Posts Tagged ‘Customer service’


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Recovering From a Customer Service Slip

12-16 customer service mistake smallHow your small business recovers from a customer service slipup is one of the most important aspects of good customer service. Why? Because one bad customer service experience runs the risk of running your good reputation—even with loyal customers.

Let me share an example. This holiday shopping season, I seem to be encountering an unusually high number of shipping problems with my online shopping. Recently, I realized that one of the online retailers I normally rely on hadn’t shipped an order placed more than a week ago. This made me nervous: In the past, everything I’ve ordered from them has shipped within two days.

Despite years of history with this retailer, and their standout performance all the rest of the time with something like 20 orders a year, I was so annoyed that immediately, their sterling reputation with me was in jeopardy. Here’s what happened next—and what they did (and didn’t) do right.

I contacted the retailer to find out what was going on.

Wrong: Their customer service contact information was difficult to find. I wanted to talk to—or at least email or chat online with—a live person. For a while, I was panicked that this was one of those sites where that was impossible.

Right: When I did find the contact info, I was pleased the company offered email, phone and chat customer service. You should always offer the widest possible number of options for people to contact you; not every customer is the same. I picked chat.

I started a chat with the company.

Right: I immediately got a response, as well as a notification that there might be longer than normal wait times due to high volume. I understood; it’s the holidays. Always let customers know what to expect—it eases their stress, and eliminates unnecessary anger in dealing with you.

During the chat I got distracted multitasking and stopped responding to the customer service rep. (That was a goof on my part!)

Right: She politely asked me several times if I was still there, then politely told me she would need to end the chat since I hadn’t responded for 10 minutes.

Mortified, I started a new chat, copying the text of the old chat into the window and apologizing for dropping the ball.

Right: The next customer service rep smoothly picked up where the previous one had left off. Realizing I was a flake, he asked me if I could stay on the chat for three minutes.

Right: He told me there was a problem with my order that was keeping it from shipping. He fixed the problem and sent me a detailed status report of my order with the new delivery time.

Wrong: I should have received notification that my order was “stuck” in the system. What if I hadn’t remembered the order until it was too late to get it in time? Develop systems for your business ensures this type of error doesn’t happen. Depending on the size and nature of your business, you can set up automated systems, or use simple manual systems like a checklist employees must go over before shipping an order.

Right: To make up for the delay, the customer service rep gave me next-day shipping for free. I was already pretty happy that the problem was solved, but this “something extra” made me fall in love with the company all over again. Always recognize when you have caused a customer to feel stressed, and take steps to not only fix it, but make up for it.

How do you handle customer service slipups in your business? 


Yes, The Customer Is Wrong Sometimes. However…

Is the customer always right?

For whatever reason, I'm asked this question more than any other. Doesn’t matter the forum, or the context: In interviews, keynote speeches, training sessions, seminars, workshops–it always comes up.

So, here's my definitive answer.

No. The customer isnt always right. But you want to make her feel like she is.

Stocksy_txp24de892bFK9000_Small_315517"Right" and "wrong," even in situations much more crucial than a mere customer service misunderstanding, are hard to sort out. Think of the sworn – but completely misremembered – eyewitness testimony that has convicted so many innocent men and women.

So in working with customers, your goal needs to be the polar opposite of trying to play Sherlock Holmes, by and large*.  It's not your goal to make it clear to the customer how inaccurate their position is.  Instead, focus on putting yourself in your customer's shoes, their eyes in your sockets, until you understand why they feel, and in fact “are,” "right.”  And make them feel good about it.

She’s your customer, after all.

*Are there exceptions? Absolutely.  Including safety and health-related scenarios, where sorting out the facts matters more than anything else. And expensive, ongoing B2B situations where there are disagreements on details of contracts that truly need to be resolved in a factual manner.  Though even in such situations, there likely are gracious ways to demonstrate your factual correctness without proving the other party baldly "wrong.”

 


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Do Social Media and Customer Service Mix?

12-8 Social Media Customer Support smallA few years back there was a flurry of interest in using social media as a customer service tool. Reports in the media of big companies ignoring customer complaints on Facebook and Twitter—then facing backlash—led businesses to worry so much about their online reputations that some companies started moving their customer service to social media. 

But using social media as a customer service tool has some key weaknesses you should know about. First, while customers do want to feel their venting on social media is heard by the business in question, the vast majority does not want to use social media as a customer service forum.

According to an American Express survey on customer service expectations released earlier this year, just 23 percent of respondents have ever used social media for customer service purposes. However, the majority of those customers used social media to praise a business for good customer service, while half used it to express frustration for poor service, and nearly half simply wanted to spread the word about the business on social media. Relatively few used social media to reach out to the business in search of a response or to deal with a specific problem.

Overwhelmingly, talking to a live person on the phone is still the way most consumers want to resolve customer service issues, especially complex ones. In fact, 48 percent of those surveyed want to deal with customer service problems by phone; only 3 percent want to do so on social media.

So what does this mean if you’ve launched a social media customer service effort? Don’t drop it completely and start ignoring customer complaints or questions on social platforms. No matter what your customers are posting there, it’s important to be responsive. But don’t put all of your customer service support into social media. Make sure you have a website that can answer customers’ basic questions and problems, and sufficient phone support to deal with more complicated issues. That’s what customers want—and isn’t giving customers what they want Rule No. 1 of customer service? 


What Should I Give Away When A Customer’s Unhappy?

One of the most common and emotionally fraught questions I encounter is this: "How should I compensate a customer for a service or product failure?

No matter how superb your product or service is, everyone in business eventually needs to find the answer to this question.  And the answer to the question is this: It depends. Customers have diverse values and preferences, varying even from day to day as well as from customer to customer—so your employees working with disgruntled customers need to be given enormous discretion.

Still: There are principles that almost always apply:

  1. Most customers understand that things can and will go wrong. What they don't  understand, accept, or find interesting are excuses. For example, they don’t care about your org chart: Your mentioning that a problem originated in a different department is of no interest to them.
  2. Don’t panic. With most customers and in most situations, customers’ sense of trust and camaraderie increases after a problem is successfully resolved, compared to if you had never had the problem in the first place. This make sense, since you now have a shared experience: You have solved something by working closely together.
  3. Avoid assuming you know what solution a customer wants or ‘‘should’’ want. Ask. And if a customer makes a request that sounds extreme or absurd, don’t rush to dismiss it. Even if it seems on its face impossible, there may be a creative way to make the requested solution, or something a lot like it, happen.
  4. Dont strive for ‘‘fairness’’ or ‘‘justice.’’  Creating, or preserving, a customer’s warm feelings for a company isn't about fairness or justice. It's about being treated especially well.
  5. Learn from customer issues, but dont use them as an opportunity to discipline or train your staff in front of your customer. This may sound obvious, but it happens quite often. Watch out for this flaw, especially when you’re under stress.
  6. Dont imagine youre doing something special for a customer by making things how they should have been in the first place. Time cannot be given back—it’s gone. The chance to get it right the first time? It’s gone. So re-creating how things should have been is just a first step. You need to then give the customer something extra. If you aren’t sure which ‘‘extra’’ to offer a particular customer, just make it clear you want to offer something. If the customer doesn’t like red lollipops or doesn’t eat sugar, she’ll let you know. Then you can decide together on a different treat.
  7. …And always, always, keep an eye on the lifetime value–directly and as a vocal supporter–of having a loyal, engaged customer. A loyal customer is likely worth a small fortune to your company when considered over a decade or two of regular purchases, not to mention that customer's "network value"–the value of her or his recommendations online and off.

Perhaps in your business this number is a few thousand dollars, or perhaps it's hundreds of thousands. It's well worth figuring out that number and keeping it in mind if you ever feel that temptation to quarrel with a customer over, say, an overnight shipping bill.

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Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Why the Holidays are a Great Time to Call Your Customers

12-2 making a phone call smallWhen you think about the holiday season, you probably think about family, fun and feasting. But did you ever stop to think that the holidays are also a great time to reach out and call your small business customers?

There are several reasons why now is an ideal time to contact customers by phone.

  • The holiday season is a time for celebrating relationships, and talking in person can help reinforce and cement your business relationships.
  • With many businesses short-staffed during the holidays, decision-makers who normally don’t answer the phone may be a lot easier to reach.
  • While rank-and-file workers typically take time off, C-level execs are more likely to be working, frequently coming in early or staying late to take advantage of the quiet office and uninterrupted time to focus.
  • At many companies, budgets need to be spent before the year ends, so there might be money available for projects you might normally have trouble selling.
  • Other companies are planning their budgets for next year, making now a good time to get on their radar.

So how can you make your “reach out and touch” customer calls successful? Try these four tips:

  1. Make a list. Use your CRM system or other customer data to identify potentially most lucrative customers. For example, you might check who purchased from you this time last year or whose fiscal year is about to end.
  2. Set a goal. Calling is a numbers game, so it’s important not to get discouraged. Set a goal to call a certain number of customers per day, and just power through.
  3. Be prepared. Know what you’re going to say in advance so you don’t waste the customer’s time. Yes, small talk greases the wheels, especially this time of year, but people are also busy.
  4. It’s not all about the sale. These calls aren’t focused on making an immediate sale (though that would be nice), but on enhancing your relationship with the customer and finding new ways to serve him or her. Explore their needs for the coming year, what they’d like to do differently and how you can help them achieve their 2015 goals. Ending up with a firm commitment to talk in 2015 is a good start.

Mondays with Mike: Why A One-Star Review Can Be Good For Your Business

Yelp ReviewsIn the olden days, you might have had to pick up a phone book or ask a neighbor if you wanted a recommendation for a business – whether it was a restaurant in an unfamiliar city or a contractor to fix something around your house.  Now, though, it’s possible to find reviews of nearly any business online.  That means consumers have access to more information than ever before about your company and the quality of service it provides.  That’s a great thing!

But bad reviews are inevitable.  What do you do when you see a lousy review about your company?  How you handle customer complaints is critical in terms of managing the public perception of your business, and what you do depends on what sort of review you’ve been given. 

There are basically two types of bad reviews:  ones that are unjustified, either from jealous competitors or from customers without legitimate gripes who would have been impossible to please, and then there are the legitimate complaints.  How you react is different for each instance. 

Say you’re a roofing contractor, and you periodically check out your reviews online (which EVERY business should be doing.)  You discover that one of the recent reviews complains of costs going over budget and construction deadlines missed – things you absolutely know aren’t true.  It could be that your competition is making up stories to win business away from you.  It could be that a customer mixed up the name of your business and posted a review for the wrong company. 

Whatever the case, though, you must address the complaint.  Since the review is posted publicly, I suggest replying to the review and asking the customer to get in contact with you so you can resolve the problem.  If time passes and there’s no response, then publicly state that you don’t see a record of the transaction, and you can only conclude that an honest mistake was made in posting the review. 

Your goal in addressing unjustified reviews should be to convey to prospective customers that you’re a reasonable, honest, and conscientious business owner, and you take criticism seriously.

Likewise, if you see a legitimate complaint – that your restaurant gave slow service on a particular Friday night – then you should step up publicly and apologize for any inconvenience and offer some way to make it up to the customer if you feel it’s appropriate.  If prospective diners see that you offered to buy a round of drinks to make up for the fact that you were short staffed, they’re going to understand that you’re serious about customer satisfaction.  Apologize when appropriate and make it right.

A lousy review is not the end of the world.  Every thriving business has them.  The good news is consumers are increasingly savvy about review analysis.  They look for authentic reviews – which won’t all be positive – and they look to see how business owners react when they’re criticized.  Flipping out, accusing customers of being unreasonable, or making excuses for less-than-ideal customer service is NOT the way to respond to criticism.  Be deliberate.  Be fair, and above all, be vigilant about responding.   


The Danger Of DYPII (Did You Plug It In?)

In pulling off a successful service recovery (the times when a customer contacts you to complain about your service or product, or needs your help in addressing a service-related breakdown) one factor that underlies your ultimate success or failure is the language at you use.  For this reason, service-recovery language needs to be chosen intentionally in your business, ideally codified and immortalized in a “language lexicon” that all can refer to.

The language of calming, apology, and probing

You’ll never successfully calm an upset customer without the right words and phrasing. ‘‘I’m sorry, I apologize’’ are the words, delivered sincerely, that your customer wants to hear. Phrases like ‘‘It’s our policy’’ and any synonyms for ‘‘You’re wrong’’ must be banished. (If, in fact, the customer is wrong and there is a bona fide – e.g., safety-related or legally required – reason to point this out, you need words that express this obliquely, such as ‘‘Our records seem to indicate…’’ and ‘‘Perhaps… ’’ so that she can realize her error but also save face.

The five words you can never say to a customer: "Did You Plug It In?"

?????????????????????????There is a specific moment in service recovery where the language used (and the timing of when you use that language) comes most crucially into play.  When a customer is looking to resolve an issue, you are often put in an exploratory position that requires you to ask rudimentary questions like:‘‘Are you sure you, uh, typed in your password correctly?’’

I refer to these as DYPII (‘‘Did You Plug It In?’’) questions. DYPII questions (pronounced “dippy”), no matter how justified, are highly likely to raise customer hackles. If you bring up DYPII questions right away, before you’ve taken the time to sincerely apologize to the customer for a service breakdown—and before your customer has accepted your apology—they’ll almost universally be considered offensive.

But after you’ve apologized, and taken the time to help your customer develop a spirit of collaboration with you, the same questions are generally tolerated well, if you use the correct language.

Every industry has its own, often predictable, set of “DYPII” questions. Plan for them. Find new phrases to use. It makes all the difference.

In fact, the classically infuriating DYPII question, ‘‘Did you plug it in?’’ can be rendered as ‘‘Maybe the wall connection is loose. Can you do me a favor and check where it plugs into the socket?’’


Improving Customer Service? Try These 4 Tech Tools

11-21 tech customer service toolsCustomer service can make or break a business, especially in an era of online reviews and social media. One post about a bad experience with your company can linger online for years, scaring away business and harming the professional reputation you’ve worked so hard to build.

But technology can help businesses, too. A wide variety of tools are available to help businesses manage their customer service, automating processes to prevent calls from falling through the cracks. Here are four tools that can put your business in control of all of its interactions with customers.

Ticketing System

Whether a business is handling an occasional call for assistance or hundreds of support requests each day, a ticketing system can help bring it all together. Each call that comes in creates a new ticket that remains open until the issue is resolved to the customer’s satisfaction. The call is routed to the right support representative and escalated as necessary, with each employee logging notes as they work to help the customer. By regularly extracting reports on tickets, a business can pinpoint trends, including specific issues with a product or service, giving it the opportunity to fix those issues.

Live Chat

As your business grows, your website will receive multiple visits each day from customers interested in learning more about your product. The ability to initiate a chat to ask questions can make a big difference to both new visitors and current customers, some of whom feel more comfortable chatting through an online interface than picking up the phone to call. This technology has evolved even further in recent years to allow businesses to initiate a chat with every guest who visits. As a user clicks around your site, an invitation to chat (usually phrased as “How may I help you today?”) can be sent, with the customer opting to either close it or engage in a conversation.

Virtual Call Center

Cloud technology allows businesses to set up an affordable customer service desk online. Representatives no longer have to drive into an office each day to gather in clusters of cubicles. With a virtual call center, each customer service representatives can login from any internet-connected device to begin accepting calls, freeing up businesses to hire employees to work from home. With reporting and call management features, virtual call centers also provide ongoing insight into call volume trends for resource planning purposes.

Google Alerts

When a customer has an issue with a product or service your business provides, he can easily blast it across the internet before you’re even aware of it. By setting up Google Alerts for any mention of your brand, you’ll know immediately when you’ve been mentioned on social media or online review sites, giving you the opportunity to engage in damage control before the problem spirals out of control.

Quality customer service is essential to a business’s ongoing success. Thanks to technology, it’s easier than ever to implement and manage high-quality customer service desks. With many of these features coming with built-in reporting tools, you’ll have insight into your customers that will help drive future business decisions, improving your efficiency and keeping you in better contact with the consumers you’re serving.


Everyone In Your Company Needs To Be Responsible For Complaints

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Here’s an important question to ask yourself: Whom do you feel should be responsible for the customer experience at your company?

How you (and others in your organization) answer this question can make or break your company.

Here's my answer.

Make everyone responsible for the customer experience.  Responsible for handling complaints. For suggesting improvements in your processes. For maintaining the customer-friendly processes you already have. If you don't,  you'll find the actual responsibility for the customer experience at your company devolves quickly "no one."

This answer isn't as pie-in-the-sky as it sounds. "Everyone" here is shorthand for “everyone, to the extent of their abilities, to the extent of their trainability and to the extent they interact with customers.”

The picture of customer service we need to get out of our heads — and out of our businesses — is the old, compartmentalized version: an isolated clerk on an upper floor of a venerable department store, where customers have to schlep their returns to get an adjustment.

Instead, teach Joan in Sales and Jeff in Shipping how they themselves can initiate a service recovery. Jeff may not be the right person ultimately to fix the problem, but if he encounters an unsatisfied customer, he needs to know how to do more than say ‘‘I can’t help you, I just send boxes.’’

Even Dale, who cleans the toilets, should be empowered beyond helpless reactions like ‘‘Um, you’d need to ask a manager about that.’’ Customers hate to hear ‘‘You need to ask a manager.’’

Dale will feel better about himself and your company, his customer will feel better about herself and your company, and service problems will tend to turn out better if Dale has been trained to express confident enthusiasm: ‘‘Certainly, I am so sorry. I will help you with that,’’ followed by finding the right person to solve the problem (even if that does happen to be, in fact, a manager).




 
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