Archive for the ‘Work Your Biz Wednesday’ Category

4 Must-Have Keyword Research Tools for Your Business

7-1 Keywords for website smallKeywords are instrumental in helping people find your website. Every time someone searches for a keyword that relates to your brand, you want them to find your site, nestled toward the top of search results. If that’s not the case, you need to invest serious time in researching the right keywords and adding them to your website. These tools make it easy to do.

1. Google Keyword Planner

This tool is part of Google AdWords, but you don’t have to buy ads to use it. Google Keyword Planner lets you search for keyword ideas as well as see how many people are searching for a given keyword.

Go one step further: Once you find a handful of keywords that you think accurately describe your products or services, incorporate them on each page of your website. But only use one or two per page! Using more may trigger Google to push you down search results rather than up, as the search mogul is cracking down on black hat SEO strategies.

2. WordTracker

Google’s Keyword Planner is free to use, but WordTracker is a subscription-based keyword research tool. It also provides relevant and related keywords, and can help you find ones you wouldn’t otherwise have thought of. You get more keywords than with Keyword Planner, and you can access your searches by logging into your account, rather than dealing with clunky spreadsheets of data.

Go one step further: Check out WordTracker Academy for great resources to help sharpen your SEO skills and stay on top of the latest updates. They also offer some great reports and downloads.

3. Twitter Hashtags

Just like with Google Trends, hashtags on Twitter can let you know what people are buzzing about right now.

Go one step further: Check the lefthand sidebar on your Twitter homepage to see the hashtags that are being used heavily at any given moment. Use them in your own social updates, or use the topics as blog fodder.


UberSuggest is one of the best free Keyword suggestion tools with an easy to use graphical component. Übersuggest is one suggestion tool that makes good use of different suggest services. You can get suggestions from regular web searches or from search verticals like shopping, news or video. Ubersuggest can be very useful for quick keyword based post ideas.

Bonus tool: Google Trends

While not a keyword research tool per se, Google Trends shows you what’s hot right now. This is especially useful if you’re looking for blog topics. Ride on the tails of trending searches or news, and you’re more likely to see more readers for that particular post.

Go one step further: Subscribe to Trends to get emailed whenever topics you care about pop up as trending.

Keywords change over time, so make sure you constantly stay on top of the best keywords to promote your small business website.  

Using Case Studies to Grow Your Business

One of the ways to build credibility for your business is to share information about your company’s products and services from satisfied customers. Your ability to get a foot in the door with prospective customers depends in part upon how well you tell your company’s story. If you are a service business, you can’t talk about a tangible product. But what you can do is develop case studies to do that help you illustrate the results you deliver for your existing customers.

case study is in-depth profile of work you've done. This is typically written to highlight the work you’ve done on a high-profile project or client. This summary report can then be used as a one-pager in a marketing kit or on your company’s website. Here are the elements to include on a compelling case study.

Name of Client and Type of Service

Always include the name of the client you plan to profile (with their permission, of course), and select a business that will resonate with your target audience. The goal of writing case studies is to ensure that your ideal customer will hire you after reading the case study.

Also include the type of service you provided. For example, if you provided social media consulting or online marketing, include that as a sub-heading after you list the client’s name in the title. Since this will live on your website, you'll need to ask the company’s permission before publishing.  

Purpose of the Project

This is where you write about the problem the client was facing, and why you were hired to solve it. For example, was the purpose of the project to raise awareness of their company or brand? Was it to build brand awareness, generate sales or increase their online traffic?

Execution Brief

Here is where you illustrate how you solved the problem for the client. Describe in detail all the services you provided, and highlight why you chose certain strategies over others. Do not simply say you increased the number of newsletter subscribers. Be specific and note HOW you increased the subscribers.

Since this section of the case study can be long, don’t be afraid to break up the text into sections with bolded headers, or use bullets and numbers.

Share Results for the Clients

Use real numbers to illustrate the successful work you did. Don’t just say, “We doubled traffic to the website.” Instead list the before and after numbers or percentages and consider displaying those figures in charts and graphs. Using screenshots of Google Analytics information are great additions if that reflects the work you did. This section is a great way to use visuals to display the information.

Client Endorsements

One of the most effective ways to sell your products and services is with customer testimonials. Potential customers are really not that interested in your passion or belief that your work produces amazing results. Let your customers do that bragging for you. Include a few testimonials from the satisfied clients in your case study. Ask the customer to write the testimonial in a way that highlights tangible results and benefits. These words are a great way to close the case study with praise for the work you conducted. 

The addition of case studies to your website will help you tell your business story, highlight the services you provide, and illustrate results at the same time. Try if you can to get testimonials in video as well, to add to your website as well.

How to Under Promise and Over Deliver to Your Customers

6-17 over deliver smallHow well you connect with your customers through your products, services, and support will determine whether they come back to you to buy again and again. But even if you sell the most amazing products ever, there’s still room to improve your customer service. One strategy is to underpromise and overdeliver. What do I mean by that?

Some may tell you to think of underpromising what you can give a customer as an “in case of emergency” cushion for worst-case scenarios, but it’s better to plan for success than for failure. By promising one thing (5-day delivery, for example) and beating expectations (2-day delivery) you'll surprise and delight your customers. And that will keep them coming back. Here are four ways to ensure that your customers are constantly enchanted with your service, plus one freebie tip for the customer who cannot be satisfied.

When you thank your customer for her business, ask her for feedback.

One way to know how to overdeliver to your customers and also gain valuable insight is to ask your customers what they want. Institute an outreach program that connects with customers within 7-10 days after the transaction is complete. Ask your customer to provide specific ratings and input on a few specific topics. Then look at trends. If you constantly hear that your product isn’t well-packaged and sometimes gets damaged in shipping, that’s something you can take direct action to improve.

Work smarter with Customer Relationship Management Software (CRM).

If you’ve ever called a customer service line, been transferred, and then had to re-explain your situation, you no doubt were frustrated that the company didn’t keep better records on your past interactions with it. Delight your customers by storing detailed records on past transactions and calls with CRMUsing CRM, anyone with access to the software can become an expert in your customer’s history quickly and painlessly and instantly improve your customer’s experience.

When your customer completes a transaction, surprise her with a gesture.

There are many ways to acknowledge your appreciation for your customer’s business. You might send a handwritten thank you note for doing business with you — in this day and age, handwritten notes carry a lot more significance than a canned email. You may offer a small discount if she purchases again within a short time frame. It is important to let your customer know that her business is important to you and that you value it — the incentive or gift is just the icing on top.

If your customer has a problem, find out what the problem is and solve it.

If your business is reviewed on yelp or any review site, you need to stay on top of anything unhappy customers are saying. Make it your mission to solve problems for your customers. In the event that a customer is unhappy with your product or service, make it right immediately. It's not worth them telling their story to 10 more people, is it? Keep that old adage, “the customer is always right” at the center of your actions, and go above and beyond in not only remedying the situation, but making her a glowing fan of your business.

Freebie: So what, if your customer’s demands are unreasonable, Can you say ‘no.’ Yes, you can!

Every now and again you may run into a customer whose demands are unreasonable and who refuses to be pacified with your customer service efforts. While you may be tempted to appease this customer’s demands, it is better to put your energy toward your customers who do appreciate your efforts. Sometimes you may have to tell these challenging customers, “I'm sorry, I couldn't possible do that.” Just say No, and move on, as there is little you can do salvage this type of customer relationship. Save your energy and focus for your rational customers.

7 Things Small Businesses Do To Lose Online Customers

6-10 online shopping smallRunning a small business isn’t easy. Finding and keeping customers is even more difficult. If you don’t make it really simple to buy from you online, shoppers will go elsewhere for their next purchase. There are specific bad behaviors to avoid with the shopping experience on your website.

Here are seven things small businesses do to lose online customers.

1. You Have Confusing Information on Your Site.

As an entrepreneur, time is often your most precious commodity. If you don’t regularly review what’s on your website, you might be turning away potential customers with misinformation or simply old data.

If your newest blog post, for example, was written over a year ago, that’s a turnoff. If your products don’t have a sales page or enough detail to help shoppers make an informed decision about buying them, they won’t.


Periodically review all your web copy. Update it on an annual basis at minimum, and make sure it’s always accurate.

2.  No Contact Information.

Spam is a definite concern when posting your email address online, but there are alternatives that will make it easy for customers to reach you via email while keeping your inbox spam-free. Instead of burying your email address on a never-visited page, post a phone number and set up a contact form for customers to use to reach you.

Use FAQ page to help answer many of the questions people have before they hit submit on that contact form. Being helpful is always good customer service!


Ensure your contact information is clear and easy to locate. Offer multiple ways for customers to contact you (email, chat, phone, social media).

3.   You Don’t Answer Email in a Timely Manner.

Have you even sent an email trying to get help and no one every got back to you? Sure you have, but don't have that happening in your business. Don't set up an email account no one checks. Time is money when people are shopping online.

It might have been acceptable for you to respond to a customer’s email within 24-48 hours several years ago, but now every minute counts in your response time. As in: the sooner, the better. Taking even a day could lose you serious business.


If your inbox is overflowing, consider hiring a customer service rep or social media virtual assistant to help field some of those emails.

4.  You Use Social Media Inconsistently.

Social media can be a game changer for small business owners…but only if you use it regularly. If you aren’t making an effort to update your profiles at least once a day, potential customers will not know you exist. A steady stream of fresh content, on the other hand, can pique people’s interest and lead them back to your website, which is your best opportunity to generate a sale. 


Focus on only one social media site to engage prospect customers. Update your social media account daily. Dedicate a few minutes each day to the effort.

5.   You Don’t Engage with Potential Customers with Email.

You need to make sure you have at least three ways to capture a potential customers email address when they come to your site, so even if they don't buy that day you can nurture the relationship. Use email to building your brand to attract future customers, share helpful information to a build a like, know and trust relationship with your prospects.


Use email marketing to engage potential customers by demonstrating your ability to anticipate their needs, and offer help.                                                                                            

6.  You Share Too Many Promotional Updates on Social.

One of the best ways to create a relationship with a potential customer is to provide assistanceOf course, you want to bolster your connection with your audience, but it is critical to provide value first especially in social media. Don't start selling relentlessly as soon as you start using social media, Instead, share informational tidbits in the guise of links, tweets and conversations to build community with potential customers. Make it about them and not about you.


Use the 4:1 ratio. For every four useful, informational updates, post one promotional one.

5 Tips for Picking the Right Business Partner

Having the perfect business partner can help you take your business to another level even faster than you could take it on your own. Not only will you have someone to bounce ideas off of, but you can also have someone whose skill sets complement your own, making you a well-rounded team. But just like any relationship, you need to date first and test the relationship, so that you don't make an expensive mistake. Breaking up a business partnership is a major distraction, so you must choose well.

Here’s how to make sure the person you pick is right for your business.

1. Pick Your Partner Carefully.

Just like you wouldn’t marry someone you barely know, it’s important that you get to know the person you want to run a business with. In other words: date before you get married in business.

How can you do that? Work on a few projects together before joining forces in business. See how you work together. Do you flow well, or do you butt heads? Do you enjoy working together?

It’s also a good idea to do a background check to know who you're getting in business with. 

2. Get an Entrepreneur's Prenup.

Even if you trust your new partner implicitly, it’s still a good idea to hire a lawyer to develop a formal partnership agreement. Make sure it addresses how money will be managed and when net profits will be shared, as well as how hiring decisions will be made, and spells out each of your roles and responsibilities. Make sure to clarify terms on exits, buyouts, death, and divorce.

Money can ruin a good partnership. Have clear policies drawn up on how money is handled, including vendor payments, reimbursements, cash withdrawals, etc. Having this document can help you if things go south and you need legal proof of your original agreement. If you agree to change the partnership agreement, legally document the change. 

3. Keep it Business.

Unless you’re married to your business partner, your relationship will do better if you focus on business and keep your ego in check. Never make decisions based on emotions, and do take your partner’s opinion into consideration. Schedule meetings to rtegularly review your financial statements together. Be open with information and clear with communication.

4. Don't Be a Credit Hog.

There is no "I" in team. Successful partnerships can be ruined when one partner wants to take credit for everything. If your partner has come up with a great idea, pat him or her on the back and make sure credit is given where it’s due. It takes teamwork to make the dream work.  If one of you dominates the relationship, the business partnership won’t last long.

5. Value a Good Partnership.

If you have a good partner and the business is successful, celebrate this. That way both will thrive. Always make sure to make decisions in the best interest of the business and not your personal self interest. Just like in any relationship it will take time and effort on your part to develop trust and keep balance in the partnership.  

Understand the value of that partnership and make concessions for the good of the partnership. Remember: this isn’t just your business anymore. You share it with someone else, and everything you do should take that into consideration.

The Difference Between Being an Entrepreneur and a Franchisee

5-27 comparing smallIf you’re planning to become your own boss, one option you might want to consider is becoming a franchisee. In a franchise everything’s already laid out for you in terms of the products you’ll sell and the marketing plan. Many people prefer becoming a franchisee over starting a business from scratch. Still, there are several differences between being an entrepreneur and being a franchise owner that you should be aware of.

1. There’s Less Risk with Franchises (But Still Risk)

Many franchisees are attracted to the fact that they’re buying into a proven business. After all, there are thousands of burger franchises across the country. People are already familiar with the brand, so you don’t have to work to establish it on your own.

Still, it’s important that you know that there are risks with running a franchise. No business is guaranteed, and it will be susceptible to all the same threats as any other business, including recessions, competition, and location (a bad location for your franchise can kill the business).

2. You Have to Follow the Rules as a Franchisee

While technically, yes, you are a small business owner as a franchisee, you essentially sign up to have a master, your franchisor, who will tell you exactly how to run your business. You will sign a contract agreeing to do business the franchise’s way, and there may be penalties if you don’t.

You can’t, for example, change the brand logo, or add new products the menu. The franchise may provide you with marketing materials (though you may have some freedom in how you market locally through newspaper ads, events, and social media).

3. Being a Franchisee is Expensive

Becoming a franchisee involves paying a franchise fee to the company. This is essentially your buy-in fee to have the right to use the brand’s name and products. But you’ll also probably pay a monthly royalty fee based on your sales. When you start your own business, you pay for start-up expenses — like your website, marketing services, inventory, uniforms, etc. — as they come up, and you’re beholden to no one over the long-term.

4. An Entrepreneur Has More Creative License

Because franchisees are limited in the creative decisions they can make, many who want to color outside the lines prefer to start their own business. That way, they can set up exactly how the business will operate, what they’ll sell, and how they’ll market it. If you feel stifled by other people’s rules, franchising might not be for you.

It’s important to understand the difference between starting your own business and buying a franchise. Based on your personality and preferences either one could work for you.

3 Keys to Writing a Powerful Mission Statement

5-20 writing a mission statement smallEstablishing your identity as a small business is a challenge. At first, you may be tempted to chase every dollar you think you can get in the attempt to bring in revenue, but the fact is that if you try to appeal to everyone, you will end up appealing to no one. It is important to hone and identify your core audience as part of your business plan. In doing so, you have laid the foundation for writing your mission statement.

While there are many examples of mission statements that are so grandiose, they are almost a joke, a good mission statement clearly communicates a business's services, the type of projects in which the firm specializes, and unique values offered. For example, as the SmallBizLady, my mission is to end small business failure. It sounds simple, but it is easy to get off track. In order to write a potent mission statement, here are three considerations to get you off to the right start.

1. Give Yourself Sufficient Time to Write.

Mission statements are deceptively simple. They usually consist of a one to three sentences that provide an overview of the business and its goals. However, a good mission statement will also provide a view into the essence of what sets your small business apart from others.

Identifying and communicating your core principle may be challenging. You’ll need to write several versions and give yourself time to edit them into one cohesive statement. It is best if you allow yourself several writing sessions over a few days in order to convey it in a direct and meaningful way.

2. Communicate What Makes Your Small Business Unique.

Many a mission statement has been written on the bones of another more established company's hard work. You may be tempted to take the easy way out and "borrow" a phrase or even direct quotes from a firm you admire. It’s fine to get inspiration from other companies’ mission statements, but yours should be unique to your brand.

3. Use This as an Opportunity to Further Refine Your Business's Core Values.

Not all of us enjoy writing or even think that we can write well. However, this mindset will sap of you of your strength and undermine your confidence. At its core, writing is a powerful form of communication, and strong communication is a central tenet of doing business. It’s all about what you want to be known for.

The exercise of writing your mission statement strengthens your ability to communicate in a compelling manner. It is vital to push yourself to do this significant work in a thoughtful and conscientious way. You might even, through the act of writing, uncover core values you hadn’t elaborated on before.

Your mission statement is the cornerstone of your marketing efforts. It provides clarity and focus on the essence of your business. When you put substantial effort into the creation of this document, you create a steady foundation that helps you move forward with more vigor and determination.

Why You Can Never Stop Learning in Your Small Business

Colleagues working on a creative project in a startup office laughing at funny jokeContinuous learning is critical for entrepreneurs. As much as you may or may not have enjoyed school back in the day, the fact of the matter is that entrepreneurs cannot afford to stop learning. Staying sharp and on top of what’s happening in your industry is critical to long term sustainability.  You also need to keep an eye what your competitors are up to. Still, it takes hard work to continually learn what you need to know. Here’s why you can never stop learning.

Learning From Peers is Key

As a business owner you need to make sure you surround yourself with others who are doing even bigger things than you. Iron sharpens iron. Join a mastermind group in your industry, so consider Vistage or even WPO (women presidents organization) to develop a peer group that you can learn from. Building personal relationships and learning new concepts and ideas does amazing things for your mind.

My learning challenge for you: Find a peer-to-peer business organization to join.

Go Back to School

No I don’t mean MBA school, but I do mean sign up for 6 week business plan or negotiation course. Continued learning helps you set forth with awareness toward broader horizons. Once you see that anything is possible, you can expand your goals and do even more with your business.

My learning challenge for you: Try a free class on a challenging subject via It doesn’t even have to be business-related, and you might be surprised how learning about art or nutrition, for example, can expand your brain in other areas.

Learning Keeps you Growing

It may be tempting to think you’ve seen or heard it all, but you close yourself off to experiencing new things when you embrace this attitude. It may feel scary to admit to gaps in your knowledge or limits in your experience, but you can’t grow beyond them until you recognize them.

The act of learning activates our growth. Your learning can be formal or informal, but ideally a blend of both will propel you to new heights, both personally and professionally.

My learning challenge for you: Make a list of areas you’re weak in, then bone up on them. Learn how to use social media. Figure out how to unclog your own pipes.

Learning Enables You to Learn from Mistakes

We make mistakes in every aspect of our lives, entrepreneurship included. What you do with those mistakes is where your future success is determined. Be embarrassed of your error and shut off from the lesson it teaches, and you don’t benefit. On the other hand, learning from the mistake and changing your path for the better makes you a smarter business owner.

Mistakes aren’t mistakes if you walk away with a lesson learned. Make a point of assessing every situation and gleaning what you can from it.

My learning challenge for you: Consider mistakes you’ve made in the recent past. Did you learn from them, or do you continue to make the same errors over and over? Consider how you can break that pattern.

6 Ways to Renew and Revitalize Your Business Relationships

Business team having fun on coffee breakPeople do business with people they like, know and trust. So it’s really all about the relationship that determines whether or not you get the opportunity to even pitch for the business.  But when is that last time you evaluated your relationships. Joleen Jaworkski, President of Business Clubs America (BCA) of Philadelphia, inspired me to expand upon her six tips for making the most of your business relationships.  Here’s my take on the 6 ways to renew and revitalize your business relationships.

1. Treat Relationships like an Investment

Just as important as the money you invest back into your company is the time and energy you invest in your business relationships. Even when you’re swamped, you’ve got to put time in to check on your customers and contacts and see how you can move the relationship forward.

If it’s been a while since you caught up with some of your key connections, make an effort this month to email, call, or have coffee with each one. While your goal isn’t to sell, you never know where this effort will take you.

2. Be More Understanding and Accepting

Just like with married couples, business relationships undergo their own ebb and flow. Realize that if a client snaps at you, it’s probably not really about you; don’t take it personally. Also, have a grain of patience in your interactions. If, for example, a long-standing customer tells you she’s having some financial issues that are keeping her from paying you, be understanding and offer her a payment plan that will help her get back on track. She’ll appreciate you being so accommodating. The best relationships are made in tough times.

3. Be Present

Raise your hand if you’ve ever been in a meeting with someone who keeps checking his phone or email…or even accepts a call while you’re talking! It’s the worst, and it makes you feel like that person doesn’t value your time.

Don’t be that guy. Put all your attention on the person in front of you, and really hear what they’re saying. Don’t interrupt them with what you think they want to hear; you might be wrong and offend them.

4. Go Out of Your Way to Reconnect

If you are flying to a city to attend a conference or see another client, make a lunch, dinner, a drinks appointment to check in on a current or old client. You often don’t have to go far out of your way to show a contact that you’re thinking of her. You can also email an article that you think a client would like. Send a birthday card. Pick up the phone just to say hi. These little efforts can have a pretty big impact to the recipient of your attention.

5. Be Authentic

I thrive on being myself as the SmallBizLady. I’m nothing if not authentic, and people seem to appreciate my honesty in who I am. No one wants you to be something you’re not; they’ll appreciate you, warts and all. You’ll be surprised by how much you have in common with another professional single mom or dad that travels a lot. So see yourself how others see you, strengths and weaknesses included. Then be that person in every interaction you have.

6. Be Generous

Always look for a way you can serve your customers, even if it does directly put money in your pocket. I often introduce my clients to each other. Even if you hope that your business relationships blossom into sales, that’s not your aim in revitalizing those relationships. Put your focus on giving: giving your time, your energy, your advice, your referrals.

The effort you put into nurturing your business relationships will come back to you tenfold, so keep the energy flowing.

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