Posts Tagged ‘Branding’


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Are You Ignoring Your Returning Customers?

1-20-15 customer rewards smallHave you ever had this experience: You see an ad or offer for some amazing deal for a company of which you’re a longtime customer—something big, like “50% off a year’s membership.” Wow, you want to take advantage of that! But you can’t because there’s only one catch: The offer is for new customers only. “Hmph,” you think. “What am I, chopped liver?”

Many small businesses make the mistake of ignoring their biggest source of income: recurring customers. OK, maybe not “ignoring” them completely, but giving them the short end of the stick when it comes to attention, special offers and prime treatment.

It’s natural that getting new customers should be a key part of your business strategy. After all, every company needs new business in the pipeline to survive and grow. But the bulk of your time and attention should go to your existing customers. Why? Here are just a few reasons:

  • They’re already loyal customers.
  • It costs less to keep them satisfied (and buying) than it does to replace them.
  • Keep them happy and they’ll tell friends about your business.

What can you do to provide better treatment for your returning customers? Here are some ideas:

  • Hold special sales or events just for loyal customers.
  • Offer them early access to new merchandise or services.
  • Give them the chance to lock in current prices for the coming year or when they renew.
  • Use automation tools such as a CRM system to track details about your customers so you can personalize your customer service, offers and interactions. You can even greet them appropriately when they call your business!
  • Use technology that creates a record of customer service interactions so that when recurring customers contact you with problems, you can quickly access their histories.
  • Investigate loyalty programs for small businesses. There are many affordable options that integrate with your marketing, enabling more targeted outreach to returning customers.

It’s OK to create special offers and deals for new customers only—just be sure you provide equivalent or better rewards for customers who have shown their loyalty to your business. 


How to Kickstart Your Marketing Efforts in 2015

1-14 Kickstart Mktg smallMarketing is the engine that feeds your small business.  As we jump into the new year, it’s time to kickstart your marketing and public relations activities. You want to divide your activities by those that engage prospect customers and those that keep your existing customer.  Here are five ways to kickstart your marketing machine in your small business:

  1. Send a Note to Existing Customers to Check-In: To keep your business top of mind, send an email to check-in and see what’s going on with your existing customers. Don’t make it about any kinds of hard sell, just call to say happy new year.  Be sure to put your business phone number, address, website, social media contacts in your email signature, so they can give you a quick call or note back.
  2. Organize Your Calendar: Look at your 2015 calendar and mark down any special dates that are relevant in your industry. Think of creative ways to share information that will bring customers in especially on key holidays. If you’re a retailer, you can run promotions for President’s Day, Valentine’s Day, 4th of July or Halloween. Holidays are opportunities to make sales on related products. Take advantage of it.
  3. Build a New Partnership: One of the fastest ways to find new customers is by partnering with a business that already has complimentary clients or relationships you’re looking for.  By leveraging the credibility of a partner they can pave the way for their clients to trust your business much faster.  Also be willing to present yourself as a white label solution. Remember, 20% of a deal you would have never had is great profit.
  4. Create a new free offer: Everyone loves free stuff. A great way to get potential customers to give you their contact email is to create a free download offer. If you are a financial planner, offer a free report or ebook with tips for “How to Retire RICH Before 50.”  Once you get their contact information use email to nurture the relationship.
  5. Get More Social: This year look for opportunities to boost your social media marketing efforts. Look at ways to build more engagement on your social accounts. Consider kicking it up on your  Facebook page, Instagram account, in your LinkedIn Groups, Pinterest boards and Twitter account. Try venturing out the one new social media site this year. Try Searching popular topics or hashtags that people are engaged in so you can join the conversation.

You can use a combination of these methods to kickstart your marketing efforts this year to keep your business top of mind with your target customers.  


5 Must-Know Mobile Marketing Tips

free wifi cafeThe mobile market keeps growing and flourishing, and the best of it may still be ahead of us. As more people rely on their smartphones throughout the day, these devices become veritable marketing tools. Just as with any emerging technology, using mobile early in the game can be a major benefit to marketing to your customers. That being said, not all small businesses know where to begin in using mobile marketing. There are several things you should keep in mind as you explore this latest and exciting frontier:

1. Your web presence must be mobile friendly

Both your emails and your website should be optimized for mobile. It’s not enough to just design your page and then release it. Test it on as many platforms as you can and make it easy for people to report problems. Yahoo has some good advice on the topic. Even if none that technical information means much to you, the bottom line is that your page or newsletter needs to render quickly (<4 secs), be legible, and easy to navigate.

2. Get to know your mobile customers

Metrics are important. It is vital for you to know what works for your company. How do you keep track of that data? Google Analytics is one place to start. Pay attention to the pages that attract a mobile audience and focus your efforts there at first. Notice what campaigns attract mobile traffic over desktop traffic. Mobile customers have different priorities than traditional traffic, and conversion rates are very different. Pay attention to their needs and make it easy for them to find what they need. Mobile is growing, and as a business owner, it is better to be in front of your customer rather than chasing her from behind.

3. Mobile marketing is not just advertising on a smartphone

Mobile customers require a different method of communication. There is no consensus on the baseline of what works with mobile customers. We are at the leading edge of mobile marketing and no one quite knows where we are headed, but there are some best practices that you can play with to see what works best for you. Retailers should be thinking about how to deploy mobile engagement either through in-store posters or even QR codes. Other businesses may want to use text messaging to engage their audience. Social media definitely dovetails here, but the specifics will differ depending on your industry.

4. Exploit location-based services

Because so much of mobile web traffic is related to search, now is the time to make sure you have claimed your page on the various sites, such as Google Pages, Facebook Pages, Yelp, and Foursquare. This is an easy and relatively low effort task that may offer a payout later on. It also demonstrates that you are paying attention to the emerging trends, and are open to communicating with your audience on different networks and sites. You simply never know where a referral will come from, and you never know when or where your company will get in front of your next customer.

5. Respect your audience

This goes without saying, but the reality is that the temptation is there to use exploitative tactics to get extra facetime with your audience. Mobile’s relevance may be undercut if your audience feels manipulated, so tread carefully as you probe this new technology. It may be tempting to repeat verbatim what you’ve said on social media page or newsletter, but mobile is its own medium, so consider mobile a new channel and program accordingly.


Mondays with Mike: The New Marketing Trend That’s Here To Stay

1-5-15 authencitiy seal smallLimited time!  Lowest price!  Buy now!

Consumers are inundated with claims on their attention, time, and money.  We’re tired of brand impressions everywhere we turn, and we crave something different.  What works right now for consumers in our crowded marketplace? 

Authenticity.  Surprising, isn’t it?  What’s most effective is providing great value to customers who feel invested in your success.  Here’s what you need to know about making an authentic connection with your customers and transforming them into your biggest fans.

  1. Tell your story.  Customers want to support ordinary people, folks they can relate to, and it’s your job to convey your tale in a compelling way.  Hint – you may need help here … that’s what great marketing companies can help with.   Whether you tell your rags-to-riches saga, or whether you detail your unorthodox approach to success, you need to define what sets you apart from the crowd – that’s your message, your story.
  2. Use the phoenix effect.  They mythical phoenix is consumed by flames and reborn from the ashes.  We love to hear tales about someone who manages to start fresh, overcoming adversity, to make it big.  Part of telling your story should convey the unique challenges you’ve faced.
  3. Don’t start a pity party.  You don’t want customers to buy from you just because they feel sorry for you, so it’s important to cast your story – even if it includes difficulties – in a positive light.  Don’t spend too much time whining about how hard it was; focus, instead, on how far you’ve come.  Tell your customers how proud you are of your hard work and achievements.
  4. Don’t brag.  You do not want to make prospective customers envious of your success.  Take Donald Trump as an example.  We may admire some of his success, and we may even choose to adopt some of his business practices, but I don’t know anyone who’s dying to fork over their hard-earned money simply to enrich The Donald.  You don’t want to flaunt your success.  You want to earn loyal supporters.
  5. Have an enemy.  Whether it’s the huge, soulless corporation that you’re struggling to compete with, or whether it’s rigid, outdated practices you’re revolutionizing, people love to root for the underdog.  As part of your narrative, you need to situate your business in a context – give your clients a reason to invest in your success.
  6. Be part of your community.  If you could choose to spend your money with a big company who spirits the profits to somewhere on the other side of the world or with a small company who reinvests in the local community, which would it be?  No contest, right.  Make sure you share the good work you’re doing to make your town or neighborhood a better place to live and work.

Authentic marketing is a refreshing, revolutionary approach, and one that shows no signs of going away.  We’re tired of overblown, high-pressure sales tactics, and we crave a real connection with the companies we choose to do business with.  Make sure you take the time to share your unique vision, journey, and mission with your customers.


Saving Your Customers From Customer Satisfaction

got loyaltyHave you ever had a customer tell you on a survey that she is "satisfied" or even "very satisfied"–and then leave you the next day for one of your competitors? An experience like this, where nothing goes wrong yet the customer goes away, can lead a business leader to wonder if satisfactory customer service–a solid customer experience, in other words–is enough to ensure customer engagement and loyalty.

The research on the subject would confirm your doubts that there's a connection between self-reported customer satisfaction and what a business really is looking for: customer engagement and customer loyalty.

Various research, including the work that provides the conceptual basis for the entire Net Promoter Score methodology, has found a weak link at best between a self-reported satisfied customer and repeat purchases from that customer. (And most of this research was done before it became as easy to switch suppliers as it is today in our globalized, de-frictionalized, broadbanded economy.)

So here's the deal. Here's the reason there's no clear-cut connection between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. It's quite possible to satisfy a customer without leaving an indelible impression on him or her.  Getting a customer to return depends on more than satisfaction.  It depends on giving the customer a reason to come back. 

The most bulletproof reason you can have for a customer to return, of course, is to have a product or service they absolutely can't get anywhere else, and that they really, truly need or desire.  Apple (if you're hooked), Google (if you're alive), Oxford (if Mum and Grandfather attended and will disinherit you if you don't follow suit) all fall into this enviable category.  Also falling into this category, due solely to geography, are (if you don't like to drive) your corner dry cleaner and (if you don't like to drive after drinking) your corner pub.

For the rest of us in business, those of us whose services or products aren't absolutely unique and irreplaceable, the best way to give a customer a reason to come back is through a customer experience methodology I call "homebuilding." This means building a customer experience that feels to your customer like an ideal vision of home. Think of it as having three parts:

  1. The customer needs to know that you're happy to hear from them and are dropping all other concerns except the customer's own pleasure, safety, and success the moment they enter your establishment/call on the phone/email or chat with you.
  2. The customer needs to feel, while they're experiencing your service or the purchase and use of your product, that they are receiving something special.  Specifically, that you are tailoring your service to their particular needs, interests, and wishes in an anticipatory manner that doesn't even require them to ask or explain themselves.  That you are serving "even the unexpressed wishes" of this customer, to use the Ritz-Carlton's trademark phrase.
  3. The customer needs to know, as they are leaving your business at the end of the transaction, that their business matters to you, and that it matters to you that they return soon.

The business-killing hazard of “Who Cares?” 

These three, somewhat fluffy-sounding customer experience elements are important because the problem of the satisfied-but-not-loyal customer comes down to this: You are always at the mercy of a great big “who cares?" from the customer.

Think about it: Do you think passengers mentally thank Delta every time it doesn't lose their bag, doesn't overbook their seat, and so forth?

Generally they don't. They don't even think to do so.  The airline didn't lose their bag, didn't overbook their seat, but who cares? It's not really their job as customers, actually, to care.

There is a way to build customer loyalty via customer satisfaction. But it's hard.

There is, actually, a way to build customer loyalty via satisfactory customer service.  You can, eventually, build customer loyalty via cycles of repeated, unrelentingly "satisfactory" service. In other words, the correlation between satisfactory service and customer retention increases the more iterations that the customer experiences satisfactory service: if a restaurant treats a guest fine once, it's no big deal, and it's not going to correlate very well with customer retention; that guest may go anywhere for lunch the next time. 

However, if for whatever reason the guest happens to come back, and if she then gets at least temporarily in the habit of coming back, and if she's treated fine-but-not-exceptionally-memorably every time, after, say, 5 visits the likelihood of a 6th visit becomes a pretty good bet.  The tricky thing is that that's a lot of "ifs." For each of those first five iterations, the customer is an open target for other marketing, passive or active.  Who knows where she may go for lunch the 2nd, or 3rd, or 4th, or 5th time; anywhere in there she may get distracted and wander over to a competitor.

So I try, as a customer service and customer loyalty consultant, to warn businesses away from thinking their best path to a customer’s heart is year after year of giving good-enough service and hoping that nobody else’s good-enough service catches their eye.

The better way to kickstart customer loyalty

Better, I argue, is to give extra consideration and do the extra customer experience and customer service work needed on the important touches–the attention, the recognition–that can directly break through customers' apathy, that can break through a customer's default position of "who cares?"– a default position that unfortunately is likely to be held even by customers who are "satisfied" with everything about you as a brand.

Because that's the way to build customer engagement and customer loyalty, directly and reliably. And it's worth it.


Mondays with Mike: What’s In A Name? 8 Tips For Finding The Perfect Name

12-22 Hello my name is smallWe all know those iconic product names – the ones that speak for entire categories:  Kleenex.™  Coke.™  Even Cronut,™ for those of you looking at more recent examples.  Names are powerful, and while some entrepreneurs luck into great names, there are steps you can take to improve your chances of selecting the perfect name, one that conveys your unique attributes.

  1. Avoid sound-alikes.  If you’re entering a category with some high-profile leaders, you’re better off avoiding confusion by selecting a name that is distinctly different.  If you’re starting a delivery company, picking a name like YewPS not only begs for mixups, but it also sets you up for trade name infringement problems.  Be unique!
  2. Use mnemonics.  Yellowtail, the huge wine brand from Australia is the perfect example of a name that leverages mnemonics.  Not only is the kangaroo on the label associated with the continent of origin, but the color coded labels also make it easy for consumers to pick up the variety they want from a sea of choices.
  3. Tell a story.  Whether humble or grand, every company has a story to tell.  Look at Ralph Lauren’s logo.  The polo player tells the tale of privilege and cultural capital.  The polo player’s inclusion in the logo associates the brand name with a desirable, iconic story, a story that translates to millions of dollars every year.
  4. Make it easy to spell.  As more and more consumers turn to online resources to find products and companies, it becomes increasingly more important that prospective customers be able to spell your name.  Choose a name that’s easy to spell, and you’re making your business easy to find.
  5. Make it easy to pronounce.  If you can trust anyone on this point, you can trust me, Mike Michalowicz.  My name is my brand, and since I’m kinda stuck with what my parents gave me, I’ve made light of it – including the pronunciation (mi-KAL-o-wits, in case you’re curious) everywhere I can.
  6. Embed a secret in your logo.  Once you find the arrow in the FedEx logo, or the people holding chips in the Tostitos logo, you’ll find yourself showing your friends, and you’ll notice it every time you see a truck or a bag of chips.  Giving your customers cool little secrets to share helps pull them in as marketers of your brand.
  7. Change the spelling.  Now you want to be careful here, but a misspelled brand name CAN be the key to success.  Krispy Kreme.  Chick-Fil-A.  Tumblr.  Froot Loops.  Liquid Plumr.  The list could go on for miles.  These names are memorable, partly because of their unconventional spelling.  The caution here is that you not stray so far from the correct spelling that you make it hard for customers to find you.
  8. Make your name a verb.  You know you’ve made it when people start using your brand name as a verb.  You can Skype your friends.  You Google something when you want to know the answer.  Even if you use a different search engine, you know what it means to Google something.  Category leaders with memorable names can end up standing for all the other companies in their field.

Of all the business decisions entrepreneurs face, selecting a name is one of the most important.  Your company or product name is your brand, your identity, and your statement to the world.  Make sure you select it wisely.


Why You Need a Google Alias Now

11-28 hiding behind a mask smallGoogle has become another social media tool that allows its Google Plus clients to use something other than their real name. These aliases or pseudonyms can be a nickname or just a series of letters. When Google launched their social tool a few years back, they wanted people to build a network based on people with real names. They recently ditched this idea in their terms of service in favor of a growing trend for any creative ID to act as a name similar to those used on Twitter and Youtube. However, there are limits to how many times a user can change their name in a given period of time.

If authenticity is so important online, why would a business person want to use an alias?

  1. Get greater separation between personal and online life. Despite popular practices, not everything should be shared online. Many business people have opinions that they want to post that should not be associated with their business (and for good reasons).
  2. Prevent stalkers. There are a lot of weird and predatory people surfing the Internet. An alias gives more privacy which is a difficult commodity in an Internet connected world. It provides a barrier to actually meeting these crazy people in real life. Any pseudonym can be deleted and recreated in a different form at any time.
  3. Prevents work colleagues on viewing personal work or opinions online. Personal views may conflict with business employees or customers. It allows this body of work new opinions posted under an alias not to be viewed through the filter of a real known person.
  4. Aliases bring a new start. Anyone can create an online alter ego. This can be an outlet for creativity and exploration. Different personas can also cover a variety of niche areas without conflict.

Be careful. There are drawbacks of an alias which include:

  1. Adds stress to life. Constantly mentally separating to be an alias can be time consuming. This is especially true if it becomes more popular than the real life version of the person.
  2. The temptation of less accountability. Hiding behind an alias will tempt many business people to say and do things that they would not with their real identities. This can cause real life regret. Caution should still be used because no one should assume that an alias will never be connected to the real person.
  3. More conflicts. People may be put off when they find you are the alias for a pseudonym that they despise. Steve Colbert says he is playing a character on The Colbert Report and has a difficult time being viewed as himself.
  4. Changing perceptions. Once an alias becomes well established, it's hard to transfer that online capital to a real person. When Amber Osborne wanted to come out from behind her alias "blue haired Miss Destructo " persona,  there were many challenges. Some people did not want to view her as anything else except her alias. Think about the stereotyping of actors for certain roles like William Shatner as the iconic Captain Kirk and James Gandolfini as mob boss Tony Soprano.

Have you created a personal alias separate from the business? What has been the results?


How to Guarantee More Engagement for Your Blog

11-6 Blogging for business - small“If you build it, they will come”- from the movie, “Field of Dreams”

You just finished writing an insightful piece for your company’s blog that may change the industry. Now, all that has to be done is post it and people will write hundreds of reactions, right? No, this is wrong. The “just because you build it” strategy, doesn’t mean users will find the website and react to it.

Instead, here are seven surefire techniques to get more engagement for your posts:

  1. Be relevant, controversial or entertaining. Don’t be like your competitors. Post content that people want to read that can’t be found other places on the web. Have a point of view that will challenge readers and push them to respond. This is one place where a “me too” strategy does not work.
  2. Be regular. Post at least weekly. The more that users know there will be new content on a web site, the more likely they are to read it on a regular basis. This is the only way to build a sustained following that will make users comfortable enough for commenting on the blog posts.
  3. Be visual. People would much rather see a picture or watch a two minute video than read a long detailed article. Use numbers in titles and throughout the articles to attract users looking for simple solutions. The numbers 5 and 7 are most popular with readers.
  4. Be an easy read. Don’t construct posts that are dense with text. Make it simple to pick out the relevant points so a user can respond even if they did not read the entire post in detail. Use subheads, numbers and bolding to hook the reader.
  5. Add links. Don’t let users leave the company blog by clicking through on links. Ensure that all outside links open in a separate browser window so users can easily come back to your page. Also, include internal web links that will refer to other content on your blog to generate additional traffic for older posts.
  6. Share. Utilize share buttons for Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Google Plus on the company blog page. Test that the actual “share” includes a short description and relevant picture. Post notifications from your business handle about the content. This needs to be posted more than one time, but without repeating the same title. Take different angles of the article to use as headlines when posting again on various social media platforms.
  7. Watch style and grammar. No one wants to read a post that has spelling errors or language syntax problems. It also reflects very badly on the brand. The reader will ask themselves: If they can’t spell correctly, can I trust them to solve my problem? Broken links will also frustrate the user. If you can’t get an additional person to review the post then read it aloud and click through on all links to find any errors. Tools can be used to periodically find broken links on the company web site. http://www.wpuniversity.com/blog/5-tools-find-broken-links

How do you get users to interact with your blog content?


Mondays with Mike: 6 Creative Ways To Make Sales Internationally (Even If You Think You Can’t)

11-3 International competition smallAs the marketplace expands to cover more and more of the globe, you’re going to realize your competition may not just be the guy across the street.  It might be a guy in Mexico or China.  The big difference in having competition in another country is that you can’t simply focus on defensive measures to preserve your business.  You must start thinking about offense – what you can do to increase your market share by expanding your client base.

Say you own a little pizza shop.  Now I’m not going to pretend that it’s a good idea to figure out ways to deliver pizzas to China, but what I am telling you is that you can find a way to market yourself overseas.  Here’s how you can make it work:

  1. Convert your offering to information.  Pizzas don’t travel well, but books and videos do!  Whether you create a series of videos sharing your tips and secrets on running a small business, or whether you create a recipe book based on your Italian grandmother’s recipes, one of the best ways to cultivate business all over the globe is by creating a unique product that’s easily marketable online.
  2. Embrace the power of Skype.  While you may not be able to shake the hands of the folks buying your new recipe book in other countries, what you can do is have a small bookshop conduct a Q&A Skype session for the people buying your book.  You can use Skype to meet your fans and give them a personal connection to you and your brand.
  3. Leverage your culture.  The US has cultural capital, and there’s no reason not to cash in on it!  Establish yourself as a uniquely American business (with a plan that will work in other countries as well.)  If you’re selling your business model and sharing coaching tips, you can even promote cross-cultural awareness by encouraging your new international contacts to share the difficulties and successes they face in other countries.
  4. Play up the pen pal effect.  So you’re helping other businesses get on their feet … why not send them a little piece of your home country?  Receiving fun mail is increasingly uncommon.  Just think about how excited your international customers would be to get a handwritten letter from you.  Whether you reach out to bookstores selling your wares, or whether you ship a personalized thank you to people working on establishing a business that’s modeled after yours, your contact will make your brand memorable.
  5. Find a way to handle other currencies.  Whether you use PayPal or one of the other services that facilitates money transfers among different currencies, make sure you’re prepped so pesos and euros don’t keep you from completing sales.  Being able to work with other currencies lets you reach far more clients.
  6. Establish a local presence.  Once you get a foothold in another country, it’s important to signal your appreciation for and dedication to that business.  Whether you schedule personal appearances or establish a local bank account, consider getting more deeply involved in those communities who support your business.

It’s a big old world out there, and there are more potential customers every day.  Think big.  Think global.  Find some way to package your business for an international audience, and you’ll reap the benefits.




 
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