Posts Tagged ‘Communication’


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How to Improve Employee Communication

10-28 Intergenerational communicationIs your business struggling with communication issues between different age groups at work? While the problem of intergenerational communication is nothing new (remember the “Generation Gap” of the 60s?), it’s more pronounced than ever because there are so many different generations in the work force today. As older workers put off retirement due to the past recession, your business may have Millennials, Generation X and Baby Boomers all on the same team.

Technology is widening the generation gap in business. When younger workers who grew up with smartphones meet up with Baby Boomers hanging on to their flip phones, sparks can fly. Boomers may feel that Millennials are rude and tactless because they’re always looking at their phones and want to “talk” via text, while Millennials feel Boomers are slow and old-fashioned because they take notes on paper and want to talk face-to-face.

How can you resolve these communication issues? Try these tips.

  • Bring generations together. Create teams with diverse age groups so employees can learn from each other and get beyond stereotypes. There’s nothing like getting to know someone to dispel your preconceptions about that age group. Believing that all older people are tech dinosaurs or all 20-somethings are text-happy social media mavens ignores each person’s reality. (In fact, one study from Cornerstone reports Gen Y (Millennials) is the generation most likely to say they’re suffering from “tech overload.”)
  • Have workers bring each other up to speed. Younger employees can show older ones how to use IM or social media. Even if they don’t need to do it for their jobs, they’ll appreciate not feeling left behind.
  • Make sure no one gets left out. Company-wide information, such as announcements or operations manuals, should be distributed in a format that all employees know how to access, such as via email. This ensures even the less tech-savvy workers get the information they need.
  • Use multiple communications tools. Mixing it up is good for everyone. Encourage employees to use the method that fits the message. That might be IM and texting sometimes, email or phone calls at other times and even walking across the office to talk to someone in person (gasp) when it’s called for.
  • Lead by example. Be a good communicator yourself—get out of your office, walk around and see what’s going on, and become familiar with multiple communications tools so you can interact with everyone on your team the way they prefer. 

Mondays with Mike: How To Get Your Entire Business Running On The Cloud In One Day

Stocksy_txpe7e51ee740B000_Small_134978A lot of business owners put off making big decisions – like transitioning their company to running on the cloud – because they fear change.  They’re reluctant to undertake a major overhaul because they know that difficulties will arise, and there will be a learning curve for their staff.

 

For the most part, they’re right.  Change is a struggle.  But it’s a struggle worth taking on.  My advice to entrepreneurs considering making the switch to a cloud-based office is to take a deep breath, get a few things in place ahead of time, and dive right in!  If you follow these steps, your transition will be smooth and will put you on the road to flexibility you’ve only dreamed of.  

 

The key to a seamless transition to the cloud is doing your homework and making a workable plan.

 

First, you want to pick your date.  There actually is a very best day for major business transitions – January 1st.  While everyone else in the world is sleeping off a hangover, you have a full day to make you changes and start working out the bugs before the world returns to work.  A new fiscal year makes record keeping easier, and since you’re likely to do little actual business, you’ll be able to focus on your transition.  Working out the kinks on a slow day lets you troubleshoot without the stress of impatient customers.

 

Next, you’ll want to make a list of all the applications and programs you use and sort them into three categories:  apps you use daily, ones you use monthly, and ones that you use occasionally or only for special purposes.  How frequently you use an app will determine exactly how you transition it.

 

For apps you use daily – word processing, phone service, accounting – you’ll ideally want to port all of your information directly – say, from QuickBooks to QuickBoooks Online.  If that’s not an option, you’ll need to find a full replacement.  Keep in mind that any replacement will have differences, and you’ll want to familiarize yourself with those differences ahead of time.  Apps you use monthly can be replaced by cloud-based alternatives, and apps that you use infrequently may not need to be cloud-based at all.  It doesn’t make sense to spend the time and money looking for alternatives for programs that you seldom use.

 

Once you have your cloud-based applications selected, you should select your test users, and I strongly recommend that you don’t rely on your IT people for this task.  You want to get a feel for how the folks who will actually be in the trenches – the ones who will have to use the new tech to do their jobs – will interact with the new programs.  Once your test users are comfortable, you’re ready to roll the cloud out to the rest of the company, using your new experts as support staff.

 

If it’s possible, you should plan to run parallel for a few weeks.  Now I know that running parallel is double the work, but if you have a problem, you’ll be glad you did it.  Keeping the old system up for a brief period ensures that your customers don’t experience any troubles getting the same great service they’re used to.

 

Finally, since your business is now cloud-based, you need to develop an emergency plan – figure out what you’ll do if something goes wrong.  Think I’m overreacting?  When Superstorm Sandy swept through my neck of the woods, I managed to keep my business running from an emergency shelter.  How?  I’d already planned and tested how my office would handle needing to work in less-than-ideal circumstances.  Knowing that if the power goes out you can still do business is key.

 

Is it a lot of work to get your business up and running on the cloud?  You bet!  Is it worth it to get flexibility and increased productivity?  Absolutely.  While making the transition in a day may not be ideal, it is possible, which demonstrates that you shouldn’t be afraid to make the leap.


Mondays with Mike: How To Become A TED Speaker

TED-Talk-WebTED can change your life, and I’m not just talking about the insights you can glean from the brilliant ideas shared by the many speakers. I’m talking about giving a TED talk – one single engagement that will expose you, your ideas, and your brand to millions of people. It’s the biggest public speaking opportunity around, and it ain’t an easy one to land.  

I’ve given a few TEDx talks – the regional feeder program for TED, and I sat down with the curator of TEDx Hoboken, Elizabeth Barry, to get some insight into what the curators are looking for and some strategies that speakers can use to get the opportunity of giving a talk. If your goal is to give a TED talk, TEDx is the logical place to start.  

 

Let’s start with Elizabeth’s list of dos and don’ts for landing a TEDx talk:

 

DO NOT:

  • Pitch yourself or your business. TED and TEDx talks focus on ideas, rather than people.
  • Simply repeat an earlier performance. Find a fresh idea.
  • Think you’re more important than your idea.

DO:

  • Be real and be kind. You’re not the focus of the talk; your idea is.
  • Present an idea that’s original, profound, and genuinely worth spreading.
  • Bring all your passion and expertise.
  • Focus on your idea and its applications in the lives of others.  Your talk should be more than simply a story about your life. Look for an idea that can benefit your audience.

Elizabeth stressed that TED and TEDx aren’t about grandstanding. Sure, the events generate great publicity, but the goal of the project is to spread and profound ideas that make a difference in people’s lives.  

 

Once you’ve landed and given a TEDx talk, you can focus on the big fish. One thing you should keep in mind is that TED was created by a group of journalists, so your best angle is to focus on a compelling story. Additionally, you should consult the editorial calendar to make sure your great idea wasn’t covered by the previous quarter’s talks. 

 

You should absolutely promote the heck out of your TEDx video – since each view is a new (and trackable) impression, but it’s essential that you not simply try to recycle your TEDx content. Don’t lose sight of the fact that it’s your idea that’s the focus. Should you land a TED gig, it’s not simply because you’re so wonderful; it’s because you have something important to share that can enrich the lives of the audience.

 

It’s impossible to overstate how huge a TED talk will be for your career. At the time I wrote this article, 1.2 million viewers had watched a TED talk given by a young man named Cesar Kuriyama. He stood on the stage and shared the insight he’d gained from his project in which he recorded one second of video every day and edited the clips into a video that captures the absolutely ordinary images that comprise our lives. The power of his talk was in the weight of the impressions that fill our lives … the ones that we too often take for granted and forget as soon as we’ve seen them.  

 

Kuriyama shared his experience of image and memory and the complex ways that we recall the events of our lives, both good and bad. Not only has he gained astounding publicity for his projects, but he’s also touched 1.2 million people with his idea worth sharing. That’s the power of TED. It’s a worthy goal.


4 Tips for Building Your Network Before You Start Your Business

Many would-be entrepreneurs think they’ve got to wait until they start a business to begin building a network of contacts and potential customers. Not so. 90 percent of all small business owners get business from referrals, so the sooner you start — both online and off — the sooner you can forge connections with people that will help you create a sustainable business. You also want to position yourself as a resource so that you can make connections that are meaningful. So don’t wait to start networking! Get started today.

Tip 1: Find Your Industry Peers Locally

?????????????????????????????????Depending on how large a city you live in, there may be networking or support groups for businesses in your industry. If that’s the case, begin your networking efforts there immediately. Join professional organizations or simply attend a few meetings so you can get to know the big (and small) players in the space where you want to do business.

How this will help you: Networking in person helps you assess what types of businesses you’ll be competing against, as well as provide ideas for how you can better serve your target audience. You can look for strategic partnerships. If you plan to only offer Service A, you can find others who offer Services B, C, and D, and by working together, you can reach more customers. And finally, you can find a mentor who can provide you with guidance through your journey into entrepreneurship.

Tip 2: Start Getting Social Online

Social media provides you with the fabulous opportunity to brand yourself and your soon-to-be business. You can create profiles for yourself now and start sharing content that will make you known in your field, before you even have a website for your company. Start by following people that fit the mold for the types of customers you’ll want for your business, and you’ll have an instant audience when you do launch.

How this will help you: Once you start your business, you’ll need an audience for your content. Social media is the ticket to getting more readers for your blog posts — and thereby more customers on your site. And being known as a thought leader will also net you plenty of followers.

Tip 3: Attend Conferences

Another spot rife with networking opportunity is industry conferences or local business events and workshops. Wherever people in your industry — or for that matter, your ideal customers — gather, you want to be there too. Collect business cards. Run your idea by people. Just get your name out there.

How this will help you: Not only do conferences provide great learning opportunities, but you can observe your competition closely. You can also bounce your business idea off of other people to see if it’s even got viability. You may find you need to tweak your strategy before you launch — by getting feedback from others now, you save the time and money of not launching a bad idea.

Tip 4: Join LinkedIn Groups

An even more specific social networking strategy, especially useful if you’re relatively new to an industry or owning a business, is to participate in LinkedIn groups that cater to that niche. Just like with other types of networking, LinkedIn provides access to smart folks who can give you ideas for your business, as well as let you get feedback from them before you start yours.

How this will help you: There’s plenty to learn from others, if you’re open to it. Read the articles and discussions, jump in where appropriate, and take plenty of notes. You’ll need them for your business.

Networking opportunities are abound, if you know where to look. It’s better to start your relationship-building now while you’ve got the time, because once you launch that business, you’re going to be really busy!


Good, Better, Best: How to Be the Best Leader for Your Small Business

Stocksy_txp4741dc94fC8000_Small_17003Like it or not, as a small business owner, one of your primary roles (if you’ve got employees, that is), is that of leader. If you haven’t had a lot of experience in the past in leading people, you might need a few pointers for polishing your skills. Not to worry: even if you’re not a born leader, it’s something you can improve with a bit of effort and education. And don’t be afraid to sign up for a leadership course.

The Qualities of a Great Leader

While everyone’s got their own opinion about what makes for killer leadership skills, most can’t argue that the following are qualities that can help you manage others with grace:

  • Solid listening & communication skills
  • Striving to help employees succeed
  • Empowering employees to make decisions
  • Striving for self-improvement
  • Learning from mistakes

How many of these qualities do you possess? If you need a brush-up, here are tips for expanding your abilities on each point:

  • Listening & Communication: Let your employees speak without you interrupting them. Pause before responding, and really consider what they’ve said.
  • Help Employees Succeed: If an employee comes to you with a problem, don’t just listen; act. Show him that you keep your word by making change to help him overcome his obstacle.
  • Empower Employees: Show your staff that you trust them to make decisions without your constant approval. They’ll blossom if you let them.
  • Self-Improvement: Realize that good leaders never assume they’ve reached the top, and keep striving to better their skills.
  • Learn from Mistakes: Just like anyone, you’re fallible, so rather than try to deny your errors, take them as valuable lessons.

Why You Should Strive to Be a Great Leader

Do you really need to improve your leadership skills? If you care about keeping your staff happy (and at your company), you should care. As Eric Jackson quotes the old saying in this Forbes article, people quit their bosses, not their jobs. Do you really want to be the reason you keep losing good talent?

Your staff looks to you for guidance on how to conduct themselves, as well as how your company is run. A good leader inspires her staff, not makes them cower under their desks.

Owning Your Leadership Style

If you’ve been to business school or any kind of leadership training, you might be familiar with Lewin’s Three Leadership Styles. These date back to 1939, and while others have been identified since then, these styles of leadership still ring true today:

  • Autocratic: You make decisions on your own without the input of your team, and your word is law. You’re not open to suggestions from your staff, which may make them fearful of you, and may cause employees to be difficult to motivate or keep on board.
  • Democratic: You involve staff members in key decisions, though you still have the final word. Employees feel more vested in the company when they are encouraged by you to provide input.
  • Laissez-faire: This style of leadership isn’t always effective. You put the responsibility of decision-making in the hands of your employees, which may cause your team to feel confused and without strong guidance, since that’s not a laissez-faire leader’s strong suit.

Each of these leadership types (as well as others) has its benefits and drawbacks. The key is understanding which comes naturally to you, as well as which your staff responds best to. For example, if you identify with the autocratic style, but your staff seems afraid to come to you with ideas or issues, try on the democratic hat for a week or two and see if results change. It’s better to align yourself with your staff’s needs than stick to what’s easiest for you.

The better the leader you are, the happier your employees will be. And a small business with happy employees makes for a successful company.


5 Ways to Make Money Through Text Messaging for Your Small Business

???????????????????????????????It’s nearly impossible to go anywhere without seeing people using their smartphones to text, talk, use apps, or surf the web. More than 90 percent of the U.S. population has mobile phones, and those individuals spend 19 hours per day with the device at arm’s length (some even more!). If you’re not using text messaging as part of your marketing and business development plan, you’re missing out on serious opportunity to connect with your customers and increase sales.

Text messages are one of the most-read methods of communication, with a 97 percent open rate (that’s much higher than the average email gets). And 85 percent of text messages are read within 15 minutes of receipt. This is a boon if you’re trying to get people’s attention right now. Here’s a look at how you can leverage text messages to make money for your small business.

  1. Get permission first.  You must make sure that your customers want to hear from you via text message, or you’ll risk suffering a huge backlash and potentially losing customers.
  2. Use text messaging as a relationship building tool. Like with any type of business development venture, don’t immediately start using a text messaging strategy to sell products and services. Instead texting should first be a way to build relationships with current customers and prospects. Send out useful information that customers will want, such as appointment reminders or coupons. Just remember not to send text messages too frequently or you’ll risk irritating people.
  3. Use text messaging to support existing marketing and sales efforts. One of the best ways to use text messaging is to present special offers, which lead customers to buy in the store or online. For example, if your business has a sale on a Monday, a text message can be sent Sunday afternoon to remind customers about this opportunity to shop and save.​​Starbucks will often send out text messages to customers reminding them to use their “treat receipt” (morning coffee receipt) to buy an afternoon drink at a discounted price. The “treat receipt” is an existing sales strategy, and adding the text messaging component helps to encourage customers to come back for a second purchase on the same day.
  4. Develop exclusive mobile content. You want customers to pay attention to the text messages you send. As such, don’t simply promote the same discounts and offers you send in email and your website. Create specific offers such as a 20 percent discount using a text message code. This will train the buyer not to ignore your texts.
  5. Find the right service provider. This is an important step in order to deploy a text messaging strategy for your business. There are text messaging platforms available for iPhones and Android devices that allow geo-tracking, which shows the geographic location of the mobile device holder. This is important if you plan to send text offers to customers who are near your business.

A text messaging strategy is a critical part of business development and marketing in today’s multi-channel marketing world. Remember to use texting to form relationships before going straight for the sale, and think about a strategy before sending your first message. 


Does Business Etiquette Still Matter?

?????????????In recent years, business has become very casual. Gone are the work days of suits, stationary, big titles, corner offices, secretaries, and power lunches. Small business is now done through email, video chats, texting, meet ups, social media and casual attire.

However, etiquette still matters in business and can be a competitive advantage for you. Here is how:

Attire: How you look still matters. While John T. Molloy’s classic “Dress for Success” maybe outdated, someone who is dressed too sloppy or casual will still not be trusted as a person that is dressed as well as their customer. Appropriate attire choices also must made for video chats unless you want to show your customer your workout outfit.

Writing: Since so much of communication is done in short informal manner, there is greater chance of miscommunication. Being able to write effective email communications is still an important skill and requires increased practice. This can be done by sending an email to a customer and then following up immediately by phone to make sure that they understood exactly what you wrote.

Dining: A lot can be learned by having a meal with a business associate. People can win or lose a deal, promotion or job based on their table manners. This doesn’t necessarily mean using the right fork, but still includes RSVPs, keeping your napkin on your lap, elbows off the table, and chewing with your mouth closed. Not sure of your habits? Have a friend take note at your next lunch.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device): More companies are not issuing smart phones, but instead are having employees bring their own smart phones.  As a result, personal and business data are mixing on the same device. It is critical to set the rules in advance as to what type of access the employer has for inspection of that device and whether it can be wiped cleaned when that employee leaves.

Travel: More small companies are doing business in different countries.  They need to be aware of various business and dining customs, business hierarchies, displays of affection and alcohol use. Important customs vary by country and culture.

Social Networking: Many small business owners and employees have separate social media sites for business and personal use. However, their brand image on both sites need to be consistent since customers will do a web search that will cover all of them. Personal and professional lives can no longer be practically separated.

Also remember that different generations will prefer different etiquette so this will add to its overall complexity. A great guide for the small business owner is the 2014 version of Emily Post’s “The Etiquette Business Advantage

What business etiquette is most important to you?


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: 5 Keys to Success in a Family Business

Stocksy_txp9b4a083fTr5000_Small_64619Did you know that 70 percent of family businesses never make it to the second generation? How can you avoid your family business becoming that kind of sad statistic? The key to keeping a family business surviving—and thriving—is communication. Here are five keys to good communication in your family-owned business.

  1. Pay attention. Is someone making a lot of bitter comments, showing up to work late (or not at all), or otherwise acting out? Keeping your eyes and ears open to what’s going on around you can nip communication problems in the bud.
  2. Address issues openly. Rightly or wrongly, many families “communicate” (or don’t) by sweeping things under the rug or denying that problems exist. When this kind of miscommunication infects the workplace, it can destroy your business. No matter how tough it is, make it a point to bring up problems before they fester.
  3. Keep it all in the family. Family business conflicts should be addressed openly, but that doesn’t mean they should be discussed in front of non-family employees. Call a family meeting or hold a one-on-one with the individual involved to hash out the problem before you involve non-family workers.
  4. Never assume. Because people are family, you may assume they will respond to things in certain ways or assign certain behaviors to them. (“Susan always gets offended by little things.”) Try to get beyond the “roles” that siblings, parents or other family members play in the family (the smart one, the peacemaker) and focus on the roles they play in the business. Give your family employees the same respect you’d give non-family employees and don’t attribute feelings to them without actually asking them how they’re feeling and what they’re thinking.
  5. Air the grievances. Let each family member get their feelings out in the open, even if you feel that one person is obviously right and the other wrong. An outside advisor, such as a family business consultant, your board of advisors or even a family therapist, can be helpful in mediating family business issues impartially. (It’s important, though, to make sure all family business members agree on who the outside advisor/s should be—ideally, before any problems arise.)

Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How Do Your Employees Really Feel About the 24/7 Workplace?

Is your small business using technologies that enable employees to stay connected to work even outside of work hours? If so, are you concerned your employees might feel overloaded by the need to check in with work when they’re off the clock?

Well, stop worrying. According to a recent Gallup Poll of full-time U.S. employees, nearly 80 percent of them feel somewhat or very positive about being able to use computers and/or mobile devices to stay connected to their jobs outside of normal working hours.

???????????????????????????????????A cynic would say perhaps one reason so many people feel good about being able to check in with work after-hours is that most of them don’t actually do it. About one-third (36 percent) frequently connect with work online after-hours, while 64 percent admit to doing so occasionally, rarely or not at all. (Apparently, they just like knowing the option is available.)

However, don’t be so cynical just yet. The study also reveals that 86 percent of those who regularly check in with work of their own accord, and 81 percent of those whose employers require them to do so, think it’s a positive development.

Of course, employees like being able to connect with their jobs outside regular working hours because it enables them to do things like attend their children’s school functions, take time off or work flexible hours. But work-life balance can quickly tip out of balance, as every small business owner knows from experience.

How can you ensure that the ability to work after-hours continues to have an upside for your team? Here are 3 tips:

  • Pay attention. If you notice employees seem like they’re starting to burn out, grumble or complain, assess what’s going wrong. Sometimes the ability to check in 24/7 can lead to a compulsion to do so.
  • Encourage downtime. Make sure employees have “disconnect” time to recharge their personal batteries by unplugging from their devices. Model this behavior yourself.
  • Pull back. Even if you require employees to be available and check in after normal work hours, try to set reasonable limits. For example, you could say that employees must be available up until 10 p.m and after 7 a.m. Even if employees have to be available 24/7, try staggering that responsibility so everyone gets some days off. 



 
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