Posts Tagged ‘Email’


How to Develop an Email Lead Nurturing Program

??????????????????????????????????????One of the biggest obstacles I’ve seen for small business owners is closing the sale. Now, I understand that we’re not all born salespeople, but even if you despise sales, you can’t get away from them if you run your own business. It’s just a matter of sorting through the leads you take in and nurturing them until they’re ready to buy. Email is a wonderful tool to help you do just that.

First, What Does Your Email Marketing Strategy Look Like?

If your answer to this question is “it’s nonexistent,” go back to square one and get started. You’d be amazed how quickly you can grow your email contact list simply by offering something of value, like a free report, whitepaper, or discount in exchange for web visitors’ email addresses.

But if you do have a way for people to join your list, what do you do with them once they’re there? Do you regularly send out email newsletters or promotions? If not, that’s where we’ll start.

Next, Segment Your Contacts

Understand that not everyone that signs up for your email list is in the same place in the buying cycle. Some people may simply be doing research to see what options are out there to solve their problems. Others may be specifically seeing what your brand offers and considering it against the competition. Still others may be ready to pull the trigger.

The more you can divide your email list into a few categories, the better you can target the content you deliver each group. And people who receive targeted content rather than across-the-board generic drivel are more likely to buy from you!

Once you’ve created a few “buckets” to separate your subscribers, write out a description of each person. It might look like this:

Problem Pete is looking for a solution to his problem: he needs a way to organize his photos online. He’s signed up for our free “10 Ways to Use Your Images Online” whitepaper, and now he’s more educated on the online photo storage space. Our emails to Pete need to address the benefits of using our service over the competition, as well as deliver additional educational content.

Having a buyer persona like this can help you build a strategy in the kinds of emails you send each segment. Knowing that Problem Pete is probably at the beginning of his solution-seeking journey means you can ply him with informative content that will not only educate him on your industry but also nudge him toward choosing your services.

Then, Build Out Your Content Strategy

Using the info you learned in building the buyer personas, you’ll now want to create an email marketing strategy for each segment and then build a content calendar around that strategy. Here’s an example:

  • Initial signup: automatically send the free report
  • Follow-up a week later: send our Top 10 blog post
  • Three days later: offer 20% off
  • If contact doesn’t use that offer, one week later, send personalized note from CEO

Each email, as you can see, delivers a different value, and there are enough of them coming at a steady cadence that your new subscribers can’t help but remember who your brand is.

You can schedule each of these as an autoresponder to automatically go out on the schedule you determine. Most email marketing software programs will do this for you (though if you use a free plan, you may have to upgrade).

Pay Attention to Results

Once you’ve got these autoresponders set up, don’t forget about them. Check in to measure your clickthrough rate (that’s what percent of your subscribers clicked links in the email to get to your site), your bounce rate (how many email addresses were incorrect or otherwise failed to get your emails), and your conversion rate (how many subscribers actually bought from you as a result of each email). Make changes as necessary to ensure your email lead efforts are fruitful.


Are You Getting Everything You Should Be Out of Google Apps?

If you’re like many small businesses, you might be using Gmail for your company email addresses. Or maybe you rely on Google Calendar to alert you about meetings and events from any mobile device. But those are just the tip of the iceberg for Google Apps. There are tons more features that help you collaborate with your team, work away from your desktop, and hold more productive meetings, both in person and virtual.

Build a Smarter Team

The great thing about Google products is they work so well together, as well as individually, especially for teams. While I’ve written about the best apps small business owners need to thrive, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Google Drive. When you’re collaborating on documents, sharing them in the cloud makes it easy for multiple people to access the documents and make their changes, without all that crossover of emails with different versions of that doc.You can create word processing documents, spreadsheets, forms, and presentations, and share them with anyone you want to have access to them.

And if your team isn’t in the office with you, Google Hangouts makes meetings easier. Up to 15 people can be on a call, and there are apps for mobile devices, so you’re not tethered to your desktop.

Google Calendar, too, is ideal when trying to schedule meetings for your team. You can share access of your calendar or see availability on others’ calendars, then send invites to your team. You can even include a video call in the invite (on Hangouts, of course!).

Taking it on the Go

There are compelling reasons for Google lovers to choose Android phones over Apple. They’re much more intuitive when it comes to using Google Apps, and many (like the Samsung S5) come standard with all of the apps built in. Sign in once and get access to your Hangouts, email, Drive, and calendar.

It’s the Little Things

Beyond these tools, there are plenty more. Like Google Vault, which helps you archive email and chats, making audits and legal research easy. Or Google Sites, a free tool with simple website templates. Groups let you channel your conversations into one place online, and Translate helps you understand foreign text.

Integrate What You’re Already Using

A little-known feature of Google Apps is its Marketplace (I myself didn’t even know about it until I did some digging). The apps here are from software and programs you’re likely already using, like CRM, workflow, and email marketing. Enabling your accounts to work within Google Apps streamlines the activity between the two.

For example, the Nimble app in the Marketplace gives Nimble users more functionality. It allows you to import contacts from your social stream with one click; link emails, tweets, tasks, and events to a profile; and allow your team to log into Nimble using their Google account.

You might even discover new tools, like the HelloFax app, which lets you fax documents from your Drive. Or QuoteRoller, which helps you build out quotes and proposals.

All This…at What Cost?

If you signed up for Google in 2012 or earlier, you’ve been grandfathered in to free services. But at only $50 a year (or $120 with unlimited storage and Vault), it remains an affordable option for any small business looking for easy productivity tools.

We’ve come to rely heavily on Google, and for good reason: the brand keeps providing useful tools that help us do more with our businesses.

google_apps6464


How to Prevent Hacking of Your Email

??????????????????????????Security is one of the biggest issues facing small businesses. With BYOD policies (Bring Your Own Device), many small businesses make easy targets for hacks that can literally cause havoc in their company. This is the result of having less sophisticated security that larger companies employ to protect themselves.

Many security breaches occur through email since they are a lot like postcards that travel over the internet. They are addressed to a person, but anyone can turn them over and read them. This is a major problem since emails often contain customer sensitive information.

When small businesses share information with their clients via email, they are liable for protecting that data. If a client sends their credit card information and someone intercepts that email, it can be used fraudulently. Not only does it reflect very poorly on the business, they may be liable

Here are a few steps small business owners should take to protect their email communication:

  1. Do not share passwords or accounts.  A lot of small businesses have a general account for communicating with customers that several people have access to. The problem is that every person can now access every message. Action to take: Increase the security of email communications by using person-specific accounts and not sharing passwords. Remember, a general account can automatically forward email to many person specific accounts if information always needs to be shared.
  2. Prevent physical access.. Leaving a computer open and unattended makes it incredibly easy for someone to walk up and read emails. Action to take: Make sure that all devices lock after not being used for 15 seconds and require a password to logon.
  3. Encrypt emails. Email encryption services, such as Enlocked, give an easy way to secure messages, allowing them to be sent safely over standard email. The service works right within an email environment. Action to take. Draft an email and address it to a user just like normal except next to the send standard button is a “send secure” button. The recipient receives the message normally, but must authenticate themselves before viewing.
  4. Use different channels. A common method for sending sensitive information, such as usernames and passwords, is send them in separate emails. Action to take: Use two separate channels; send the username via email and the password via text message. Another popular method of protection is sending password protected files. It works as a great first step, but the sender still runs into the problem of safely communicating password information.

If protecting email communications is not seen as problem in your company, you haven’t had the problem. Take the necessary steps to protect sensitive information and evaluate what works best for your small business.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How to Get Control of Your Email

Is your email out of control? Are you constantly checking it on three different devices and feel like you never get out from under the avalanche? If your emails seem to be multiplying like rabbits, don’t despair—there are ways to get a grip and get back control of your life. Not all of the following tactics will work for everyone—but some should work for you.

  • Avoid checking email first thing in the morning. If you find that email sucks up your time and keeps you from accomplishing big projects, try designating the first hour of your day as email-free. Just be sure you use that time to work on key tasks that are crucial to your business—not busywork or checking Facebook. By dedicating a solid hour a day to focused effort, you’ll be amazed how much more you get done. (Disclosure: I offer this advice because so many time management people put it on their lists of must-do’s. Personally, I always check email first thing in the morning. To do otherwise seems counter-productive to me.)
  • Turn off email notifications. If your computer or smartphone dings every time you get a new email, no wonder you’re going nuts. Turn off notifications so you can focus instead of being interrupted every two seconds.
  • Set times for checking email. It’s human nature to seek out the new and exciting. When we’re bored or stressed, it’s natural to check our email to see if anything more interesting has come along. You’ll get more done if you set a few specific times of day for checking email—for example, one hour into your day, right before lunch, early afternoon and near the end of the day. If you let your team know about your email habits, they won’t panic when you don’t respond immediately.
  • Use filters, folders, rules and other tools. Whether you use Gmail, Outlook, Apple Mail or other program, investigate the tools available on your email program to help manage email. Spending a few hours now learning how to automatically sort emails into folders, set rules for what to do with emails and using filters to ensure you don’t miss important emails (and don’t waste time on pointless ones) will save you hours each day in the end.
  • Automate and delegate. If you frequently answer the same types of emails, such as a certain kind of customer inquiry, creating templates with stock language you can edit quickly will save you time. Or delegate these standard replies to an assistant (real or virtual).
  • Pick up the phone. Sometimes we spend hours going back and forth on email when a simple phone call would solve the issue in a flash. Never minimize the value of in-person communication.

Stocksy_txp7269e7953I8000_Small_221240


How Can Voicemail-to-Email Make Your Life Easier?

Paul Kida has been a member of the Nextiva Support Team since 2010 and now serves as the Onboarding Team Manager.

Voicemail is a very common way for a customer or client to provide you with detailed information about questions, concerns or projects. With so many different things going on in the work place day-to-day, it is expected that at least a few calls might end up in your voicemail box. 

When listening to a voicemail from the phone, it is often easy to miss a phone number or not clearly understand an important part of the message. And starting the entire message over just isn’t an efficient way to work. When using the voicemail-to-email feature, incoming messages are sent to your email where you can open the audio file and listen to it on your computer – a feature that saves time and increases your ability to work remotely.

When listening to a voicemail on a deskphone, you may be required to listen the entire message over again just to catch every important detail.  If there are account numbers, phone numbers, addresses, or other detailed information being left in the voicemail, you may need to listen to the entire voicemail multiple times in order to catch everything. Listening to your voicemails on your computer gives you a time saving advantage, because you can easily rewind to certain parts of the message in case you missed a detail. 

Voicemail-to-email can also help you organize how you will address the voicemail you just received. Certain email programs will let you set up flags and reminders that will ensure you don’t let certain high priority messages fall through the cracks. 

And, you have the ability to control the archived messages on your computer so you won't have to worry about a new message pushing an old message out. This way you don’t have to worry about accidentally deleting important information.

Check out the voicemail-to-email feature with any of the Nextiva Office plans. This feature can be set up within minutes on your phone system.

 


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How to Start a Customer E-Newsletter

customer-experience-digitalDo you want to remind customers of your business, encourage them to interact with you and provide useful information to help make their lives better? You can accomplish all of these goals and more with a customer e-newsletter.

Starting an e-newsletter for your customers may sound intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. There are many email marketing services that provide design templates you can use to create your newsletter, send it out for you, and provide tools and analytics you can use to measure results. Plus, email marketing services stay up-to-date on the latest laws regarding email marketing and spam, which can help ensure your business isn’t running afoul of FTC regulations.

Your e-newsletter should contain a mix of useful information to help your customers and special offers from your business. You don’t want it to be solely promotional, but you also want it to inspire customers to click through to your website, visit your store or otherwise engage with your business. For instance, if you own an ecommerce site that sells gardening supplies, you could send a monthly email newsletter with do-it-yourself tips on gardening activities like preparing your yard for winter, along with timely offers such as discounts on seasonal supplies. Also be sure to include links to your social media accounts so customers can follow you on social media.

How often should you send an email newsletter? The key is regularity—if your schedule is sporadic, customers may think you’ve gone out of business or are not professional. A monthly newsletter is a good starting point for most small businesses. If that’s too much, consider starting quarterly, or if you have more bandwidth, try biweekly or weekly. Monitor your readers’ unsubscribes to make sure you’re not sending too often.

Once you’ve got your email newsletter going, be sure to promote it everywhere you can with links to sign up on the home page of your website, in your marketing materials, on your social media accounts and at the end of your email signature. 


8 Rules of Business Email Etiquette

email-integration-2Most of us send dozens of emails per day, some of them for personal reasons, others for professional purposes. As Rachel Wagner, certified corporate etiquette consultant, trainer and speaker, explains, there are a few important rules to live by, especially when sending a business email.

Rule #1: Always be professional

“A business email should reflect the same style as a business letter with a greeting and a closing,” she says.

Even if the message is part of a long email string, it is good to keep a professional tone, regardless of how casual the other exchanges may be.

Rule #2: Make it brief

No one likes to read a novel of an email. To keep your reader’s attention, make your email short and to the point.

“Keep your paragraphs between two and four sentences and focus on putting your points in bullets or numbering them,” Wagner suggests. “This will make things much easier to read on a screen on smart phone.”

Rule #3: Be careful when replying

Most of us feel that we get too much email in the span of a workday. Lessen the pain for others by being selective with the “reply to all” button. Only use it when necessary, Wagner recommends. Send the email to the person it is intended for, not the whole office.

Rule #4: Re-read before sending

It can be incredibly easy to send an email quickly only to go back later and realize that your grammar was incorrect or that you misspelled a few words. Avoid these mistakes by taking a few minutes to re-read your email before sending it out, she advises.

Rule #5: Respond in a timely manner

“Try to respond in no more than 24 hours—its common courtesy,” Wagner says. “If you can’t respond fully, just write a short note saying that you are working on the request and will get back to them at a specified time.”

Rule #6: Don’t forget to attach documents

If you plan to attach a document, do it as soon as you refer to the document in the email. So often people forget to attach even when they indicate an attachment, Wagner says. It pays to attach right away so you don’t have to send a second email.

Rule #7: Avoid angry emailing

“We’ve all gotten emails that have made us bristle,” she says. “I recommend writing a response and then sitting on it for several hours, even overnight before sending. Put it in your draft box, re-read it and make sure it doesn’t sound too abrasive before sending.”

Rule #8: Know when not to send an email

When dealing with sensitive, even confidential information, consider alternatives to email such as in-person meetings and phone calls.

“Not everything should be done over email,” Wagner says. “Remember that email is not private, it can be sent to other people. So if you have a lengthy message to send or something you think may be misconstrued in writing, try an alternative mode of communication to get your point across.” 




 
Nextiva Logo

phone-icon(800) 799-0600 Sales phone-icon(800) 285-7995 Support
Nextiva is the leader in Business VoIP Services. Copyright 2014 Nextiva, All Rights Reserved,
Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy, Patents, Sitemap