Posts Tagged ‘employee selection’

How to Retain Talented Employees In Your Small Business

9-23 Retail employees smallIn your business, your team is everything. Even if you follow the guidelines from my blog on how to hire your first employee on the best practices for hiring and interviewing candidates, some bad seeds will still find ways to slip through the cracks. It’s not just poor workers who will affect how your team pool changes. Millenials, who comprise the largest generation currently working, have exhibited a trend of job-hopping in search of the best job with the highest compensation. The goal for you, as a small business owner, is to prevent your most talented employees from jumping ship. Here are some tips for how to retain your best and brightest employees.

1. Think Long-Term

If it’s financially impossible to increase an employee’s compensation, you need to remind him/her that one day it will be. Be sure that all of your employees have a concrete idea of what your vision is for your business and what role they’ll play in helping your get there. Make them understand why you do what you do. If you voice how much you believe in yourself and your team, the desire to stay working for you and helping you reach that goal will follow. If you treat your employees well, they’ll trust you enough to know that when you become successful, so will they.

2. Compensate Fairly

Depending on the skill and education levels you require for your position, compensation will play a large role in obtaining and keeping talented people in your circle. A paycheck and its accompanying benefits are a huge factor when workers consider leaving for another employer. Do you offer health benefits, a retirement package or an annual review during which good work is rewarded with a raise? You should consider all of these things and figure out compensation that is fair to keep you best employees

3. Give Perks

While small business owners have the desire to compensate employees very well, we all know money can get in the way. If you can’t financially afford to pay your employees exactly what they deserve, figure out what else you can do to balance the scale. Sculpt a laidback, but professional, work culture where creativity and inter-office friendships are encouraged. Offer paid vacations and sick days, maternity and paternity leave or the use of your equipment for an employee’s side project. Time is free, and if you feel that your employees might deserve more than what they see in their paychecks, there’s no harm in offering other benefits to them.

4. Offer Growth Opportunities

Talented employees are people who crave responsibility and growth. If you’re sure an employee is someone you want to keep on your team, offer him/her the opportunity to take on more challenging and engaging work. This will keep your employee interested while also preventing the job from becoming mundane or predictable. Keep your talented employees on their toes with more demands. They will see and feel the trust and faith you have in them.

You need your employees and they need you too. You will run across your fair share of bad employees during your time as an entrepreneur, but when you begin adding really valuable, talented employees to your team you need to know how to hold on them. It will be the best thing you can do for your business.

5 Tips to Prepare for Your Next Phone Interview

Phone Interview - Recruitment teamApplying for a new career opportunity is a job in and of itself. After submitting countless applications, you finally receive an email or phone call from a recruiter at one of the companies you applied to (maybe even your dream job!) asking to schedule a brief phone interview. You’ve done it! You’ve finally been picked out of a pool of applicants to take the first step toward landing a job. Now what?

Nextiva’s corporate recruiting team shares their top five tips to prepare for, and nail, your all important phone interview.

Treat the phone interview like an in-person interview. 

Often times, this is the first human interaction you’ve had with the company and you want to make a good impression. You don’t get a second chance to sell the recruiter on why you’re the right fit for the job and the company. It is just as important to be well spoken and prepared during the phone interview as it is for the in-person interview.

Nailing the phone interview is extremely important in moving along in the hiring process, and generally the recruiter or HR representative you are speaking with has significant influence in the decision-making process of who continues on, and whose resume gets tossed out.

Research the company and what they do.

Do your research. There is nothing worse than being asked a question during the phone interview about the company you are apply to and not knowing the answer. Review the company’s website, social media channels, Glassdoor profile, recent news, etc.

At the very least, you should know what they do, their history, their mission, the market they serve, any distinguishing market characteristics, etc. You will want to tie these details in to the answers you provide about why you want to work at the company and how your beliefs with the company’s mission and goal. This will show the recruiter that you are serious about the position and differentiate you from other candidates.  

When asked questions, provide concise and direct answers.  

Put yourself in the recruiter’s shoes. No one likes to listen to long-winded answers where the point isn’t made until the end, if at all. As the one being interviewed, you want to keep the recruiter engaged in what you have to say and make your answers memorable. With that said, it doesn’t mean you need to answer questions like a robot. Provide genuine answers and let your personality shine through.

Understand the role you applied for as much as you can. If anything is unclear, ask for clarification.

Recruiters and hiring managers spend a lot of time on those job descriptions so take the time to read through it before your phone interview. Jot down notes of experience you have that relates to each responsibility and job function—providing specifics in your phone interview will help you stand out. This will solidify that you are qualified and a good fit for the position.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Since you’re in the early stages of the hiring process, now is the time to clarify any responsibilities or job functions you’re unclear on. This will give you more insight in to the role and the company that isn’t written in the job description. The recruiter should be selling you on the position and the company just as much as you are selling your experience and personality.

Follow up with an e-mail thanking them for their time and consideration.

The power of the thank you email (or better yet, card) is not dead. The little details really matter when it comes to differentiating candidates. As with an in-person interview, you should show your thanks and appreciation for the time they gave you. The number of candidates that don’t send a thank you email would surprise you. Even if you do not receive a response, the gesture does not go unnoticed and makes you stand out.

We hope these tips help you as you prepare for your next phone interview. The job hunt can be daunting, but with a little planning, research and preparation, you can land your dream job.

To learn more about Nextiva and career opportunities available, visit

How to Organize Your Business to Hire Your First Employee

"Staff Wanted" SignFrom your very first hire, you want to make sure you are attracting the kind of employees who will be an asset to your company. You want that first employee to be a hard-working, conscientious individual that you won’t break the bank to hire. But it goes deeper than that. Hiring your first employee requires plenty of planning and reflection to understand your staffing needs and your management style. Your first staff could be the freelancers you need to the full-time admin you need to offload some of your backend tasks.

Start with the Tasks You Need Help With

Before you write the job description that will help you attract the right people, start by simply brainstorming about the tasks you need help with the most. Initially, the list may be helter-skelter, with some admin tasks, some marketing, some finance, and so on. But as you complete the list, start to sort them into categories so you can determine what type of role you need to hire for. Then prioritize those job tasks so you can tackle the most important ones with your first hire.

It’s helpful to divide this list into the following categories. Each job description you put together will likely include some of each:

  • Critical tasks
  • Routine tasks
  • Occasional tasks

Consider Your Hiring Options

Full-time isn’t your only option here, and if your budget is small, it might be further down the road. You can also consider the following:

Part-Time Employee

A part-time staff member typically works 15-30 hours a week, and you aren’t required to pay health benefits for them, typically.  The perk to part-time is that you can adjust worker schedules to reflect the needs of your business. The downside is fewer people are looking for part-time roles.

Temporary Workers

Usually you hire a temp worker through an agency. They’re ideal if you need help for a few weeks or months, as you can let them go when your busy season is over. Another advantage of this option is if you don't like the worker, you can call and get another one.


Working with freelancers or 1099 employees can help with short-term needs, such as getting your website designed or handling your virtual admin needs. You don’t pay social security or payroll taxes for contractors. One perk is that you can test out contractors to see how you like them, and then hire them full-time if they are an asset to your business.


A cost-friendly staffing option is the intern. Look to a local college to find a low or no-cost intern who’s studying a field that you need help in. Once the semester is over, however, you lose your cheap labor. Still, if you like their work, you can always hire them.

Next, Write Your Job Description

Now that you’ve defined the tasks you need your first employee to tackle, organize them into separate jobs.  This is important so that you’re not trying to recruit an amazing admin who not only can file but can also file your taxes, manage your social media, give you a manicure, and run your IT department!. Now, it’s time to organize your thoughts into a job description.

The more detailed your job description, the more likely you will be to find exactly the right fit for the role you need to fill. I like to write down everything that employee could possibly be asked to do so that there are no surprises down the road.

Start Your Search

With that job description, look in as many places as possible to maximize your search. You can (and should) open your job search up to:

  • job boards
  • recruiters
  • social media
  • your network

Let everyone know you’re hiring, since referrals are an excellent source for great employees.

If you’ve spent the time up front to clearly identifying the type of employee you need, you should be rewarded with one who will help you take your business to the next level.

Improve Your Customer Service–By Letting Us See Your Tats!

2-20 tattoos at work smallResponding to tens of thousands of employee requests, Starbucks recently announced sweeping changes to its tattoo policy, now allowing customer-facing employees to exhibit them everywhere except on the employee’s face. (Previously, employees had to hide tattoos under long clothing, which as you can imagine made things uncomfortable in a long day working over hot steam.) Dress codes, too, have been loosened to allow more expression in accoutrements, scarves, and the like, and piercings have been significantly deregulated.

Are these sensible, bottom-line minded moves Starbucks is making, and that you should consider for yourself as a leader and businessperson? I would argue that the answer to both questions is yes.

Customers are searching for the genuine, the authentic

Today’s customers have a well-developed sense of the genuine, and "genuine" is something that they look for from a brand.  I find as a customer service consultant that my clients who allow their employees self-expression on the job–in language, clothing, and, yes, tattoos–are better able to deliver a genuine customer experience that connects with the customer.

Letting employees express their personal style, tats and all

In other words: letting employees revel in their own style is a way to project how genuine you are as a brand to employees and to the customers they support. Your customers—including the important millennial generation that will soon be the dominant breed of consumer in the marketplace—project their own style through their clothing choices, tattoos, and hairstyles, and by and large they're fine with your employees doing the same. As fellow customer service designer Tim Miller expressed it to me recently, in a customer-facing business you should strive for a visible symbiosis between the people working at your establishment because it fits their lifestyle, and the customers doing business with you because it fits their lifestyle.

Choosing the best employees, not just the ones without tattoos and piercing

The second reason is even more important: Employees with the potential to be great all share certain key personality traits (Warmth, Empathy, Teamwork, Conscientiousness, Optimism [WETCO] is my list),  but what they don’t share is a particular look. And as an employer, what you’re looking for, praying for, dreaming of, are great employees. Not necessarily Darien-bred or Oxbridge-accented employees (in fact, sometimes these are exactly the kinds of employees you want to avoid in the service industry, if they come with an attitude to match), but employees with the potential to be great in all the empathetic and creative ways that a customer-facing employee needs to be great.

This principle is epitomized by a front-of-house service professional in Bermuda named Nick DeRosa, about whom I've written before.  Mr. DeRosa is head doorman at the Fairmont Southampton and one of the greatest front-of-house employees you’ll ever meet.

DeRosa has a tattoo on his neck, all capital letters that says “NICK” so large and visibly that his much-smaller name tag serves pretty much as decoration rather than identification.

Based on an appearance checklist, Nick would hardly be the likeliest candidate to be chosen as the first person guests encounter at this grand luxury hotel, yet they selected him anyway, based on his personality and smile, and it’s clear it’s one of the best personnel decisions the hotel has ever made. Not only is his own performance stellar but he is an inspiration to the employees who work for and with him to up their own game. So I hold the example of DeRosa out to you and ask you this: Why lose a potentially great service person who made a questionable (to you) stylistic choice earlier in their lives—or even made one last night?

Get over your hiring inhibitions

You may get some pushback from whoever your pushbackers are, saying that some studies do show that, all things being equal, an untattooed, unpierced employee is viewed more favorably by mainstream customers than one who is decorated in the modern fashion. But all things are never equal. All employees are not equal. And I would argue that you want the tattooed employee if the tattooed employee is otherwise a future star for you.

Revise your HR guidelines

So: Are you reluctant to (and/or do your hiring guidelines prohibit you to) employ otherwise-qualified candidates who sport tattoos, weird hair, cheek piercings, and the like?

Well, if so, I do understand. I really do. But I want to challenge you to consider that, perhaps, your thinking is out of date. Anachronistic. Please evolve as quickly as you can, for the sake of your employees, your customers, and your bottom line.

Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 5 Things to Look for When Hiring Customer Service Reps

Waiting Room: Receptionist Takes Insurance CardWhen hiring customer service reps, you need to do more than assess the job candidate’s experience and dot the i’s and cross the t’s on a job application. Here are five factors that are just as important as experience, and how to assess them during the interview process.

  1. Friendliness. Natural curiosity about others, openness and willingness to engage and ask questions are key characteristics of a good customer service employee. Small talk during the interview is a good way to explore how friendly a job candidate is. (Just be sure you talk steer the conversation to topics interviewers are forbidden to ask about, such as whether a candidate is married, has children or how old they are.)
  2. Ability to handle negativity. Good customer service representatives deal with negative emotions (their own and other people’s) in a mature way and, ideally, turn negative situations around. In addition to asking employees about a negative person at their prior job and how they dealt with him or her, try putting them to the test by incorporating stressful situations into the interview, such as telling them the interview is delayed and having the receptionist observe how they behave while waiting, having other employees continually interrupt the interview, or having your receptionist purposely be rude to them so you can see how they react.
  3. Multitasking ability. Customer service requires being able to multitask. A representative might be on the phone with one customer while dealing with a queue of other customers on hold. He might be assisting an indecisive customer at the point-of-sale in a store while the line of impatient customers is growing by the minute. Try setting tasks that incorporate multitasking or distractions, such as taking a written test in a room where the candidate has also been told to answer the phone, or interrupting the test to have the candidate complete a form or sign a document.
  4. Pleasant demeanor. A calming presence and soothing speaking voice can go a long way toward making ruffled customers feel better. If the employee will be dealing with customers on the phone, try conducting a pre-interview by phone to see how he or she comes across. You might be able to eliminate candidates who don’t present themselves well by phone and save yourself some interview time.
  5. Emotional awareness. Often called “emotional intelligence” or EQ (like IQ), emotional intelligence incorporates many facets, but basically it’s the ability to sense and respond appropriately to others’ emotions. A customer service rep with high EQ will know when a complaining customer just wants to be heard more than he or she wants an actual solution, when customers are in a rush and need to get off the phone quickly, or when customers need to be escalated to the next level of service before the situation deteriorates.

When interviewing customer service candidates, be sure to trust your gut. If a job candidate doesn’t put you at ease and you don’t enjoy interacting with the person, your customers probably won’t, either.

Build A Customer-Focused Corporate Culture–By Making A (Very Tough) Decision

1-29 Building blocks smallIf your aim is to build a truly customer-focused culture in your organization, here are two difficult steps to take that will make it happen. These two steps that will change your world–if you really want it changed.

1. Decide.  For example:  “We provide only the highest level of service to our customers, our associates, and our vendors.”  That’s a cultural decision.

2. Get to work figuring out what your decision will mean organizationally and behaviorally.  Because it is going to affect everything. Everything. Including:

  • The way you hire–select– your customer-facing employees. You'll need to stop hiring on a hunch, or just for technical skills, or haphazardly.  Instead you'll need to get scientific about finding the right employees to do the right kind of job for your customers: that "highest level of service" that you've just committed to.
  • Support: You'll need to give those employees great support: in terms of onboarding, training, inspiration, reinforcement, coaching, and setting appropriate standards for service functions.
  • Empowerment: You’ll need to empower those employees to make their own decisions to help your customers (including, sometimes, the decision to deviate from the standards you set down in my previous bullet point!
  • Personnel policies and employee treatment: You’re going to have to revise any inhumane and punitive personnel policies that currently serve to demoralize these important people.
  • Building and maintaining the workers' toolbox: You’ll need to  provide your employees with a proper, and properly maintained toolbox – literally (if they’re carpenters, machinists, or janitors) or figuratively (if they’re not) – that they need to do their best work
  • Broadening your benchmarks: You’ll need to look beyond your own industry for service quality benchmarks.  Your decision to provide the “highest level of service” should mean the highest level anywhere, not just the highest among tire manufacturers or whatever your specific niche. Benchmark those high standards, and strive to reach them.
  • You’ll need to–and you'll need to involve every one of your employees in–looking at your processes, systems, and behaviors as if from a customer viewpoint (this is not easy at all, and once you do it, I promise you you will need to change even more.  And it’ll be worth it.

The New Leaderboard: How Gamification Can Motivate Your Team

12-19 leaderboard smallIn traditional sales environments, managers would often keep leaderboards as a visual representation of employee performance. Achieving the top spot on the leaderboard gives employees something to aspire to, igniting the spirit of competition among team members.

As the business world has become increasingly mobile, however, it’s less common to have all employees in the same physical location. This eliminates the possibility of a traditional leaderboard, but the benefits of such a visual tool still remain. For businesses with multiple workers, an automated leaderboard is a great way to motivate employees and achieve better results. For that reason, gamification is growing in popularity among sales teams across the country. There are a variety of uses for gamification in an organization. Here are three ways this tool can be put to use in your small business.

Time and Attendance

Showing up for work every day should be a given, but as many business owners know, reliability can be a real problem for some employees. Perhaps taking a lesson from schools that issue certificates for consistent attendance, some software providers are incorporating gamification into their HR efforts. Kronos’s Workforce Central 7 has a points-based rewards system that provides positive reinforcement for activities like perfect attendance, timely approval of timecards, bonuses for overtime, and more.

Customer Support

Many companies are finding ways to improve customer support processes. However, healthcare company OmniCare learned through experience that gamification should be customized to the type of employees. After unsuccessfully deploying a leaderboard with cash rewards for its helpdesk, the company realized that its technology-oriented workers felt overly watched instead of motivated. After adjusting the program to one that more adequately motivated its helpdesk employees—one that issued challenges and gave non-cash rewards—OmniCare saw a dramatic improvement in its helpdesk performance.


Gamification is perhaps most popular in sales departments, since companies so often rely on sales teams to bring in revenue. Sales tools like Hoopla,,, and Salesforce’s offer incentives to employees through performance rewards, leaderboards, and countdown clocks. Like,, and, Hoopla can be incorporated into Salesforce and handled along with a manager’s other responsibilities. Rewards aren’t simply badges and virtual awards, either. Businesses can build in real rewards like gift cards to make hosting contests easier for managers.

Before choosing a gamification program, however, it’s important that businesses understand which incentives appeal to the team members in question. In 2012, Gartner documented this issue, predicting that by 2014, 80 percent of all gamification programs would fail due to poor design. This hasn’t happened, however, due in part to the evolution of Big Data. Businesses are interested in measuring performance and improving operations and gamification is a way to incentivize employees to do things differently.

How can gamification be used in your organization? Only you know. But there are many tools available to help you reach out to your employees and make them excited to come to work each day. One of the best things about gamification is that it challenges employees and makes work fun, which tends to get better results than repeated staff meetings to remind workers of their objectives.

Four Crazy HR Ideas To Ignore – And Six Guiding Principles To Follow

Boutique: Owner with Help Wanted SignWrongheaded, even crazy, HR advice tends to be delivered emphatically, as if passed down from Moses, but that doesn’t make it any truer for the delivery.

Misinformation–myths–about how to hire (or “select," which is the term I prefer) and treat employees can destroy your attempts at building a rich and sustainable corporate culture and can make a hash of your leadership. Here are four of them in particular that I urge you to reject:

1. Snappy but utterly insane advice like “hire slowly, fire quickly.” Try this sometime. Or better, don’t. "Hire slowly" certainly has its good points, but "fire quickly" applied to those who aren't immediately successful means you're throwing away human potential in a way that is completely cruel:  a blip on a resume and wasted resources for your company, not to mention the shockwaves felt by those left un-fired.  In my experience great companies certainly don't ignore the failures of initially unsuccessful employees, but they engage in the more difficult "coach quickly," "make adjustments quickly," and "amp up the training" rather than the kneejerkish "fire quickly."

2. Advice like, Go on your gut.”  If people went on their guts, they wouldn’t hire, well, let’s see:  people of different ethnicities, people of different ages, people of different religious backgrounds, single people for the CEO job. And no way in Helsinki would they hire tattooed, pierced, possibly hoodied Millennials, no matter how great their potential.

3. Advice like, “Turnover is inevitable.  You can manage this fact, but you’ll never transform it.”  (This is especially dangerous advice to take as gospel when employing younger workers (millennials), since it fits with the generational assumption — to some extent true — that millennials don’t expect to work with you forever.  If you consider anyone disposable, you increase the chances they'll live up to/down to your expectations. )

4. Advice like, You can’t work successfully with a union:”  Clearly, people who say this ignore companies like Southwest Airlines — the most unionized airline in a unionized industry—who have great employee relations, with management actually striving to learn from the “other side” at each negotiation, Fairmont Hotels, Host Marriott… The incoming workforce of Millennials, by the way, are the most pro-union generation in quite some time.  Even if it is largely theoretical for them, the anti-union rhetoric isn’t going to win you points with them.

Six Guiding Principles 

Fortunately, there are tested approaches, antithetical to all this idiocy, that help companies thrive every day, while the naysayers nay. The model I use in my corporate culture consulting draws not only from my own experience but from the model of superior service-focused companies like Mayo Clinic, Starbucks, Southwest Airlines, USAA Insurance, Marriott, Auberge Resorts and others, as well as the work of a few true visionaries in the field include the creators of the Ritz-Carlton Hotels And Resorts and the work of Brad Black of HUMANeX Ventures.

1. Hiring — “selecting” – employees has to be systematic. Your approach to whom you select to work in your company, and in which position you place them, needs to be based on science, not on hunches, politics, whims.

[Quick Refresher: Here, speaking broadly, are the underlying personality traits that make for a great customer-facing employee. They spell “WETCO”):

• W is for Warmth: Simple human kindness
• E is for Empathy: The ability to sense what another person is feeling
• T is for Teamwork: An inclination toward ‘‘Let’s work together to make this happen’’ and against ‘‘I’d rather do it all myself"
• C is for Conscientiousness: Detail orientation, including an ability and willingness to follow through to completion
• O is for Optimism: The ability to bounce back and to not internalize challenges. Optimism is a necessity in customer-facing positions.

Similarly, your approach to getting recruits from whom to choose needs to be relentlessly systematic: As Brad Black puts it, "ABS: Always Be Scouting";This allows you ultimately to be able to choose from perhaps the top 1% rather than forced to make do with the top 10% of those who apply.

2. You need an integrated approach to employee development: Great hiring is never enough. In everything else related to employees, you need to be systematic. You need a system of HR. Not just in hiring, but in reviewing your talent for advancement (and lateral moves): you need an integrated approach

3. Go overboard with the onboard:  Onboarding—orientation and the first weeks of employment— matters.  Make sure employees are welcomed, and oriented by a power in the organization, and onboarded by the team they will be working with.

4. Employees need design input and performance leeway: Employees need to have input into the design of, and leeway in the  performance of, their work — and you as an employer need them to have this input and leeway.  (Fill this in with info from high-tech high-touch on both a) design input and b) autonomy

5. Employees need a purpose to their work – and you as a leader need them to have a purpose, in order to get the most out of them.

6. Employees are an asset, not just an expense. Don’t just hire and then try to minimize turnover.  Select and then maximize potential of your asset.  It requires more forethought and dedication, but ultimately it's vastly more effective and sustainable.

Where to Find Your Next Employee

12-11 Looking for employees smallSix years after the Great Recession, national unemployment is finally dropping. At 5.8 percent, it is the lowest since 2008. This poses a problem for small business owners who need to find the best people to fill open positions at their company. Unfortunately, posting jobs on various sites like Craigslist or Monster can bring in a lot of unqualified people and be expensive. For most small businesses, hiring a recruiter that collects 25% of the first year’s compensation is out of reach. The key is to find those individuals that have the required skills and the cultural fit at a reasonable search price.

Here is the best way to do it:

  1. Ask current employees. People socialize with other people like them. If a company wants to find more similar employees, ask the current staff. Pay a $250 to $1,000 bonus for any employee that refers a candidate and stays for at least 90 days.
  2. Post openings on the website. Many candidates are doing job searches through Google, Yahoo! and Bing. Posting job descriptions with the appropriate search keywords will get the opportunity found by those who are looking.
  3. List the opening in every employee’s email signature. Use a simple sentence and link in the signature of every outgoing email from the company. For example, “We are growing! We need sales and marketing superstars. Check out these opportunities”. Then add the appropriate hyperlink for the website.
  4. Search employees at competitors on LinkedIn. Find competitors who have the employees that your company is looking for. Get connected to them and see if they are interested in making a switch. Some websites even list key employees. Alternately, competitors can be called to find out the names of people who hold positions that could be candidates for your company.
  5. Niche job boards. Look at the smaller job boards that focus on a specific job candidate. For example, HealthCareJobsite is for health care positions and Hoojobs for PR. The more niched the job board, the better the quality of applications you will receive. Fifty more niche job boards are listed here. A company may even find a candidate at freelance sites like Elance and oDesk.  
  6. Ask social media. Post weekly (or as a tab on the company’s Facebook page) the types of job candidates that the business needs. This will allow followers to spread the word as well.
  7. Search trade shows or other industry events. Many of these have job boards. In addition, see who is speaking on various panels to source higher level positions. I also saw one company executive once at a show wearing a button that said “I am looking to hire you.”

Where do you find your best employees?

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