Posts Tagged ‘Brand’


How to Lower Your Bounce Rate on Your Small Business Website

???????You have a beautifully designed website. Check. Targeted keywords on the website. Check. You have a way to capture email addresses on your website. Check. So why aren’t you getting more customers from your small business website? You might have a decent flow of people visiting your site, but if they’re not converting to sales, it’s time to look at the reasons why. Start by examining your bounce rate.

What the Heck is a Bounce Rate?

Just like a shiny rubber ball, your bounce rate happens when people land on your site and then quickly bounce away. You can find your bounce rate by looking at your Google Analytics once e month. The technical definition for bounce rate: the percent of people who leave your site after visiting just one page. The higher the bounce rate, the more people are leaving rather than looking around. The average bounce rate is 50%. Here’s an illustration:

  1. Someone searches for something they’re looking for online.
  2. Your site shows up in those search results. They click your link.
  3. They land on your home page, don’t see what they expected, then leave.

So the question is: why are they not finding what they want? Why do they leave before even exploring your site? Typically there are a few reasons for this.

1. Your Design is Unappealing

While you wouldn’t expect a visitor to your site to hold bad design against you, first impressions really do matter. And if your website hasn’t been updated for 5 years, or is cluttered with ads or popups, there’s not much you can do to convince people to stay, even if your products are amazing.

Fortunately, there’s an easy fix for this: get a new design! Website design has come way down in pricing, and there are even templates and platforms you can customize and manage yourself.

2. Poor Keywords

Let’s say the name of your company is Red Ball Marketing. You don’t actually sell red balls, but people still land on your site looking to buy red balls. You’re probably not willing to change your company name, but you can put more effort into appearing in search results for better keywords. You should know your top 6 keywords. If you haven’t really put much thought into your keywords, you’ll get a mix of traffic of people looking for lots of things, but not really what you sell.

Figure out the top keywords your audience is searching for and make sure you use them throughout your site, especially in your blog titles and static pages. For your marketing company, that would be terms like:

  • Content marketing
  • Marketing firm
  • Marketing for small business

If you continue to work to build your presence online with those keywords, as well as blogging, you should start to move up those search results and attract people who are looking for what you’re selling.

3. You Lack Calls to Action

Now that search engines have led leads to your website, it’s your job to make them drink the koolaid. If your home page lacks any call to action, how will visitors know what you want them to do? Consider your call to action your instructions for visitors to your site. Do you want them to:

  • Buy from you?
  • Get a free quote?
  • Subscribe to your newsletter?
  • Download a free ebook?

Then let them know! Make your call to action bold, colored differently from surrounding text, and simple to follow.

Your website holds the potential to convert visitors into customers. But you’ve got to ensure you’re targeting the right people with your content and keywords, and that your site is an inviting place to shop. Then you can lower that bounce rate and increase sales!


Be Like Google: How to Build a Valuable Brand

Your company’s brand is what people say when you are not around. Customers buy from brands that they know, like and trust. If built right, your brand can be one of the most valuable assets your company owns.

Google-LogoThis past year, Google finally topped Apple for the title of the world’s most valuable brand. According to Millward Brown’s BrandZ study, Apple’s brand value diminished 20 percent to an estimated $148 billion while Google’s brand value increased 40 percent since last year to reach $159 billion. Rounding out the top five on the list of the most valuable brands are two more technology firms: IBM at $170 billion and Microsoft at $90 billion. The fifth spot is claimed by fast food giant, McDonald’s. Where is Coca-Cola? Number 6.

Including the top four most valuable brands, a total of 18 technology companies made the list accounting for $827 billion in brand value. Facebook’s brand value increased 68% to reach number 21, while Twitter and LinkedIn make their debut to the list coming in at 71 and 78 respectively.

According to financeonline.com, there are several explanations for Apple’s fall. Here is what happened and what small business owners can learn from the world’s top brands:

  1. Perfectionism can slow your company down. Apple and Google could not be more different with how they choose to roll out their products. Apple exemplifies perfection and secrecy, while Google is known for releasing beta versions of their products and embracing feedback from the crowd. Overall, Google seems to take more risk (like Google Glass and a self-driving car) and is less afraid of failure. Lesson: You will make mistakes, so fail faster. Done is better than perfect.
  2. Build your brand image carefully. Even today, the Apple brand is impossible to separate from its cofounder, Steve Jobs. Can the company keep its winning brand without its visionary leader? Pundits continue to ask questions like how much of Apple’s breakthrough products was the result of one man’s genius? Alternately, Google is seen as a team of incredibly talented people on a mission to develop the world’s most innovative ideas. Lesson: A brand image can grow more easily and sustainably if it is not be tied to one person.
  3. If you’re going to set the bar high, make sure you can reach it. For a decade, Apple redefined product categories with iTunes, the iPod, iPhone, and iPad. This is what consumers have come to expect with every new product. Its failure to launch an innovative new product to match the genius of the past has contributed to its fall. Lesson: Don’t get caught in the Innovator’s Dilemma. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Innovator%27s_Dilemma

Set the bar high for others, but be able to consistently reach it yourself.

How have you made your brand valuable?


Mondays with Mike: The Blend Strategy – Building Innovative Businesses

The difference between entrepreneurs and “normal” people is that normal folks may actually believe that it’s all been done before, that the good ideas are already taken.  Entrepreneurs know different.  We entrepreneurs believe that there’s always a fresh approach to a field or a product that can be profitable if it’s launched the right way.

One of the most effective ways to put a fresh spin on a business is by combining, or blending aspects of two different businesses.  Whether it’s as simple as combining peanut butter and jelly together in one jar, or as complex as blending drive-thru fast food service with the wedding industry to create Las Vegas’s drive-thru wedding chapels, creatively fusing two industries can give you an edge and set you apart from all of your competitors.

I’ve found two clever ways that entrepreneurs have used blending to create profitable ventures, and I’m sure there are more!

  1. Shared spaces.  Okay, this concept isn’t classic blending, but it certainly employs elements of the strategy.   The key concept of shared spaces is to place your business in proximity to other businesses so that you get a crack at their existing customers. Here’s how it works.  Grocery shoppers hit the in-store Starbucks for a $5 cup of coffee to sip while they shop.  Grocery shoppers also handle all of their banking needs at the in-store bank at the front of the grocery store.  From February to April, you can even have your taxes done in the grocery store!  My favorite example of shared spaces, though, is the Lowe’s Stocksy_txp7fd1b2b2qB5000_Small_39017hardware store near my house.  There’s a guy with a hot dog stand just as you head out of the exit, after you purchase your light fixtures, bird seed, and drywall.  He’s there 365 days a year – in fact, you can smell the sauerkraut before you get to the door.  It’s genius.  He sells more hot dogs than you could imagine – whether it’s to hungry contractors near lunchtime, or to hungry kiddos helping their parents shop for weekend projects.  Shared spaces can be a great way to get your business started.  The bonus is that your new small business lends added value to the existing store as well!
  2. Duplicating an existing method of delivery.  The Vegas drive-thru chapel fits this technique, as do drive-thru banks, pharmacies, dry cleaners, and – my personal fave – drive-thru liquor stores.  Seeing a model of service delivery that works in one business and adapting it to another can be a goldmine.  Think about Ebay – they found a way to combine online product sales with the concept of an auction, complete with all the excitement of worrying about being outbid.  Their marketplace blended online sales with garage sales and added an auctioneer.  Look around you at your local businesses and see if there’s a unique delivery method that you can adapt to suit your vision.

Entrepreneurs are some of the best out-of-the-box thinkers around, and I’m constantly amazed by the innovative blends that smart business owners develop and market to become great success stories.


How Men and Women Use Social Media Differently

Posted on by Barry Moltz

Stocksy_txp1dc7b8d3Cw4000_Small_193882Gender has always affected our buying decisions and this now extends to responding to online ads. Small businesses need to customize their social media strategies based on their type of customer to achieve the best results.

According to recent studies by Pew, Exact Target and Nielson, 56% of men who surf the web will respond to ads with coupons compared to 39% of women. Alternately, 71% of women will ‘Like’ or follow a particular brand for deals compared to only 18% of men.

How does each sex use social media differently? Survey results show that men are most likely to use it for business and dating. Specifically, 27% of men use it for business and 12% for social dating. Women use social media for staying in contact with friends, blogging, photo sharing, entertainment and finding how to information.

On social media, men are looking for quick access to brand deals and information. Therefore, they are much more likely to use coupons and scan QR codes. Survey results show that women will ignore any paid digital advertising from brands (including text ads) and instead focus on finding more meaningful informational engagement that matches their interest.

What themes resonates with men online?

  • Cars
  • Sports
  • Action
  • Sex

The themes that women most connected to are:

  • Sentimental
  • Family
  • Real life situations
  • Children
  • Pets

Both men and women interests overlap and enjoy these themes:

  • Humor
  • Value
  • Celebrity Endorsements
  • Aspirational

Men and women also use smart phones differently. Men are focused on getting news, watching video and utilizing GPS (since they never ask for directions!). Women primarily use mobile phones for texting, photo sharing and playing games.

How can a small business owner use this information? If a product is targeted at men, use action and sports themes that are more likely to resonate with them. Use video, news formats and location based marketing. If a product is primarily aimed at women, the use of family, sentimental situations photos can be effective.

These survey results should be used only as guidelines. Of course, any business or targeted customer set may vary based on age, geographic location or experience.

Does your social media marketing strategy target men and women separately?


What Color Should Your Logo Be?

Small business owners fret over what their logo looks like. They want it to be clean, cool or fancy. What they should really focus on is how it makes a customer feel since logos play a large role in their purchasing decisions. Researchers at the University of Amsterdam found that children as young as two years old could recall a logo and its product 67% of the time. By eight, 100 percent of children tested could associate the logo with the product.

???????????????????????????Brand logos are valuable property because they evoke emotions connected with buying. For the first time in the history of Interbrand’s Best Global Brands report, Apple was the top brand. Google jumped to number 2 and Coca-Cola, the brand that held the number one position for 13 years was number three. The total value of all 100 Best Global Brands was $1.5 trillion with the Google brand logo being worth over $100 billion alone.

According to a new research at Financesonline.com, colors evoke a specific emotional response from a customer. This is important since 75% of all buying decision are emotional.

Here are what specific colors mean:

Red means active, passionate, trustful, love, and intensity. Think Coca-Cola and Target. Red Bull wants customers to see their brand as intense and active.

Yellow means energy and joy. Think Ferrari, Shell and Best Buy. McDonalds wants customers to associate their brand with happiness.

Orange means creative, determined, joyful and the beach. It can stimulate mental activity. Think Fanta and Firefox. The Home Depot wants to help its customers be creative in the Do-It-Yourself market of home construction and repair.

Pink is often associated with feminine brands. It means love, warm, sexuality and nurturing. Think Barbie and T-Mobile. Oprah’s Oxygen network is aimed at women.

Blue means depth, stability, calm, trust, comfort, and reliability. Think Samsung, IBM, Intel, GE and Ford. When a customer buys from Nextiva, they know that their office communications will always be reliably delivered.

Green means relax, peaceful, hopeful and natural. Think Starbucks and BP. Heineken beer wants their customers to feel exactly this way.

Brown is associated with the Earth. It means reliability, support, dependability and grounded. Think Godiva Chocolate and M&Ms (at least the brown ones). UPS has become synonymous with this type of consistent reliability.

Black means formal, mystery, bold, luxurious and serious. Think Blackberry. Customers shop at Tiffany’s for that special occasion.

A logo should not just be “pretty or cool”. Determine what feeling do you want your brand to evoke? Choose your colors wisely.

Barry Moltz helps get small businesses unstuck. His new book, “How to Get Unstuck: 25 Ways to Get Your Business Growing Again” is now available. 


Are You a Fake?

a-penguin-imposterMany small business owners suffer from the imposter syndrome. They feel that their customers or employees will find out "who they really are" and lose confidence in their ability to run the company. This fear holds many people back from displaying who they really are at work. This becomes a problem in the transparent world of the Internet where "being human" and authentic are highly valued by customers.

Customers buy from who they believe, like, and trust. Without being authentic as a leader and a company, this will never happen and it will become impossible to build a profitable company. Here is what to do:

1. Tell the truth. This is more difficult than it first seems in small business. Most owners have good intentions, but sometimes are afraid to disclose to employees and customers what is really happening. How to be authentic: Focus on the companies strengths. Always deliver good and bad news in a timely fashion. Don't be afraid to be humble and show personal or company warts. Build a culture of openness and frequent communication. 

2. Stick to the brand. Many times, companies want to be everything to everybody. This leads to telling the customer that the company can do things that they really can't. This leads to frustrated employees, disappointed customers and an unprofitable businesses. How to be authentic: Determine the exact customer segment served and the pain solved. Get clear on what the company cares about. Stay focused on delivering outstanding results in this niche area.

3. Hire employees that want to be part of the company's culture. Too many times, owners hire a person to fit a particular job. They rush into a decision and don't understand how that person would work in the overall company culture. How to be authentic: Hire for attitude over skill. Think about how the new employee will complement the rest of the team. Have team members give feedback on prospective employees.

4. Be consistent. Too many times, the company's brand does not match it's culture. The friendly company persona contradicts the cut throat office atmosphere. The boss is sometimes an angel and other times an ogre. How to be authentic: Live the company brand. Be the same person inside and outside the office. Be the same in front of managers, staff and customers. Have no hidden agendas. Set an example by practicing whatever is preached.

Are you authentic? How do you demonstrate it? 




 
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