, including recessions, competition, and location (a bad location for your franchise can kill the business).

2. You Have to Follow the Rules as a Franchisee

While technically, yes, you are a small business owner as a franchisee, you essentially sign up to have a master, your franchisor, who will tell you exactly how to run your business. You will sign a contract agreeing to do business the franchise’s way, and there may be penalties if you don’t.

You can’t, for example, change the brand logo, or add new products the menu. The franchise may provide you with marketing materials (though you may have some freedom in how you market locally through newspaper ads, events, and social media).

3. Being a Franchisee is Expensive

Becoming a franchisee involves paying a franchise fee to the company. This is essentially your buy-in fee to have the right to use the brand’s name and products. But you’ll also probably pay a monthly royalty fee based on your sales. When you start your own business, you pay for start-up expenses — like your website, marketing services, inventory, uniforms, etc. — as they come up, and you’re beholden to no one over the long-term.

4. An Entrepreneur Has More Creative License

Because franchisees are limited in the creative decisions they can make, many who want to color outside the lines prefer to start their own business. That way, they can set up exactly how the business will operate, what they’ll sell, and how they’ll market it. If you feel stifled by other people’s rules, franchising might not be for you.

It’s important to understand the difference between starting your own business and buying a franchise. Based on your personality and preferences either one could work for you.


3 Keys to Writing a Powerful Mission Statement

5-20 writing a mission statement smallEstablishing your identity as a small business is a challenge. At first, you may be tempted to chase every dollar you think you can get in the attempt to bring in revenue, but the fact is that if you try to appeal to everyone, you will end up appealing to no one. It is important to hone and identify your core audience as part of your business plan. In doing so, you have laid the foundation for writing your mission statement.

While there are many examples of mission statements that are so grandiose, they are almost a joke, a good mission statement clearly communicates a business's services, the type of projects in which the firm specializes, and unique values offered. For example, as the SmallBizLady, my mission is to end small business failure. It sounds simple, but it is easy to get off track. In order to write a potent mission statement, here are three considerations to get you off to the right start.

1. Give Yourself Sufficient Time to Write.

Mission statements are deceptively simple. They usually consist of a one to three sentences that provide an overview of the business and its goals. However, a good mission statement will also provide a view into the essence of what sets your small business apart from others.

Identifying and communicating your core principle may be challenging. You’ll need to write several versions and give yourself time to edit them into one cohesive statement. It is best if you allow yourself several writing sessions over a few days in order to convey it in a direct and meaningful way.

2. Communicate What Makes Your Small Business Unique.

Many a mission statement has been written on the bones of another more established company's hard work. You may be tempted to take the easy way out and "borrow" a phrase or even direct quotes from a firm you admire. It’s fine to get inspiration from other companies’ mission statements, but yours should be unique to your brand.

3. Use This as an Opportunity to Further Refine Your Business's Core Values.

Not all of us enjoy writing or even think that we can write well. However, this mindset will sap of you of your strength and undermine your confidence. At its core, writing is a powerful form of communication, and strong communication is a central tenet of doing business. It’s all about what you want to be known for.

The exercise of writing your mission statement strengthens your ability to communicate in a compelling manner. It is vital to push yourself to do this significant work in a thoughtful and conscientious way. You might even, through the act of writing, uncover core values you hadn’t elaborated on before.

Your mission statement is the cornerstone of your marketing efforts. It provides clarity and focus on the essence of your business. When you put substantial effort into the creation of this document, you create a steady foundation that helps you move forward with more vigor and determination.


Mondays with Mike: Boost Your Bottom Line With Recurring Fees

5-18 recurring fees smallAttracting and converting new customers is an important part of any business.  Revenue is the lifeblood of our companies, and it’s important to devote time and energy to ensuring we have a steady, fresh supply.  One source of revenue we shouldn’t overlook, though, is our existing customer base.  If we’re chasing down new clients without first looking at how we can maximize revenue from our current clients, we’re missing out on real opportunities.

One of the very best ways I’ve found to bump up my billing is by converting customers to a recurring fee plan.  Here’s how it works:

Say you own an HVAC company.  You have a stable of corporate clients, and when they call you for a repair, it’s never cheap.  Your average call results in a bill for $2000.  You make an average of one call per year to each client, but you’re looking for a way to increase your per client earnings.  So you offer your clients a plan.  They pay $200 each month, and when they call you, their service is covered (with appropriate restrictions of course.)  Your revenue per client has gone up to $2400 per year, and you’re providing a huge benefit to your clients as well.  Rather than having to scrape together $2K when the a/c goes on the fritz in August, they know they’re covered.  They benefit from predictable costs, and you benefit from increased revenue and predictable income.  It’s a win-win.

But there’s more: your technicians have added incentive to work efficiently, since they’re not billing by the hour.  They also have incentive to fix things properly the first time, since any shoddy work will come out of your bottom line, should they have to go back for a second repair.  Likewise, your customers will call you at the first sign of trouble, rather than waiting for a small problem to turn into a large one.

You’ll be surprised at how easily you’ll be able to convert customers to a recurring fee model.  We’re far less likely to balk at a low monthly fee than we are to experience sticker shock when we look at the annual total.  Once your customers get used to your new model, they don’t even think about that predictable monthly expense.  It’s practically invisible to them.

Nearly every business can find some way to implement a recurring fee program.  Whether you’re a liquor store that enrolls clients in a Beer-of-the-Month Club, or you’re an office supplier who bills monthly for copier servicing plans, you can find a way to make recurring fees work for your company.

The best of both worlds is when your recurring fees bring your customers even closer to you and your staff.  Creating an elite program for your top-drawer clients gives the client an ego boost and gives you a revenue boost.  You’re preserving future business, and you’re doing it in a way that lets your clients manage their costs effectively. 


How to Build “Overnight Success”…Within a Decade

Posted on by Carol Roth

5-15 long-term success smallIn a world where two clicks are too many and online purchases are about to arrive at our doors instantly via drones, we have taken the concept of instant gratification to a new level. Every new business owner envisions overnight success. But no amount of technology is likely to make up for patience and dedication.

Most companies touted as overnight successes were actually years in the making. Here are some ways that you can emulate their long-term success.

The Willingness to Do What it Takes

The major players got to where they are through hard work over the long-term and business success does not lighten the load. To this day, Howard Schultz, the CEO of  Starbucks is reported to put in 13-hour days at the office before going home to work some more.

Doing what it takes involves much more than running your daily business operations. Be prepared to get out of the office. Attend conferences that can teach you new methods within your industry or within business in general. Travel across your community, the country or even around the world to find new markets for your products or services. Check out other companies whose success you want to meet or exceed.  And don’t just try—make things happen by leaving no stone unturned.

Collaboration Over Competition

Rather than looking at other companies in your industry as competition, think of them as potential allies. Your businesses may excel in different areas that can create a winning relationship through formal or informal collaboration, ultimately leading to more success for your business.

In an article in FastCompany, Bob Mudge, President of Consumer and Mass Business at Verizon refers to this as “co-opetition,” asserting that cooperating with other companies in the same industry may seem counterintuitive to competition, but it is an essential part of business success.

You may not be ready to collaborate on the same scale as Verizon, but even customer referrals can have a huge effect on your bottom line. Just as important, your cooperative spirit builds long-term business and personal relationships that you will value for a lifetime.

Flexibility

Your initial business idea may have a great foundation, but it may require substantial tweaking before it earns success. Steve Jobs’ early inventions did not create Apple’s success. Even though the Apple Lisa introduced the world to the Graphical User Interface, it took many years of modification until the Mac was born. And it took around two decades of reinvention before the company became an overnight success.

The old motto, “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” should be posted on the wall of every business owner who really wants to make it big. Always look for ways to change or enhance your products or services until customers beat a path to your door.

Don’t Fix What Isn’t Broken

At the opposite end of the coin, you need recognize what you are doing right and stay the course. Take a lesson from the “new Coke” fiasco from back in 1985. In spite of blind taste tests that indicated that customers preferred the new formula over both Pepsi and the original Coca-Cola product, consumers flooded the company with letters of complaints. Three months later, the original formula was back on store shelves.

When loyal customers already like what you do and how you do it, don’t take it away from them. As they say, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Perseverance

When prospective customers say “no,” they often mean “not now.” If you have done your homework, you already have a good understanding of their current and future needs. Whether you re-design a product to better meet their needs or find ways to add value, make sure you keep them in the loop. Your diligence can turn “no” into a resounding “yes.”

Additionally, having patience is a key component of success.  Everything will take longer than you anticipate (and longer than it probably should) to complete, so keep moving forward, even when it seems like you are wading through quicksand.

You may  “want it all” and “want it now”, but the successful business owner is the one who can keep their eye on the prize and the big picture over time. Your hard work and patience will be the keys to making it big.




 
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