Posts Tagged ‘Advertising’


Mondays with Mike: 4 Marketing Fails And What You Can Learn From Them

Some marketing campaigns are more successful than others.  You might be unhappy with an ad that leaves consumers scratching their heads or that doesn’t make your product very memorable.  You may want to take a big chance – roll the dice on a new campaign that will cement your place in consumers’ minds and hearts.  As we are bombarded by more and more images, slogans, and ads, companies are having to be increasingly creative in making a lasting impression.  

 

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Be careful, though!  It’s possible not to just miss the mark, but to miss the target altogether and end up with a full-blown marketing catastrophe.  Here are a few ways in which marketing can be a huge flop – and more importantly, what you can learn from the failures of others.

  1. Unintended Consequences.  How certain was Todd Davis, CEO of Lifelock, that his company could protect the financial security and identities of its users?  Certain enough that he posted his social security number on the company’s website and even on billboards.  How big was the fail?  By last count, Davis’ identity has been stolen at least thirteen times, and to add insult to injury, the Federal Trade Commission even fined Lifelock $12 million for making false claims in its advertising.  Takeaway:  Think your ad campaign through.  Don’t set yourself up by failing to anticipate the logical outcome of your marketing strategy.
  2. Underestimated Cost.  In the early 1990s, Pepsi developed a marketing campaign designed to boost its flagging sales in the Philippines.  They printed numbers on the underside of bottle caps and ran a contest, promising to award 1 million Philippine pesos to the lucky winner with the winning number.  An error in the number selection process resulted in the wrong winning number being announced – a number that had been printed on 800,000 bottle caps.  A contest that was intended to have a $2 million in payouts ended up costing Pepsi over $10 million in legal fees and restitution.  The moral:  Run the numbers, and then run them again.  Make sure you’ve accounted for all of the costs of your campaign, even if it doesn’t go the way you’ve planned.
  3. Inability To Control Content.  Making the most of social media means that companies have to react lightning quick to comments from users who expect interaction.  The trouble, though, is that when comments are live and public, you can end up with some embarrassing or inappropriate messages on your company’s page.  Take Qantas Airlines as an example.  Despite the fact that they’d grounded their flights due to a contract dispute, they introduced a campaign inviting customers to share their dream flight experiences.  The hashtag #QantasLuxury was quickly coopted by frustrated fliers who were trying to get to a funeral or home to a pregnant partner about to deliver.  If you invite the public to participate, make sure you can control the content.
  4. Unintentionally offensive.  Motherhood – the sacred institution.  It’s associated with love, warmth, caring, and … housework?  Mr. Clean’s Mother’s Day advertisement prompted women with a catchy encouragement: “This Mother’s Day, get back to the job that really matters.”  The photo of a woman cleaning pressed all the wrong buttons with many consumers.  Make sure that the message you’re sending isn’t going to inadvertently piss your customers off.  Do a little test marketing!

It’s the splashiest, most outrageous marketing campaigns that garner the most attention.  Fortune does indeed favor the bold, but you need to ensure that your advertisements don’t end up costing you business.  Learn from the mistakes of others.

 

 

 


Mondays with Mike: The 4 Crazy Ways To Advertise With Mobile Technology

Consumers are absolutely besieged by images, messages, and impressions.  Every time we turn on our phones, computers, televisions, e-readers, or radios, we’re inundated by advertising and information.  Given the overload that we experience, it’s often the most outrageous messages that hit their mark. 

If you’re looking to boost the number of impressions you make, one of the very best ways to do it is via social media. Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and Instagram touch more users more times per day than we can really wrap our heads around.  That’s a lot of potential impressions, but you have to do something novel to really capture the attention of potential customers.  If you’re determined to make a splash, here are some ideas to get your started. 

  1. Invite users to submit videos or pics with your product or logo.  Think people won’t take the time to make and upload a video?  Think again!  Look at the thousands and thousands of ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos filling up your newsfeed on Facebook.  The videos of folks dumping ice water over their heads – sometimes in very creative ways – demonstrate the power of the novelty video.  Someone makes a video, shares it, and it spreads, increasing exponentially to reach more users every day.  The best way to adapt this photo/video idea for business is to run a contest:  Invite customers to post pics of themselves wearing a hat or t-shirt with your logo while they’re on vacation or in an unusual spot.  The photo that gets the most likes or shares wins a prize.  Think about the potential here – you’re going to be making thousands of impressions and building fans for life.  Powerful stuff.
  2. Pop-up advertising.  We become completely immune to things we see or hear day after day.  When the same old ad comes on my Pandora radio, I completely tune it out.  It’s like I don’t even hear it.  Novelty is king, and that’s why pop-up advertising is so effective.  Whether you turn your pizza shop delivery vehicle into a giant slice of pizza or whether you hire a clown who walks on five foot tall stilts to entertain folks in the parking lot on a busy Saturday, the real secret to pop-up advertising is that random people will take pics and share them with their friends.  Your little attention-getting stunt will continue to make its way around social media long after your part is finished.
  3. 2014-08-25_1635Flash mobs.  More labor intensive than some other techniques, the surprise and wonder factor here is huge.  You coordinate a number of people to perform in public, making sure you get good quality video of the event, and you post the video online.  Again, like the other social media techniques, the power isn’t in the initial views.  While the folks who happen to be on the street or mall when you perform will certainly be surprised and enjoy the event, the real numbers come when the video is shared over and over, resulting in tens, or even hundreds of thousands of impressions.
  4. Work lightning fast.  Twitter is particularly useful for brief messages that are timely and relevant to rapidly developing current events.  One of my favorite examples was the Oreo hashtag during the Superbowl when the lights in the stadium abruptly went out.  “You can still dunk in the dark” was the tagline of the ad that appeared on Twitter just seconds into the blackout.  The ad was retweeted countless times, and Oreo was declared the winner of the Marketing Superbowl.  You need a smart, witty social media guru on your payroll in order to take advantage of current events opportunities, but it can be worth every penny you pay.  Seize the moment!

Key to all of these social media strategies is the fact that by getting consumers involved with spreading the word about your brand, you’re transforming them into your biggest fans.  Social media works because everyone wants their fifteen minutes of fame, and there’s no reason while they can’t have that fifteen minutes while wearing your logo and creating millions of brand impressions. 


5 Ways to Make Money Through Text Messaging for Your Small Business

???????????????????????????????It’s nearly impossible to go anywhere without seeing people using their smartphones to text, talk, use apps, or surf the web. More than 90 percent of the U.S. population has mobile phones, and those individuals spend 19 hours per day with the device at arm’s length (some even more!). If you’re not using text messaging as part of your marketing and business development plan, you’re missing out on serious opportunity to connect with your customers and increase sales.

Text messages are one of the most-read methods of communication, with a 97 percent open rate (that’s much higher than the average email gets). And 85 percent of text messages are read within 15 minutes of receipt. This is a boon if you’re trying to get people’s attention right now. Here’s a look at how you can leverage text messages to make money for your small business.

  1. Get permission first.  You must make sure that your customers want to hear from you via text message, or you’ll risk suffering a huge backlash and potentially losing customers.
  2. Use text messaging as a relationship building tool. Like with any type of business development venture, don’t immediately start using a text messaging strategy to sell products and services. Instead texting should first be a way to build relationships with current customers and prospects. Send out useful information that customers will want, such as appointment reminders or coupons. Just remember not to send text messages too frequently or you’ll risk irritating people.
  3. Use text messaging to support existing marketing and sales efforts. One of the best ways to use text messaging is to present special offers, which lead customers to buy in the store or online. For example, if your business has a sale on a Monday, a text message can be sent Sunday afternoon to remind customers about this opportunity to shop and save.​​Starbucks will often send out text messages to customers reminding them to use their “treat receipt” (morning coffee receipt) to buy an afternoon drink at a discounted price. The “treat receipt” is an existing sales strategy, and adding the text messaging component helps to encourage customers to come back for a second purchase on the same day.
  4. Develop exclusive mobile content. You want customers to pay attention to the text messages you send. As such, don’t simply promote the same discounts and offers you send in email and your website. Create specific offers such as a 20 percent discount using a text message code. This will train the buyer not to ignore your texts.
  5. Find the right service provider. This is an important step in order to deploy a text messaging strategy for your business. There are text messaging platforms available for iPhones and Android devices that allow geo-tracking, which shows the geographic location of the mobile device holder. This is important if you plan to send text offers to customers who are near your business.

A text messaging strategy is a critical part of business development and marketing in today’s multi-channel marketing world. Remember to use texting to form relationships before going straight for the sale, and think about a strategy before sending your first message. 


Mondays with Mike: Improve Your Client Relationships With Social Media

In the olden days – you know, before Facebook – the success of a marketing campaign was often simply a measure of how much money you had to spend.  After all, we know that if you repeat something often enough, then people will believe it. 

My, how times have changed.

People consume information so differently now, that the weight of a single television commercial or magazine ad is often diluted by all of the impressions that we get from other forms of media, and that’s a huge opportunity for small businesses.  You can build your brand without investing tons of money, if you’re willing to invest a little time.  Consumers are looking for a genuine connection and a way to interact with a company, and you can give them what they want by using social media.

There are lots of serious minded folks who dismiss Facebook and Twitter as frivolous fads – wasters of time and energy.  What those folks don’t know is that their company is most likely already being discussed on social media.  Whether you run a restaurant or a carpet cleaning service, chances are good that there are online reviews of your business.  If that doesn’t scare you, it should.  The conversation is happening.  The only question is whether you want to participate and start to shape that conversation into one that presents your company in its best light.

Responding to reviews on Yelp or Trip Advisor is a great opportunity to thank happy patrons for their business, and it’s also a chance for you to see what your customers didn’t like about their experience.  If it’s appropriate, a public acknowledgement of their complaint and a promise to make it right shows that you value your customers and are invested in providing excellent service.

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Social media also gives you a chance to invite prospective customers in for a virtual visit.  You can post pictures of your daily special at the restaurant, or you can write a quick blog post about why you’ve chosen a particular brand of environmentally safe cleaners for use in your customers’ homes.  You can run silly little contests on your Facebook page, inviting folks to provide suggestions for your newest drink creation or offering a freebie for the 1000th person who likes your Facebook page.  The idea is to get your customers involved on your social media platforms.  Invite them to share pictures of your business on Instagram, and make sure you monitor all of the possible sites that might have reviews of your business.  It’s possible that you’ll luck into some great, unsolicited free advertising, but if you carefully cultivate your social media presence, you’ll end up interacting with far more consumers.

Your company’s reputation depends on your relationship with your customers, and you can manage that relationship – in part, anyway – by using the free social media tools available to you.  Whether you’re in love with Facebook or not, you’re missing out if you don’t acknowledge the powerful opportunities that it provides you.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Selling to Millennials? You Need a Loyalty Program

Stocksy_txp65da3129op6000_Small_134151If your small business doesn’t have a loyalty program—but does have Millennial customers as part of your target market—you may want to reconsider and add some type of rewards program to your marketing mix. The 2014 Loyalty Report from Bond Brand Loyalty reports that U.S. Millennials (defined as aged 20 to 34) are more likely than other age groups to participate in loyalty programs. What’s more, they’re more likely than other age groups to change their shopping behaviors based on a loyalty program, the study says.

A whopping 60 percent of Millennials would switch brands and two-thirds would change where they buy in order to get more loyalty rewards. In addition, 67 percent contend they wouldn’t be loyal to a company without a good loyalty program.

Consumers overall are enrolled in an average of 10.4 loyalty programs, and are active in about seven of those. While loyalty programs are widespread, consumers are getting slightly more unwilling to share personal information with them. Some 32 percent say they worry about divulging personal information, compared to 29 percent last year.

What works to get customers to spill their data? Offering discounts based on prior purchasing behavior, inviting customers to special events, customizing offers for them and inviting them to online communities for loyalty program members are all effective ways to get users to share their personal data. In addition, users say that when a company’s loyalty program makes them feel valued and important, they’re more likely to share personal information with that business.

However, there are some important differences in what works for Millennials as opposed to other age groups. Millennials are more likely to want to interact with your business on a mobile device. They’re also more likely to care about non-monetary rewards, such as getting recognized by their peers or being able to share their experiences with others.

Craft your loyalty rewards program to appeal to your desired customer base, whether that’s seniors who want plain old punch cards or mobile-loving Millennials who want to track everything on their smartphones. Your efforts will pay off in greater loyalty and higher sales. 


20 Words to Get Your Posts Read

The key to getting any business content read is its headline. Take a lesson from print media, articles with boring titles never get read. Here are 20 words to make sure that prospects and customers read what your company posts:

  1. Numbers:  3, 5, 7 or 10 are a clear winners. Even numbers are less popular. Every reader wants a simple step by step list to accomplish their task.
  2. Easier: They want your business to make it easier for them. They seek an easier way out or an easier way to solve their pain.
  3. Rock star: Most customers have a secret desire to be a famous rock star even if it is only in their immediate world. They will pay anyone to get there.
  4. Capture: The best word to help customers get what they desire. It denotes things that are not easy to accomplish.
  5. Killer: This is a powerful, yet controversial word. It can backfire if used in times of domestic violence.
  6. Secrets: Every customer wants to learn the secret formula that not everyone else knows so they can benefit from it.
  7. Stocksy_txp870288944a3000_Small_22647Perfection: Consumers are always striving for this ideal. They know they can’t really achieve it, but it does not stop them looking for help to get it.
  8. Quick: Customers have no time. They want something fast (see “Easy”). This can be learned from the popular fast and prepared food craze.
  9. Dangerous: Many customers lead fairly mundane lives and seek safety. They want to read about dangerous things they should avoid.
  10. Clever: Customers hope to gain an advantage by being cleverer than the next person. This is a quality that is almost universally admired.
  11. Next level: Every customer wants to go up, forward and to the next higher level. They will buy whatever can help them get there.
  12. Guarantee: This helps mitigate the risk a customer is taking in their purchase. If the results are “guaranteed”, they feel more comfortable to act.
  13. Boost: Customers want quick help to get higher. The “boost” is a popular and warm image from childhood.
  14. Latest: Many customers are addicted to the “shiny object syndrome” and always want the latest and greatest. Companies feed that desire.
  15. Mega: Americans always like things which are large. In fact, the bigger, the better. Many believe that a higher quantity means increased value.
  16. Absolutely: A better way of saying “the best”. It leaves no room for doubt.
  17. Ridiculous: Customers like to hear about the “crazy” so they can pass along these stories to friends and associates.
  18. VIP: Every customer wants to be part of something that not all people can join. It makes them feel special.
  19. Limited time: Customers will act if they believe there is scarcity.
  20. Worst: Unfortunately, people are more attracted to the negative, than the positive. This is the basis of the popularity of every reality TV show.

What are your best headline words?


Work Your Biz Wednesday: Market on Social Media

Build a social media empire for your business in just one hour per day! Learn how with these 5 tips from Melinda Emerson, The Small Biz Lady.


Mondays with Mike: The 7 Techniques for Cutting Costs with Zero Downside

coin-jar (1)The start of a fresh year is the perfect opportunity to take a look at your business and assess the ways in which you can improve your bottom line.  Cutting costs can yield benefits, but it’s important to make changes that don’t end up stifling growth or affecting your ability to bring in revenue.  Let the notion of productivity transfer – achieving the same results with alternative resources – guide your steps.

  1. Pool your resources.  Consult with other small businesses in your area to determine which products you all need to run your businesses and commit to working with one supplier exclusively for a period of time in exchange for a discount.  Your supplier will be thrilled to have guaranteed revenue, and you’ll see real savings.
  2. Hire contractors.  If you’re paying full-time staff to sit around and wait for work, then you’re not using your payroll dollars as effectively as you could be.  Find contractors, pay them a higher hourly rate for their expertise, and you and your staff will be more efficient. 
  3. Free advertising.  Ever see billboards that advertise for a business that’s closed up shop?  Call the phone company and have the phone number redirected to you. After you inform the callers that you’re ready to supply the goods or services to satisfy their needs, you have instant prospects! Why pay for advertising when you can get it for free?
  4. Cut phone costs.  So many businesses bleed enormous sums of money in their phone plans.  Check out the free and nearly free options that you have. Nextiva is one example that lets you actually improve the number and quality of services you enjoy, while slashing costs at the same time.
  5. Assess your office space.  Look at what you pay to rent your office space and take a hard look at your options.  If your staff can operate from home, you can eliminate your office rent altogether.  If your business requires a physical office, look around for other businesses that may be renting more space than they need and see if they’re willing to share some space for a reduced cost.  Also, keep in mind that landlords with vacant space may be willing to renegotiate rent if they’re anxious about keeping you as a tenant.
  6. Train your own talent.  Experienced staff is expensive, no two ways about it.  If you have positions that you can fill with inexperienced folks with great potential, you can train your staff in-house.  Accepting applications from inexperienced folks also lets you take a look at interns and people with disabilities – folks who might have trouble gaining experience, but can be gems once they’re properly trained.  Think outside your typical talent pool.
  7. Get your staff involved.  Sit down with your employees and lay it out for them:  explain that you want their expertise and suggestions for how to cut costs and make the company healthier.  You’ll get ideas that would never have occurred to you, and your staff – rather than worrying about their job security – feels like a vital part of a team.

The overall measure of success for cost cutting measures is the bottom line, and it’s important to take the time to ensure that you’re making changes that result in a leaner, healthier, and more efficient company.   


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: How to Encourage Online Reviews

Have you ever been in the mood for a certain type of food and hopped on Yelp to look for a new restaurant to try? Then you know that online ratings and reviews from customers are key to driving new customers to your business and growing your sales. The more reviews you have, the more trustworthy your business will appear to be. But too many small business owners aren’t doing all they can to get customers to post online reviews. As a result, they have few or no reviews and get passed over in favor of businesses with more feedback.

How can you encourage customers to leave reviews? Encourage is the key word here, because actively soliciting or requesting reviews is frowned on by review sites, and providing incentives such as discounts or freebies in exchange for reviews can get you in trouble. Try these steps instead:

  1. Give them a sign. Posting signage in your store, restaurant or office is a simple and subtle way to remind customers that your business is on review sites and that you’d love a review. For example, Yelp has downloadable “Find us on Yelp” banners you can print out as signage for your store window or point-of-sale counter.
  2. Provide postsale reminders. Your store receipts or restaurant checks could say: “Like us? Review us on [list the review sites where you have a presence].” An ecommerce company can send follow-up emails after the sale to make sure the customer was satisfied and include a reminder that your business is on review sites.
  3. Spread the word. Put icons for the review sites where you have a presence in your print marketing materials, on your website (you can use the downloadable Yelp banners there), in your email signature and anywhere else you can think of.
  4. Make it easy. Everyone’s more inclined to write a review if it’s not a big hassle, so if your site says, “Like us? Review us on Yelp,” make sure there’s a clickable link so they can do so in a minute.

Whatever you do about online reviews, there’s one big “don’t:” Don’t fake them or have friends and family write them because you’re worried you don’t have enough. Use the tips above to grow your online review status organically. 

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