Posts Tagged ‘Entrepreneur’


6 Ways to Fix What’s Broken in Your Business

When you’ve been in business a while, it’s sometimes easier to bury your head in the sand than to deal with the issues at hand. You’re not doing your business any favors, however.  Look at these 6 scenarios, see what you can relate to, and take action to make positive changes for your company.  These are 6 ways to fix what’s broken in your business.

8-26 broken business small1. You Have Staffing Issues

One situation is that you’re a solopreneur and need help, but you can’t quite afford to hire a full-time employee. In this case, consider hiring a freelancer (great for design or marketing help), an intern (though you’ll have to do some hand-holding), or a part-time employee to fill the need. Consider hiremymom.com, to find a great stay-at-home mom great to get back into the workforce.

If your problem is more with the staff you have (especially true for those of you who hire teenagers), it’s time to firm up your discipline. Create an employee handbook to ensure that everyone knows what’s expected of them. If they’re unwilling to follow the rules, tell them to hit the road.

2. Cash Flow is a Problem

If you are biting your nails until your clients pay you so you can pay your team or your vendors, you have a cash flow problem. Sometimes, clients pay late, but you need to make sure you have a contingency plan. Here are a few strategies.

First, you can enforce either a late fee or offer an early discount for your invoices. The idea is that those late paying clients will be motivated — either to save money by paying early or to pay on time to avoid a late payment fee. Another idea is to take out a line of credit so that you can access cash when you need it, then pay it back when you get paid.

3. You Don’t Have Time to Market Your Business

You’re too busy dealing with those staffing and cash flow issues to hop on social media and update your profiles or write any new blog content. With only a trickle of customers coming through your door, marketing should be a priority.  Consider hiring a consultant or freelancer to take over some of your marketing efforts. You can pay a flat monthly rate or per article, and it may be more affordable than you’d imagine to hire a professional. The important thing is to get those customers coming back in, and then that expense won’t even matter.

4. You Haven’t Put Money Back into Your Business

As soon as you’ve paid everyone, you take out your cut. But your computer is on its last leg, you need to reorder inventory, and your business insurance is pats due. You feel like there’s just not enough money to go around. While paying yourself is critical, it’s just as important to reinvest in your business. Set aside a percentage of your profits — say, 20% — so that when you need to buy a computer or software, you’ve got the funds.

5. Your Yelp Reviews are Going Downhill

It started with a nasty review on Yelp months ago that you ignored, and now it’s snowballed. It seems like every other review is negative, and you don’t know what to do about it. It’s hurting your business. First, take action. Ignoring a bad review is like bleeding in shark-infested waters. Even if things aren’t so bad at your business, potential customers will move on after reading the negative review. But examine the complaints in those reviews. They might give you the opportunity to straighten up an attitudinal employee or polish your product.

6. You’re a Workaholic

If you’re working on the weekends, every weekend, please stop. I get it; sometimes you just need more time to get things done. But remember that you need downtime in the evenings and on weekends to recharge your battery. Otherwise you will burn out and eventually hate your business.  If you must work after hours, set a timer so you don’t end up eating an entire day that you should have been spending with your family. Set rules for yourself so you don’t check your email when you should be doing something more relaxing.


Starting Small: Why It Might Be Your Best Bet for Business Success

8-19 business growth smallWhile you may have a large-scale idea for a new business, sometimes it’s better to take just a small segment of your plan and focus on starting your business on a small level. If this is your first business, you may want to target an endeavor that will help you build skills without wiping out your nest egg. A business that can succeed on a small level gives you great training wheels for building the experience, knowledge, and competency you’ll need to take your company to the next level. Here are several reasons why it might be your best bet  to start small for business success.

1. You’ll Save Money

Starting with a narrow scope of business means you can run it out of your extra bedroom or den. You won’t have to rent office space or furnish a suite. There are even tax incentives or deductions you can take to save money as you build your business on the small side. If you do need specialized space for your endeavor, you can investigate subleasing space from other entrepreneurs, which reduces costs.

2. You’ll Need Less Capital to Get Started

Bootstrapping is an effective strategy that allows you to grow into your business and keep initial financial outlays on the low end. Instead of stressing over technology requirements and phone systems, you can concentrate on creating your sales funnel or refining your product. The fancy phone system can come later (if at all). A lean business structure keeps you flexible and focused.

3. Learn as You Go

When you base your business on a hobby, you can start by making a handful of products, selling them, then growing when you’re ready. As your business takes off, you can educate yourself in other areas of running a business, creating a formal business structure, managing employees, and meeting regulatory requirements.

4. You Can Start Today

If you set your sights on a small enterprise, the barriers are lower and you can get going more quickly. You don’t need a huge infrastructure, massive staff, or complete line of products to get started. You have no excuse for not starting your business today.

5. Your Sweat Equity is Valuable

By doing everything yourself, you learn all that's needed to keep your company going. Of course, it’s great to hire out those things that you are not able to do, but if you have direct knowhow those experiences inform your executive decisions down the road. It will also help you make better decisions that impact your customers. While financial investment is necessary to building a business, your sweat equity is just as necessary to growing your endeavor. 

6. It’s Simpler to Run

Smaller companies are lean machines and often have higher profit margins because they are simpler to run. There are fewer costs associated with overhead and administrative requirements with a small-scale business, and you can reassess market changes frequently and pivot when necessary. When big jobs come through, you can team with other small companies or hire contractors to deal with the workflow if it’s more than you can handle.

Slow and steady wins the race. Start small. Test the market. Grow with intention. Sample the cheese before you bet the farm on your idea. When it comes to small business success, the truth is: scaled-down, slower growth companies do just as well as their big sisters.


Creating a Spinoff Product Business From Your Service Business

Service providers deal in the commodity of knowledge. Your lawyer knows the intricacies of small business law. Your marketing consultant is well-versed in content marketing and social media. Your accountant knows how to minimize the hurt come tax time. All of them get paid for a transfer and application of their knowledge. But sometimes there’s an opportunity beyond providing services to create a complementary product business.

For me, as SmallBizLady, I get paid to work one-on-one with small businesses who need guidance and consultation. They pay for my knowledge and experience. But not everyone in my network can afford to hire me for a consultation. And that’s why I also offer information products at a much lower price point. People with tiny budgets can still afford to learn to be social media ninjas or become their own bosses through my books, mastermind groups and ecourses.

Catering to Two Markets: More Money for You

If you’re in a services industry, there are only so many people you can serve, especially if your prices are high. But what if you could also connect with another market, one who wants to read what you’ve learned and use it themselves to DIY whatever you’re teaching them?

What I love about having a product business is that once it’s created, I don’t have to worry about it. My products sell through my website and Amazon, and I don’t have to do anything to fulfill orders because they’re all digital products. So I’m making money on top of making money! Sound good to you?

Consider Who You’re Not Serving Currently

If you’re ready to spin off a new products business, start by considering who calls you but doesn’t end up becoming a client. What are they looking for? You’ll likely find several topics for ebooks, webinars, and courses immediately.

Do you attract a crowd of do-it-yourselfers? How can you share your knowledge to empower them to take care of specific tasks on their own? The more hands-on and detailed your instructions, the more successful your products will be.

See What’s Already Out There

You know what they say about not reinventing the wheel. Look at your competitors and see if they sell products, then figure out how you can fill a gap that isn’t currently served. Maybe you gear your content to a specific industry that you know is interested, or provide samples and templates that don’t already exist to help people.

Price Accordingly

Coming up with the perfect price point is always a challenge. You don’t want to alienate people who can’t afford your products, and you don’t want to charge so little that you don’t recuperate your expenses. Again, do some research to see what others charge and base yours on what you think you can get.

Where to Sell

Naturally, if you sell your products on your own website, you’ll get 100% of the profit, but setting up your site for ecommerce can take time and money. A quick solution is to sell on Amazon or on a digital products site like Gumroad. Yes, they’ll take a commission, but the traffic is so much better on these sites than your own, that you’ll likely make up for that chunk taken out in volume.

Adding a product business to your existing service business is the perfect balance: you provide in-real-time consulting, but you also make money while you sleep.


Four Ways to Grow Your Business With New Products and Services

Your small business may be successful, but you still need to modify your product or service offerings over time. At some point, customers no longer need what you’re selling and you also need to capitalize on new demands created by changing trends. Granted, it costs less to retain customers than to attract new ones, but you also still need to look for ways to get new customers in the door. In many cases, you will have a clear picture of what you need to do to freshen your product line. If you know you need a change but the ideas are not flowing, however, here are four ideas to spark your creative juices.

#1. Offer an Out-of-The Box Service that Complements Your Core Competency

A colleague recently told me that her doctor’s waiting room became filled with young clientele when they started offering piercings. With a small amount of extra training, this office drew in both existing and new patients because of the promise of sterile, medically-sound conditions.

Even better, this new service was quick and easy, so the added business did not affect the wait times of traditional patients. Plus, since kids and young adults were a large part of this demographic, adding this service attracted new patients who were happy to return to a cool doctor for more standard medical concerns as well.

#2. Go On-Demand

Quality services that your customers can get when they need them show that you care. Where “while-you-wait” services were limited to things like printing and oil changes, more businesses are jumping on the on-demand bandwagon. Medical offices now bring more patients in with appointment-free flu shots. And many lawyers now offer fixed-fee phone support for clients who need speedy legal advice for anything from a simple divorce to learning their rights in landlord disputes.

Even if instant turnaround is not an option for your area of business, quick convenience-oriented services added to your product mix (for example, perhaps a free Notary Public service) can capture the interest of many clients.

#3. Invest in Technology

Investing in technology can be a way to differentiate your business or can even be a new source of recurring revenue.  Consider what happens when a busy two-person auto insurance agency equips policyholders with a free auto accident app. With a few smart phone swipes, the stressed-out accident victims know what to say and do — including gathering and organizing evidence. The end result is a file that the policyholder sends to the agent, who then has everything needed to handle the claim more efficiently.

Similarly, a tax accountant can provide clients with a phone app that lets them quickly record expenses on the spot. Record-keeping becomes a no-brainer for the client. And, what tax accountant wouldn’t prefer a file that is compatible with tax preparation software over a receipt-filled shoebox during the busy tax season?

If you can make your customers’ lives easier or give them a reason to interact with your business, it can provide an easy boost.

#4. Get Mobile

The mantra “if you build it, they will come” no longer applies to business.  And many businesses have found that they can expand by doing the opposite—going to their customers directly.  Breaking away from the confines of your store or office is good for business.

Doctors making house calls was en vogue in the past and now, home health care is starting to become a value added premium service.  But, who else can benefit?

How many locals have never visited your big-city restaurant? A food truck can get them eating your food for the first time. It may even convince them to make the effort to visit your brick and mortar restaurant. Plus, investing in a food truck can be done at the fraction of the cost of a new location. Catering, anyone?

Wheels are not the only way to get mobile. You can also bring convenience to customers by expanding your presence at more locations — particularly during times of increased demand. So, if you sell anything from gift products to foot massages for sore shoppers’ feet, perhaps open a pop-up shop during the holidays or at intervals throughout the year to reach a new customer base.  Or better yet, consider a mobile delivery service for your store to get to the customer who doesn’t have time to get to you.

Embrace Change at Any Time

Even when your profits are soaring, always keep your mind open to new ideas. You may decide to add a small enhancement to an existing product that is showing signs of stagnating sales. Or, perhaps a client suggested something that sparked your interest. You don’t have to wait for times of desperation to beef up your product line. Change at any time keeps things fresh for customers — and for you, too.  Just make sure not to invest too much in any new offering before you test its compatibility with your customer base.


Finding the Right Price Point for Your Product

7-22 Pricing Strategies smallOnce you start a business, how do you know how much to charge? If your product is priced too high, it won’t sell. If it’s priced too low, you’ll be swamped with orders, and have such a small profit margin, it wont even be worth the effort. Finding the balance is the trick.

What Goes Into Cost

Your price should:

  • Cover your costs
  • Highlight the value you provide your customers
  • Earn you a reasonable profit
  • Be competitive

There is no such thing as the perfect price. It’s all about developing a price that your customers are willing to pay, that also makes you a profit. Because remember profit is how we keep score in business. Pricing effects every aspect of business because price is used to create sales projections, establish a break-even point, and calculate profit. There are three ways to find the right price for your product:

1. Look at the competition.

Use your competitor’s price as a reference point. If your product is of a higher quality, and you can justify more benefits, then you can probably justify a higher price point. The goal must be to stay competitive. If your product is knock off, then your price point will be less.

2. Calculate the total cost of your product.
This should include your hard costs (labor, materials/inventory, packaging, shipping.) You should also include a percentage of your overhead expenses such as (legal, accounting, marketing, and administrative costs.) Once you have a all your costs then you need to determine your profit margin to calculate the final price. Depending on what you sell the profit margin could be anywhere from 30 percent to 300 percent.

3. It's all about the perception of value.

Perceived value is one of the most common factors business owners use to determine product pricing. Unfortunately, some small business owners we perceive their value to be much greater than their would-be customers, which is a great way to go out of business. The main factor that adds value to a product is the brand behind it. Lots of stores sell mixers, but if you have a Kitchen Aid mixer, you have a top of the line machine. Why is that? All mixers basically function the same.

It's all about the perception of value. The Kitchen Aid mixer has a higher perceived value.

Let me give you a quick MBA lesson:

Price = (Labor + Materials) x profit margin

What that profit margin is will depend on your industry and who you’re selling to. If you’re selling wholesale, you might double what your labor and materials cost. If you’re selling retail, it might be double what you’d charge wholesale.

Don’t Compete on Price

There’s often a pull to be the cheapest seller on the block. Resist the urge, otherwise you people will assume your products are lower quality. Someone will always be able to offer similar products cheaper than you, so this is a no-win situation.

Don’t be afraid to Charge a Premium!

People pay based on perceived value. If you are confident — and competent — and can point to great work you’ve done in the past, people absolutely will be willing to pay what you charge.

Down-the-Road Discounts

It’s easier to charge more and come down in price than to start out low and then charge more. If your prices seem to be too high for your marketplace, test out different promotions and see what price point resonates with your audience. Psychologically, you may see better results simply offering a discount occasionally than to reduce your prices across the board.

Test your Price Point

Pay attention to people’s response to your prices. If you don’t want to cut your profit margin down, consider adding more value to what they get, such as a free product, or discount on future purchases.


20 Quotes to Inspire Entrepreneurs

As an entrepreneur, you are most likely a glass-half-full kind of person. Without a positive attitude, it is nearly impossible to maintain the edge that you need to keep moving forward. But, no one can be happy and confident at all times. Here are some thoughts from entrepreneurs, athletes and innovators, including one from me, that can help you look at issues with a different viewpoint — and fill your goblet to the rim.

Persistence, Success and Failure

“Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.” -Henry Ford

“Fail often so you can succeed sooner.” -Tom Kelley

“I’ve missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” -Michael Jordan

“Flaming enthusiasm, backed up by horse sense and persistence, is the quality that most frequently makes for success.” -Dale Carnegie

“Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” -Bill Gates

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take” -Wayne Gretzky

Ambition and Focus

“Ambition is a dream with a V8 engine.” -Elvis Presley

“Jet pilots don’t use rear view mirrors.” -Joel H. Weldon

“Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps, down new roads, armed with nothing but their own vision.” -Ayn Rand

“Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” -Vince Lombardi

“Entrepreneurs too often make choices based on ROE– Return on Ego– vs. ROI– Return on Investment.  A particular opportunity may make you feel great, but if that opportunity is not supporting your goal, or isn’t the best way to achieve your goal quickly and efficiently, then pursue the opportunity that will.” –Carol Roth

Leadership

“A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.” -Arnold H. Glasgow

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” -John Quincy Adams

“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” -Peter Drucker

Competition and Motivation

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.” -Steve Jobs

“And while the law of competition may be sometimes hard for the individual, it is best for the race, because it ensures the survival of the fittest in every department.” -Andrew Carnegie

“I gave it my body and mind, but I have kept my soul.” -Phil Jackson

“Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” -Theodore Roosevelt

Problem Solving

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” -Albert Einstein

“The most serious mistakes are not being made as a result of wrong answers. The truly dangerous thing is asking the wrong questions.” -Peter Drucker


Mondays with Mike: Win Customers With Your Authenticity

6-15 Be Authentic smallEven though I’m not an accountant, I understand just how important effective accounting and accountants are to running my business successfully.  A few years ago, I attended an accounting conference, and I’ll admit it:  I wasn’t very excited about it.  I hire accountants because that’s not where my natural talents lie.

But there I was, armed with a gallon of high-octane coffee, committed to sitting through what I predicted would be a boring presentation.  The featured speaker stepped up to the podium, and I nearly groaned out loud.  He was everything I was afraid he’d be:  boring suit and matching monotone voice, with a heaping helping of a snooze-worthy Powerpoint.  Making numbers interesting ain’t easy, and this guy didn’t even try.

I made it through the presentation without falling asleep and drooling on my neighbor, and I hightailed it out of the seminar, glad to be gone.  You can imagine my dismay when I attended a friend’s barbecue a few weeks later and literally bumped into the accountant speaker.  Since we were face-to-face (and because he recognized me,) I was stuck.  While I was thinking of excuses to escape, he surprised me, though.

He was actually funny.  He was relaxed, dressed casually, and he was really interesting.  It was like it had been his boring clone making the presentations, because this guy was nothing like he’d been the first time we’d met.  We were laughing about a joke he’d told when he said something that simply stunned me.  He said, “Man, I hate having to be all professional at work.  I wish I could make money just by being myself.”

I’m pretty sure I spaced out for a moment as I though about the weight of what he’d just said.  He had no idea that he was more compelling, more appealing, and even seemed more trustworthy when he was being himself.  By putting on a false front in an attempt to appear professional, the accountant was making himself fit a mold that not only wasn’t comfortable for him, but was also unappealing to his clients.

I left that barbecue with two important takeaways.  First of all, that guy is now my accountant – the very best I’ve ever had.  Secondly, I realized just how important it is to be brave enough to be our authentic selves.  In fact, it’s when we give ourselves permission to let our real personalities emerge that we’re most likely to find clients who really connect with us, our values, and our big-picture goals.

Now I’m not advising that folks stop showering or litter their sales pitches with dirty jokes, but what I am advising is that we stop trying to pretend to be someone we’re not.  Let your creativity peek out.  Give your quirky sense of humor a chance to brighten your sales presentations.  Will everyone get your off-the-wall jokes?  Probably not.  But the ones who do are more likely to end up as customers for life.

I’m reminded of the wise Dr. Seuss’ timeless advice:  “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.”  Let your authentic self shine through, and you’ll find your best, most loyal customers.


Three Ways that Viral Fads can Create Successful Businesses

Posted on by Carol Roth

6-8 instant success smallEvery entrepreneur dreams of “going viral”, but sometimes, that virality leads to a fad rather than a bona fide business. Fads can make big money, but if your business is based on a single trend, you need to make some important decisions upfront to make sure it’s a net money-maker, rather than a money-taker.

Take the Money and Run

Within six months of introducing the Pet Rock to the marketplace in 1975, Gary Dahl earned $15 million in profits. Not knowing if his silly idea would be a hit (and way before the Internet), Dahl kept his costs low. The product that he sold for nearly $4 cost less than a dollar. He had very low overhead, introducing the product at a gift show, and selling to major stores, with a little help from free publicity obtained from a Newsweek article and two appearances on The Tonight Show.

Clearly, Dahl never intended to start a long-term business, but his one product made him an instant millionaire.

If you have an idea for a one-hit wonder — and you don’t have to expend a great deal of time and money to get it to market — go for it. As long as you don’t spend your profits on too much overhead (expensive rents or inventory, for example), you might gain enough money that you never have to work again.

Add Value

Many workout programs have come and gone (remember Suzanne Sommers and the ThighMaster?) Well, direct response retailer Beachbody has managed to take some hot properties that could have died like so many before and has given them long lives by adding value. 

Programs like P90X have been supplemented by a number of items, including program line extensions and nutritional supplements to keep the customer engaged with the products (and consumable ones that require continual purchases).  These offerings add value to the original product — and keep their programs popular today.

To remain relevant over the long term, your product needs to morph over time. If it’s a toy or other object, make it bigger or smaller, or introduce must-have accessories.  If it’s a fitness program, think about follow-up videos, nutrition and personalized coaching. And, considering that consumers get bored, do not assume a consumable product is safe. Add more flavors or accompaniments, or create a low-fat or low-calorie variety. Even cream cheese now comes in an abundance of fat levels and flavors.

Expand Your Focus

On July 8th, 2014, Crumbs Bake Shop, which focused solely (and for a time, successfully) on the cupcake trend, announced its apparent demise when they closed their doors. Six days later, they filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 bankruptcy and about a month later, they announced the planned reopening of two dozen stores, under new ownership.

The new owners plan to expand the business beyond its popular cupcakes to a variety of sweets and snacks, instead of relying on a one-item fad like a cupcake.

If you have a one-product business, keep in mind that fads lose popularity over time. Set your focus over the long-term and find ways to expand your product line to keep it fresh and interesting to customers.

A similar strategy is being used by I Want to Draw a Cat for You, which reportedly earned $200,000 in its first year, by, you guessed it- drawing cats for customers. Knowing that this Internet-led sensation would not likely be sustainable in its current form, the company expanded by adding physical products (pins, greeting cards and tee shirts) to its initial offering of customized cat-drawing services.

So, either take the money and run or evolve your core, and you may be able to make your fad worthwhile.


5 Tips for Picking the Right Business Partner

Having the perfect business partner can help you take your business to another level even faster than you could take it on your own. Not only will you have someone to bounce ideas off of, but you can also have someone whose skill sets complement your own, making you a well-rounded team. But just like any relationship, you need to date first and test the relationship, so that you don't make an expensive mistake. Breaking up a business partnership is a major distraction, so you must choose well.

Here’s how to make sure the person you pick is right for your business.

1. Pick Your Partner Carefully.

Just like you wouldn’t marry someone you barely know, it’s important that you get to know the person you want to run a business with. In other words: date before you get married in business.

How can you do that? Work on a few projects together before joining forces in business. See how you work together. Do you flow well, or do you butt heads? Do you enjoy working together?

It’s also a good idea to do a background check to know who you're getting in business with. 

2. Get an Entrepreneur's Prenup.

Even if you trust your new partner implicitly, it’s still a good idea to hire a lawyer to develop a formal partnership agreement. Make sure it addresses how money will be managed and when net profits will be shared, as well as how hiring decisions will be made, and spells out each of your roles and responsibilities. Make sure to clarify terms on exits, buyouts, death, and divorce.

Money can ruin a good partnership. Have clear policies drawn up on how money is handled, including vendor payments, reimbursements, cash withdrawals, etc. Having this document can help you if things go south and you need legal proof of your original agreement. If you agree to change the partnership agreement, legally document the change. 

3. Keep it Business.

Unless you’re married to your business partner, your relationship will do better if you focus on business and keep your ego in check. Never make decisions based on emotions, and do take your partner’s opinion into consideration. Schedule meetings to rtegularly review your financial statements together. Be open with information and clear with communication.

4. Don't Be a Credit Hog.

There is no "I" in team. Successful partnerships can be ruined when one partner wants to take credit for everything. If your partner has come up with a great idea, pat him or her on the back and make sure credit is given where it’s due. It takes teamwork to make the dream work.  If one of you dominates the relationship, the business partnership won’t last long.

5. Value a Good Partnership.

If you have a good partner and the business is successful, celebrate this. That way both will thrive. Always make sure to make decisions in the best interest of the business and not your personal self interest. Just like in any relationship it will take time and effort on your part to develop trust and keep balance in the partnership.  

Understand the value of that partnership and make concessions for the good of the partnership. Remember: this isn’t just your business anymore. You share it with someone else, and everything you do should take that into consideration.




 
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