Posts Tagged ‘Customer service’


Work Your Biz Wednesday: Best Practices for Text Marketing Campaigns

Have you thought about using text marketing for your small business? Here are some tips for a successful campaign from The Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: The Truth About Negative Online Reviews

?????????????????????????????Are you in denial about negative online reviews of your business? I know plenty of small business owners who don’t list their companies on review sites like Yelp! Others are listed, but never bother to check their listing to see what kinds of reviews their businesses are getting.

While I can understand the impulse to hide your head in the sand when it comes to online reviews, here are four reasons why playing ostrich isn’t a good thing.

  1. Your potential customers are reading online reviews, so you should be, too. A whopping 79 percent of U.S. adult Internet users check online reviews sometimes or always before they buy something, a survey by YouGov reports. Just 7 percent never do. Online reviews have become essential to both online and offline shoppers, so if you aren’t checking them, you’re in the dark about how customers view your business.
  2. The reality probably isn’t as bad as you fear it is. Yes, we’ve all heard horror stories about bad reviews going viral. However, the YouGov survey says Internet users are far more likely to post good or mixed reviews than negative ones. Just 21 percent say they’ve ever left a bad review, compared to 54 percent who have left a good one and 59 percent who have left a mixed one.
  3. Even the negative reviewers aren’t out to get you. Tales of vengeful competitors posting bad reviews of small businesses get a lot of attention in the media. In reality, though, 88 percent of reviewers who write bad reviews do so to prevent other customers from having a bad experience, not out of vengeance. About one-fourth leave bad reviews to help get over their anger, while 21 percent do so hoping the business will take steps to remedy the problem they’re complaining about.
  4. Which leads to the fourth and most important reason not to ignore negative reviews: Bad reviews are a valuable tool for growing your business. Negative reviews show you what you’re doing wrong (or what the customer perceives as wrong, which is pretty much the same thing). They offer a chance to make it right and then share what you’ve done with the world. If you can convince an unsatisfied customer you care about their experience and you’ve got their best interests at heart, you just might earn a customer for life—one who will evangelize your business to their friends, family and online connections.

Did you ever think so many positive things could come out of one negative online review?


Work Your Biz Wednesday: How to Leverage a Daily Deal Promotion

In this week's Work Your Biz Wednesday video, Small Biz Lady Melinda Emerson gives you tips on leveraging a daily deal promotion through companies like Groupon and LivingSocial.


Work Your Biz Wednesday: How to Provide Outstanding Customer Service

The real secret to keeping customers coming back is to deliver great customer service. Find out how to deliver the "wow" from Small Biz Lady, Melinda Emerson:


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Is Your Business Senior-Friendly?

Stocksy_txp2258803bJk3000_Small_80398You may think your small business is doing a great job of providing amazing customer service. But if your customer experience isn’t in line with what senior shoppers want and need, you could be leaving money on the table. And since the latest Global Aging Report from Nielsen projects that by 2050, nearly one in five people will be 60 or older, that could be a lot of cash!

Seniors often have more money to spend and more time to spend it than younger consumers. Here are some things seniors care about that you should consider when creating a senior-friendly customer experience:

  • Print size. Half the seniors surveyed struggle to read package labels. Make sure your in-store signage, menus or marketing materials are legible for older readers. In general, a minimum of 12-point type is best. Avoid reverse-out type (light type on a black background), as this is harder to read.
  • Good lighting. Is lighting in your store, office or restaurant adequate for older shoppers? If they can’t read your menu without getting a headache or worry about tripping and falling in a dimly lighted store, they may avoid your business altogether. 
  • Noise. As we age, background noise can drown out normal conversation. Make sure your location is conversation-friendly by using window coverings, carpet and décor to cover hard surfaces and muffle noise. Keep background music to a level that doesn’t make hearing difficult or offer to seat older customers away from speakers.
  • Physical comfort. Wide aisles, handicapped-accessible restrooms and seating that can accommodate walkers or wheelchairs make a difference in whether older customers visit your location. About one-fourth of older customers in Nielsen’s survey complain that retailers don’t have enough places to sit down and rest, handicapped parking, handicapped bathrooms or wheelchair-accessible ramps.
  • Personal assistance. Older customers may need help with heavy packages or bags. They are also more likely to want personal advice before making a purchase, rather than using a smartphone to go online to look up product information as younger customers tend to do. Be sure your employees are sensitive to older shoppers’ needs.
  • Senior-friendly websites. Older customers do go online, but typically on their desktop computers. Make sure your site is senior-friendly by keeping it simple and readable. Use plenty of white space, easy-to-read fonts and colors, and clear navigation. You can even provide options for enlarging type in case users don’t know how to do that in their browsers. Finally, provide various options for seniors to contact your customer service department—they may prefer to speak to someone on the phone rather than use chat or email. 

Work Your Biz Wednesday: 6 Reasons Why You Should Contact Your Customers

The most valuable thing in any business is your existing customers. Here are 6 reasons why you should contact them from Melinda Emerson, the Small Biz Lady.


Mondays with Mike: Boost Your Revenue with Recurring Fees

While some of us derive great satisfaction from the role our business plays in the community, the services we offer our clients, and the rewards of having built a successful business from scratch, we’re all – at the end of the day – concerned about growing our company’s revenue.   In order to keep the lights on and pay the staff, we have to bring in money, and it seems like we need a little more if it each year.   One of the most effective methods I’ve found for managing and increasing revenue is by converting customers to a recurring fee plan. 

Here’s how it works:

Say you’re in the office equipment repair business.  Your average visit costs $200, and you visit each of your customers an average of twice per year, for a total of about $400 annual revenue per client per year.  If you were to offer an annual service plan, billed at $40 per month, you would be providing a solution that benefits both your company and your clients.  You give your clients predictable expenses, alleviating the stress of funding the entire cost of a repair all at once.  You get the benefit of predictable revenue.  You can count on the monthly payment and bridge the gap that slow months can create, and at the end of the year, you’ve brought in $480 per client, increasing your overall revenue. 

Makes sense, right?  Now here’s why it works:

In addition to establishing consistent expenses and income, there’s another key benefit.  Once you’re no longer billing for the service itself, you have new motivation to operate as efficiently as possible.  Your new goal won’t be increasing billable hours, but will be doing every job quickly and properly.  You know that poor quality work will end up costing you more in the long run, so you provide the best service possible the first time.

Stocksy_txpd093e56ePf2000_Small_27507Skeptical about your customers’ willingness to commit to a contract?  Think about gym memberships.  Millions of people pay $29 monthly for a gym membership they seldom use.  They sign up (usually in January,) go regularly for a little while, and by the time they stop using the gym, they’re so used to the monthly debit that they don’t even notice it.  Sure, some members will cancel, but others will not.  Once your clients are used to the monthly premium, they will cease to think about it.  You’ve gotten them accustomed to a steady-as-she-goes expense that lands in your bank account each month.

Think that your business won’t support a recurring fee structure?   Think again!  Nearly every business has an aspect that can be transformed into a regular fee cycle.  If you own a candy shop, you can sell monthly subscriptions with seasonal offerings available exclusively to your subscribers.  They get special treats, and you get regular revenue.  Own a bookstore?  Offer an annual reader rewards card with a modest fee that entitles customers to exclusive events and special discounts.  Challenging yourself to find ways to reward customers for committing to you in the form of a recurring fee can – if managed properly – yield both steady income and consumer loyalty: a magical combination.


Mondays with Mike: Appeal to Customers with your Authenticity

A couple of years ago I was scheduled to attend an accounting seminar, and I was dreading it every bit as much as you’d expect.  Making numbers interesting ain’t easy, and my experience is that accountants typically aren’t the most lively public speakers.  I arrived at the seminar, armed myself with about a gallon of coffee, and settled in to see if maybe, just maybe, the guy running the show might actually keep me awake.

It was just as awful as I’d feared.  Not only did the accountant show up in a suit that looked like a 1980s KGB castoff, but he also sported a world-class monotone.  He looked like a robot facing the room as he methodically slogged through the agenda.  I found some toothpicks, propped my eyelids open, and I managed to stay alert enough to realize that the information he presented was actually really useful.  As the robot accountant finished up the seminar, I jotted down his name and made a note to NEVER attend another of his meetings.  Even though the guy was smart, he could put a hyperactive Chihuahua to sleep.

Fast forward a couple of weeks.  I attended a party at a friend’s house, and I was headed out back to help with the grill when I saw him.  The robot accountant was at the party.  Panicked, I fled to the bathroom to avoid another snooze fest.  Eventually, however, I had to get back out to the party, and – as you might imagine – there he was.  I was trapped, and of course he recognized me.

Even before we started to talk, though, I realized that he was dressed casually and seemed much more relaxed than he had in the seminar.  He thanked me for having attended, and we made a little small talk.  I was surprised to discover that he was actually really funny, and we were laughing about a joke he’d made when he said something that floored me and inspired this article.  He said, “I hate having to be all professional at work.  I wish I could make money just by being myself.”

Wow.

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I took two important things away from that party.  First, Mr. Robot is now my accountant – the very best one I’ve ever had.  Second, I realized the disservice we do ourselves when we conceal our a

uthentic personalities from our customers to try to achieve some “professional” demeanor.  Now, I’m not advocating littering your next presentation with f-bombs, but when we act rigid and formal, we’re hiding who we really are and missing an opportunity to connect with clients in a more meaningful way.

I’m reminded of Dr. Seuss, who wrote some lines that we should keep in mind when we’re deciding whether to be a robot professional or ourselves for our next meeting.  He said, “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.”  The fact is that not all clients are a perfect fit for you.  Now it’s possible for you to put on a faux persona and woo them, but then you’ve landed a customer for whom you’re going to continually have to put on a show.  Far better to find the clients who actually like the way you work naturally than to spin your wheels chasing customers who aren’t a great fit for you.

Authenticity creates trust, and being yourself lets you connect with the clients for whom you’re a natural fit.  Resist the temptation to act like a robot professional, and you’ll not only be happier, but you’ll also be more successful.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Give Your Customer Service a Checkup

Is your customer service up to par? Even if your business starts off with stellar service, it’s easy for your standards to slip as your business grows and you become less hands-on with all aspects of the company. Plus, consumers’ standards for service are higher than they’ve ever been,–and they have many options if your business doesn’t live up to their expectations.

How can you make sure your customer service stays stellar day in and day out? Ask yourself these questions:

  • Is my website user-friendly? Can customers easily tell what to do when they visit your business website? Make sure key information, like your business’s phone number, hours, address and directions, are visible right near the top of the home page.
  • Stocksy_txpc1714160lD3000_Small_130635Is my physical location welcoming? A clearly-marked entrance; an inviting store window or lobby; and employees who make eye contact, smile and greet customers with a friendly welcome as they walk in the door all combine to kick the customer experience off on a positive note.
  • Are my employees empowered to give great service? If employees have to “get a manager” to make any exception to a rule, irate customers are likely to get even more annoyed. Set parameters, but within those guidelines, give your employees leeway to make their own decisions about how to satisfy a customer.
  • Are my employees educated about my product or service? These days, customers can instantly turn to the Internet on their smartphones to get a wealth of information about the products you sell—and the other companies that sell them. It’s crucial your employees know your wares thoroughly so they can answer questions, make suggestions and offer expert advice before customers turn to your competitors.
  • Do I listen as well as talk on social media? Social media is a great way to engage with customers, but make sure it’s not a one-way street. Don’t just share info about your business; also listen to what customers are saying about your business. If what they’re saying is negative or critical, or if a customer is asking for help, respond immediately and take steps to make changes.
  • Do I offer lots of customer service options? Customers today want choices in everything—even in how they communicate with your company. Offer as many options as possible for how you provide customer service—from in-person and by phone to email and live chat. If you have something for everyone, you’ll keep everyone happy. 



 
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