Posts Tagged ‘Employee Management’


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 5 Tips for Keeping the Peace in Family-Owned Business

If you run a family-owned business, you know that hiring, managing and motivating non-family employees can sometimes be a challenge. Employees may think there’s no room for advancement or that the decks are stacked against them because they aren’t family members. How can you avoid these problems? Try these tips.

  • Stocksy_txp4bfbd52fKr2000_Small_131353 (1)Compensate them fairly. Family employees typically have ownership or stock in the family business or enjoy other perks in addition to their salaries. While you may not want to reward non-family employees the same way, it’s important that you find other ways to compensate them financially. Consider offering bonuses or setting up a profit-sharing plan so employees feel they are sharing in the success of the business they work hard to grow.
  • Offer them opportunities for advancement. Promoting from within is a smart strategy for any small business, but particularly in a family business. This practice shows non-family employees that working hard, getting results and being loyal to the business pay off…even if your last name is different than the owner’s.
  • Empower them. Non-family employees in supervisory or management roles often become disgruntled if they feel like they have no real power in the business. If you give a non-family employee a management position, be sure you also give him or her the authority to make the decisions that go with that role, including disciplining family members who aren’t living up to expectations.
  • Communicate with them. Family members who work in a business naturally end up discussing business during their off-hours, which can leave non-family members feeling left out if they don’t get the same information. When your business includes non-family employees, it’s crucial to communicate openly and clearly. Otherwise, non-family employees will feel as if they’re being kept in the dark, and rumors and misinformation will start to spread.
  • Treat family members professionally. It’s easy to slip into a trap of treating family employees one way and non-family employees another. Be sure to maintain professionalism when dealing with family employees—it makes everyone on the staff feel like they’re on a level playing field.

By following these tips, you’ll build lasting bonds and loyalty among your non-family employees.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Getting Organized Using Project Management Software

91c5acd957b95442_Organize_Your_Desk.previewWas one of your New Year’s resolutions to be more organized in your business? If you work with a lot of freelancers, outside contractors and vendors in addition to your in-house employees, you know that managing all of the deadlines, data and scheduling involved can get confusing. Project management software can help you get it all under control.

Basecamp and Zoho Projects are two project management tools I’ve used and like, but there are plenty of others out there to investigate as well. Begin by figuring out what you need from a project management tool and whether you want to replace, or simply augment, your existing systems. For example, do you need to schedule and assign tasks, then track completion? Do you need to collaborate on documents and projects online? Do you need to track employees’ or freelancers’ time and billable hours? There are tools that can do some or all of this.

As you research different project management tools, keep these factors in mind:

Size: How many people will be using the tool, including both in-house staff and outside contractors, vendors or clients? Choose something that can grow with your business, but isn’t too big or cumbersome for your current needs.

Ease of use: Some tools are very simple while others are more complex and allow for a greater level of detail. If a tool is too complex for you and your team to learn easily, you probably won’t use it—so be realistic.

Cost: Most project management tools are either free, offer free trials or have free versions with lesser options. Don’t assume you can get away with a free option, though—if you need more than the free tools provide, make room for it in your budget.

Security: Sharing company data can get risky, so make sure the project management tool you select has the controls you need for security, such as enabling you to set different levels of access or permission. You don’t want a client viewing sensitive internal documents by accident.

Of course, the most important step in making project management work is getting everyone trained on the tool and ensuring they actually use it. Don’t let people slip back to old ways or do a mish-mosh of old and new. Set an example by using the new tool yourself and getting everyone on board. 


Mondays with Mike: 7 Simple Steps to Improving Office Morale

Worried about post-holiday doldrums in the office?  Afraid that short of spiking the coffee with Prozac, there’s little you can do about it?  Fear not!  These simple tips can help you brighten the mood and invigorate your staff.

  1. 10-tips-for-boosting-employee-morale-pop_6697Daily Huddle.  Don’t sweep your office problems under the rug.  Take a few minutes each day to air out concerns and address practical solutions.  Let your staff know that you’re making changes by giving them regular updates on the concerns they’ve expressed.  Tip:  Hold the meeting standing up.  You’re more likely to keep people on topic and to-the-point.
  2. Schedule Change-Up.  Offer your staff a chance to shift their schedules a bit.  It’s amazing what a little flex-time can do.  You’ll see refreshed, focused faces if you give your employees the chance to get out of their rut.
  3. Focus on the Why, rather than the What.  No matter what you do, you can benefit from reflecting on why you’ve chosen your field.  Accountants’ offices may not be the most exciting places to work, but if you can get your team focused on the real benefits they provide to your clients, then you can invigorate your staff and get them ready to tackle even the crunch of tax time.  Focus on your purpose.
  4. Say Thank You.   Simple.  Free.  So important.  Take the time to let your staff know that you appreciate their hard work.
  5. Listen.  Any good customer service rep will tell you that the first step to resolving a problem is to let the customer vent.  If a member of your staff has a complaint, it’s important that they be able to voice their concerns.  If a frustrated employee has no place to vent appropriately, then the dissatisfaction will spread to other members of the staff.  The important tip here is to let your staff air their grievances in private if possible, preventing the negative attitude from multiplying and giving you the opportunity to address legitimate complaints.
  6. Take the Bullet.  Does your staff have a gripe about a particularly unpleasant or difficult task?  Is there something standing in their way – an obstacle that needs to be overcome?  Be the hero!  If you step in and show that you’re not just willing to pitch in, but able to solve problems for your staff from time to time, you cement your position as the solution-finder extraordinaire.  By modeling the willingness to roll up your sleeves and get dirty on occasion, you’re setting the example of being a problem-solver.
  7. Change of Scenery.  Monotony is the slayer of enthusiasm.  Get your employees out of the office for a day and see how their collective outlook improves.  Pick a charity and spend the day volunteering, and when you return, have a new coffee maker or new desk chairs for your staff waiting for them.  Shaking up the routine can make your staff as enthusiastic as they were on their first day.

You’re the captain of the ship.  Keep tabs on morale and make sure you brighten up the office when necessary.  


Work Your Biz Wednesday: How to Make Tax Season Easier

2014 is here, and tax season is upon us! Make sure you are ready to go with these tips from The Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


2014 Resolutions: How to Promote Wellness in Your Company

office-yogaWith the New Year right around the corner, everyone is thinking about how to get back into shape, improve what they eat and live better lives. That way of thinking can easily be applied in the office setting and, according to Lisa Menninger, a corporate wellness consultant, business owners are smart to incorporate health-related practices during the workday.

“For every dollar a company spends on wellness, they get back $5 to $6 in decreased insurance claims, a decreased number of employee sick days and an increase in general efficiency on the job,” she says.

Here are a few easy ways to promote wellness in your company:

Start a walking club

Chances are good that your employees are looking to get healthier in 2014. Help them in their effort by creating a walking club where a group meets for a 30-minute stroll at lunch or after work, recommends Menninger. Establish a daily meeting time and ask a staff volunteer to lead the group. Better yet: divide leadership responsibilities between a few people to increase the chances of the program lasting past January.

Throw out the break room

Take inventory of the snacks in your break room. Are you finding chips and dip or carrots and hummus? If your answer is the former, it’s time to get out the trashcan and start over.

“Don’t stock fake creamer or fruit juices. Instead, cut up veggies and put them out on the table,” suggests Menninger. “I promise that those goodies will be gone in no time. By supplying the room with healthy snacks, your employees will no longer reach for the other stuff. They will be fuller longer or have more energy to get work done.”

Launch a health-related newsletter

Take a moment to think about your staff members. Who is the healthiest person in your office? The person who runs races on the weekends or talks about his or her yoga retreats on a regular basis?

“If you have someone in your group that can recognize good information, ask that person to circulate blogs on health topics or create an internal newsletter to help motivate employees throughout the year,” says Menninger. “Either that, or give the person a corner of your existing newsletter to write a column about health.” 


Work Your Biz Wednesday: 5 Things Your Employees Need

Support your employees and develop a win-win relationship to help your business succeed. Learn how with this week's Work Your Biz Wednesday video from The Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


How to Plan the Perfect Corporate Off-Site Event

Holding a company event outside the office can be a useful way to bond a team and allow employees to relax and enjoy each other’s company without having to talk about work. It can, though, get a little overwhelming to try to plan such an event. Here, Anne Marie Rembold, owner of Anna Marie Events, a corporate event planning company based in San Francisco, offers her top insights.

Start with the money

What is the budget for your corporate off-site event? Establish a number and go from there. Don’t start looking into activities or locations before confirming a budget with your team as costs can quickly get out of hand, says Rembold.

Pick a venue

When choosing a venue, consider where your employees will be coming from, how they will be getting to the venue (public transportation or vehicle) and if you will offer alcohol at the gathering (a vital consideration for drivers).

“Then, go back to your budget,” she says. “Make sure you understand every layer of cost associated with your location. Will gratuity be included? Will there be additional service fees? What about room rental fees? After looking at all of those factors, determine if the venue still fits into your budget.”

447-corporate-team-building-events-with-way2go-adventures-ltdChoose an activity

Off-site activities should be inclusive to most people (hopefully everyone) on your team. Stick with pursuits such as mini golfing, corn hole or Bocce ball. “I also really like cooking events because it doesn’t matter how good of a cook you are, you can still have fun and learn something,” Rembold says. “It is important to choose activities that are lighthearted and level the playing field.”

Communicate with your employees

Think of yourself as a party promoter, you want to build buzz around the office. Generate excitement by announcing the event at least a month in advance. “Remind your team again two weeks out and then three to five days in advance,” she says. “You want to keep it front-of-mind so they are talking about it with their colleagues.”

Plan your food and beverage

Regardless if you are going to a bowling alley or a mini golf course, it is always a good idea to provide food and refreshments for your staff. Think hard about alcohol. It may not be necessary if the event is in the middle of the day. If, though, it is scheduled for the evening, you may consider offering beer and wine or even a full bar.

“But I wouldn’t plan for the entire event to revolve around alcohol,” says Rembold. “If it does, people who don’t drink or are trying to cut back could feel really uncomfortable.”

Stay on top of logistics

Logistical considerations—namely transpiration, directions and maps—are of utmost importance when planning a corporate off-site event. “I’ve seen it so many times where someone plans an event and no one knows how to get there. It can really throw people off,” she says. “Make sure everyone has detailed instructions in advance.”


4 Questions to Ask When Planning a Company Holiday Party

88a1e9184b62fcf2_shutterstock_165467636.previewIt’s the second week of December and a thought just hit you like a ton of bricks: you forgot to plan your company holiday party. Don’t panic. You still have time (and could always organize a New Year’s party in January instead). Not sure where to start? Christina Millikin, founder of Glow Event Design in San Francisco, offers four questions to ask yourself as you dive into planning.

What’s the budget?

How much are you willing to spend on this event? Be specific. “Saying you want to ‘make it nice’ means different things to different people, so it is best to start with a set budget and move backwards from there,” recommends Millikin.

Once you have a number in mind, decide what party components are most important. If securing a specific venue is high on your list, spend a good portion of your allotment there. If team-building activities are important, allocate your funds differently.

Who will be invited?  

Will this party be for your sales department or for your whole staff? Will you be inviting significant others? If you’re worried about over-extending your budget by inviting husbands and wives, hold the party during work hours. “But if you are planning it for a weeknight or a weekend, it is best to allow people’s partners to come along,” she says. “All of us work hard and spend time away from our families. You don’t want to take your staff away for another evening.”

What activities will be offered?

Many of us have been to holiday parties at restaurants where the sole activity is to hang out at the bar. Think outside the box this year by tapping into the interests of your employees. “If you have staff members who love bowling, for example, consider hosting your party at a bowling alley,” says Millikin. “Or transform your office into a casino for a night and offer prizes.”

How will alcohol be handled?  

Access to alcohol can be a little tricky at company parties. On one hand, you may want to treat your employees to a few recreational drinks, but on the other hand, you don’t want things to get out of control. “We’ve all been to parties where someone drinks too much, makes a scene and the mood is awkard the next day,” she says. “It really pays to think in advance about the temperment of your employees and how they may handle alcohol.”

Opt to offer just beer and wine or an open bar for a limited peroid of time, or forgo drinking altogether with a lunchtime party, recommends Millikin. “And always offer non-alcoholic options so as not to isolate anyone,” she offers. “Come up with a really fun mocktail and offer it as part of the menu.” 


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 3 Ways to Keep Your Office Flu-Free This Winter

It’s that time of year—the time when hacking coughs, sneezes and nose-blowing ring through every small business. How can you keep your employees healthy (and productivity high) during cold and flu season? Here are three tips.

  1. Encourage sick employees to stay home. The benefits of having a sick employee come in to handle his or her work are far outweighed by the risk that the person will infect the rest of the staff. However, if employees feel penalized for staying home, they won’t do so. One study found that staying home just one day when sick reduces the chance of co-workers’ catching the flu by 25 percent; staying home two days cuts the risk by 40 percent. If employees are worried they’ll get overloaded with work while they’re out, try letting them work from home. At the same time, don’t require employees to work (even at home) if they truly need to rest.
  2. FluOffice_m_0926Keep it clean. Colds and flu spread in winter because people are more likely to spend time inside in an enclosed environment. Keep that environment as germ-free as you can by making sure your office is properly maintained. Keep disinfectant sprays on hand and regularly spray down door handles, break room surfaces, bathroom faucets and anything else that lots of people touch all day. If your staff shares tech tools like tablet computers, handheld bar-code scanners, desktop computers, cash registers or headsets, make sure you have the appropriate cleaners and cloths to disinfect these surfaces at the beginning of each shift or when people trade off their equipment. Also keep tissues and lots of hand sanitizer on hand—consider having some available in every room.
  3. Encourage healthy habits. Post signs in the restrooms and break room reminding employees to wash their hands with soap. Also post signs reminding employees to clean equipment that is shared. If your business offers health insurance that covers flu vaccines, encourage employees to get vaccinated. Since many people don’t want to make a special trip to the doctor’s to do this, see if your insurer offers any type of mobile vaccination clinic. Some medical providers will come out to businesses and provide flu shots for a fee. Even as a small business, you may be able to band with other local businesses to get this service or piggyback on a bigger company in your office building that is bringing in a flu shot clinic. 



 
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