Archive for the ‘Business’ Category


Ten Phrases Successful People Use Daily

Man Holding a Sign with an Optimist Message"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world."- Buddha

The hit book, "The Secret" had one central message; we become what we think about. This same thing was said by Earl Nightingale years earlier in his classic "The Strangest Secret".

I am not suggesting to only think positive thoughts and block out any negativity. I am not talking about surrounding yourself with daily positive aphorisms. The key is what you focus your daily thoughts on. A golfer that thinks they will hit the ball in the sand trap inevitably will most of the time. A team playing not to lose will ultimately lose.

People who are successful say the following phrases that spur them to take action: 

1. I can do this.

It all starts with believing in yourself. People are successful because they are confident in their own abilities. This confidence comes from inside out. When faced with something scary or challenging, this is what they say. This gets them to start which is typically the most difficult part.

2. Ill do it!

People stand out by taking on a challenge no one else is willing to do. It can be small and simple like staying late or taking out the company trash. It can be volunteering on the weekend. While everyone else is asking “why?”, ask “why not?”  Be open to always saying "yes" rather than immediately "no".

3. Thats an awesome job.

Make others feel admired and appreciated by recognizing their success. People will enjoy being around you and that will make you feel good about yourself.

4. I can take at least one small step forward today

Running a small business is overwhelming and achieving goals can be a long term journey. Uncertainty on this path stops many people from even trying. All great success is a series of small steps. Learn the result of your single action and then take an additional step; and then take another.

5. “I’m really listening.”

Successful people know when to say these words. Stephen R. Covey, author of "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People'', writes “most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Successful people listen to understand and in that moment, do not worry about how they will sound when they reply.

6. “I was wrong.”

Successful people always admit this. When they are wrong, they say so. Surprisingly in this process, you will not lose respect or credibility, but gain it.

7. “Done is better than perfect.”

Tech giants Google and Microsoft release beta versions of their products to consumers knowing the products aren’t perfect, and that’s ok. What matters to them is getting the products out in the world so they can learn what needs to be improved.

9. “Can you show me?”

Successful people know that they don’t know everything. That’s why they surround themselves with people who are smarter than them. Successful people can be a follower and a leader in the business world.

10. “I don’t have to be the smartest; I just need to work the hardest.”

Successful people know that if they work hard, they increase their chances of success. They realize that the key to being successful is not just skill, but the willingness to do whatever is necessary to be the best.

Which ones do you use to keep you on the path of success?


How to Ensure that Email Doesn’t Suck the Life Out of Your Business

4-10 to many emails smallRemember when email was fun?  We used to delight in hearing those three little words, “You’ve got mail”.  But nowadays, email has become one of the biggest time sucks in business.

Unless you hone your habits, email (and texting, for that matter) can consume countless hours of your business day. Here are four habits that can help you retain control of your inbox and focus more time growing your business.

1. Follow the Touch Once Rule

This rule dates back to the olden days, when the U.S. Postal Service delivered mountains of envelopes every day. The key to efficiency was to open the envelope, look at the contents, and then immediately take action. The junk mail went into the recycling bin, while the important things either got passed on to someone else or, at the very least, into the to-do bin for immediate action.

Email is no different, except that you don’t have to deal with envelopes. If a message requires action, take that action right now, forward it to the proper person or put it on your electronic calendar or to-do list. Everything else goes into your email trash bin.

2. Make “Safe” Unsubscribe Your Best Friend

This recommendation comes with a warning: done incorrectly, you could actually become buried in spam, when it only came up to your knees before you started unsubscribing. Many spammers initially take a guess at your email address. Once your unsubscribe message confirms that address, they pass it along to other spammers.

Still, using the unsubscribe link in a message from a reputable business can substantially cut down the number of email messages that you receive every day. For the rest of them, just mark them as spam to get them out of your inbox and into the junk mail folder, where they belong.

3. Stay True to Your Own Schedule

As a small business owner, you have to tread a fine line between remaining committed to your daily schedule and being responsive to customer needs. But you’re not an emergency room doctor — even business crises can wait an hour or two before gaining your time and attention.

Some people absolutely want to know first thing in the morning if anything requires immediate attention. If your curiosity is so strong that it prevents you from meeting your obligations, you may need to take a look before you start your day. Most people become more efficient, however, when they hold off on the email until later in the day.

Regardless of when you take that first peek, further email activity should be scheduled into your day. Your planned activities are just as important (probably more so) than constantly checking the mail. Limit the number of times that you check email to avoid interrupting other scheduled work. And you probably should turn off the audio and visual email notifications to avoid temptation.

4. Recognize that Not Every Message Requires a Reply

Every conversation has to end at some point and you don’t always have to get the last word. Once the back-and-forth stops being productive, it has gone on too long. So, when customer messages tell you that the problem is solved — or just say “thank you,” maybe they’ll be even more appreciative if you do not respond.

There are civil ways to stop the madness. For example, if you need to keep someone informed, just tell them that your message is for information only and no response is necessary. And if you use an auto-responder that replies to all incoming email, make sure that it politely states that you will respond only when a response is required.

While good email habits are a must, do not waste time trying to achieve perfection (aka achieving “inbox zero”). Even with good email habits, you’ll probably never completely empty your inbox — the cyber world just doesn’t work that way. Your true goal should be to avoid losing important communications while gaining back valuable time. With any luck, your email recipients will follow your example until good email habits abound across the world.


Doing Away With Customer Service Scripts

4-3 no script smallCustomers today are looking for genuine customer service, for the authentic customer experience of one human being assisting another. So it’s time, in most business contexts, to do away with word-for-word scripts while retaining a “punch list” of points that need to be covered in the course of a customer conversation. (Life-and-death settings such as healthcare and pharmaceutical delivery are important exceptions to this rule, as are interactions with privacy or security implications.)

For example, let's look at Drybar, the blow-dry-and-style salon phenomenon that has transformed the hair care landscape in just a couple of years. The Drybar customer experience is extraordinarily well thought out, made up of hundreds of carefully created touchpoints that make the experience memorable for its customers.

And it all happens without a script. At no point in its operation, explains cofounder Michael Landau, does Drybar “train to a script, though in our contact center we give [agents] a lot of prompts they should hit on the phone—to ask about [the customer’s] hair length and other such details,” because checking in about these details directly improves the experience once the customer arrives at Drybar. “Because our growth has been so fast”—when I first became aware of Drybar in 2010, it had four shops, all in Southern California; as of this writing it’s up to nearly 40 salons across the U.S., with London coming soon—“we think a lot about how, as we grow, we will manage to convey ­to customers and to employees that they are part of a business with the spirit of a smaller, more flexible company.” The refusal to script allows Drybar to maintain this flexible, genuine feeling in two ways: It provides a less stilted experience, and it builds more empowered and flexible employees to serve customers, thanks to the leeway that Drybar is providing these employees.

Drybar isn’t providing or enforcing a script, but its leaders have laid out guidelines that its contact center employees need to heed to ensure a successful booking and blowout session, in other words a carefully plotted framework for ensuring their customers are properly cared for. While training and monitoring are needed to ensure these intakes are executed properly, this isn’t scripting.

And it couldn’t be successfully scripted because high-quality service requires employees to tailor their approach to the quirks of a particular customer in a given context. Scripting, on the other hand, is “dependent on your customer following a script himself!” as contact-center expert Colin Taylor puts it; it only works if customers behave in an expected pattern to which you can respond with a predetermined line. But customer concerns come in infinite varieties, with infinite moods, paces and nuances. So instead of training to a script, the best thing an organization can do is teach its people to deal with situations, both good and difficult. Give them the tools to recognize behaviors and respond appropriately and effectively.

Or as Doug Carr of FRHI Hotels & Resorts (Fairmont, Raffles and Swissotel are their brands) puts it, “The things that matter can’t be scripted. You can build scenarios for your staff, but you need to couple this with encouragement and training for your staff on how to read the customer, and then doing what’s right and what’s appropriate.”

Sara Kearney of Hyatt puts it like this: “It takes an awful lot of practice to come across as completely unscripted.” Kearney continues: “We don’t script [at Hyatt’s innovative new luxury brand, Andaz], but we do an awful lot of role plays and dress rehearsals to help people understand their role in bringing the brand experience to life.”

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Departing from formula isn’t easy. ("Easy" is prescribing specific words for an unempowered employee to read.) But the results are worth it, and the impact will be clear in the flexible, nuanced, genuine brand of service you offer.


How to Organize Your Business to Hire Your First Employee

"Staff Wanted" SignFrom your very first hire, you want to make sure you are attracting the kind of employees who will be an asset to your company. You want that first employee to be a hard-working, conscientious individual that you won’t break the bank to hire. But it goes deeper than that. Hiring your first employee requires plenty of planning and reflection to understand your staffing needs and your management style. Your first staff could be the freelancers you need to the full-time admin you need to offload some of your backend tasks.

Start with the Tasks You Need Help With

Before you write the job description that will help you attract the right people, start by simply brainstorming about the tasks you need help with the most. Initially, the list may be helter-skelter, with some admin tasks, some marketing, some finance, and so on. But as you complete the list, start to sort them into categories so you can determine what type of role you need to hire for. Then prioritize those job tasks so you can tackle the most important ones with your first hire.

It’s helpful to divide this list into the following categories. Each job description you put together will likely include some of each:

  • Critical tasks
  • Routine tasks
  • Occasional tasks

Consider Your Hiring Options

Full-time isn’t your only option here, and if your budget is small, it might be further down the road. You can also consider the following:

Part-Time Employee

A part-time staff member typically works 15-30 hours a week, and you aren’t required to pay health benefits for them, typically.  The perk to part-time is that you can adjust worker schedules to reflect the needs of your business. The downside is fewer people are looking for part-time roles.

Temporary Workers

Usually you hire a temp worker through an agency. They’re ideal if you need help for a few weeks or months, as you can let them go when your busy season is over. Another advantage of this option is if you don't like the worker, you can call and get another one.

Contractors

Working with freelancers or 1099 employees can help with short-term needs, such as getting your website designed or handling your virtual admin needs. You don’t pay social security or payroll taxes for contractors. One perk is that you can test out contractors to see how you like them, and then hire them full-time if they are an asset to your business.

Interns

A cost-friendly staffing option is the intern. Look to a local college to find a low or no-cost intern who’s studying a field that you need help in. Once the semester is over, however, you lose your cheap labor. Still, if you like their work, you can always hire them.

Next, Write Your Job Description

Now that you’ve defined the tasks you need your first employee to tackle, organize them into separate jobs.  This is important so that you’re not trying to recruit an amazing admin who not only can file but can also file your taxes, manage your social media, give you a manicure, and run your IT department!. Now, it’s time to organize your thoughts into a job description.

The more detailed your job description, the more likely you will be to find exactly the right fit for the role you need to fill. I like to write down everything that employee could possibly be asked to do so that there are no surprises down the road.

Start Your Search

With that job description, look in as many places as possible to maximize your search. You can (and should) open your job search up to:

  • job boards
  • recruiters
  • social media
  • your network

Let everyone know you’re hiring, since referrals are an excellent source for great employees.

If you’ve spent the time up front to clearly identifying the type of employee you need, you should be rewarded with one who will help you take your business to the next level.


Nextiva Tuesday Tip: Are You Measuring Customer Experience?

4-7 measuring Customer Service smallDon’t look now, but the pressure to provide superior customer service just got even greater. According to new research from eConsultancy, the customer experience is becoming more and more important because products and services are increasingly commoditized. Companies—especially those, like small businesses, that can’t compete on low price alone—are finding customer experience is the best way to differentiate themselves from the competition.

While the report focuses on retail businesses, I believe these three lessons apply to just about any company:

  1. Customers expect consistency. Today’s consumers want their experience with your business to be the same, no matter whether they’re interacting with you in person, on the phone or via email. If your website conveys a lively, fun and lighthearted brand, but your customer service reps are dour and unhelpful on the phone, you’re in big trouble. If your phone reps provide efficient and helpful customer service but your website is clunky and hard to navigate, you’re in trouble, too.
  2. Customers want personalization. Are you using tools such as customer relationship management (CRM) and help desk software to gather, analyze and share customer data? If your customer service reps have quick access to data on a customer’s past behavior, for example, it’s much easier for them to provide personalized service—which creates a bond with the customer and smooths ruffled feathers if there’s a problem. In the long run, a personal approach to customer service helps build lasting relationships with customers, increasing customer loyalty (not to mention your business bank account).
  3. Customer satisfaction is one measure of customer service—but it’s not the only one. While 63 percent of companies measure customer experience based on customer satisfaction surveys, making this the top measure used overall may be a mistake. Customers aren’t always honest or accurate in such polls. Even if they are, you’ll get a more well-rounded picture of how they really feel if you also measure 1) the size and growth of your customer loyalty programs and 2) the percentage of returning customers. (Average order size and total revenue are other measures many companies use to track customer satisfaction, but the report notes these can be misleading, as someone who buys from you today may not come back tomorrow.)

By following these tips, you can boost your service quality—and build your customer loyalty.


Mondays with Mike: 7 Ways To Cut Costs Without Stifling Growth

4-6 Cost Cutting  smallToo often, we discover a new way to reduce our expenditures, only to find out it’s not ultimately good for our bottom line.  The trick is to manage our costs, while still flourishing.  I know – that’s easier to say than do.  But here are seven sure-fire ways to keep your business growing on the cheap.

  1. Pool your resources.  You and other local businesses share many of the same needs.  You need things like ink for your printers, paper towels for the kitchen, and health insurance coverage for your staff.  If you can come together, assess your needs, and approach your providers for these goods and services, you can often negotiate for a better group rate.  Your ink supplier, for example, will likely win some new customers, and you’ll all save money.
  2. Hire contractors.  Take a step back from your staff and assess your real staffing needs.  Often it’s advantageous to hire contractors for certain jobs, paying them a much higher hourly rate, but only using them as needed.  Your staff gets more flexible work days, and you save money in the end.
  3. Free advertising.  So one of your competitors goes out of business, but their billboard on the edge of town is still standing, inviting prospective customers to call their now-out-of-service number.  Call the phone company and arrange to have that old phone number forward to your line.  When the phone rings, you can explain the situation and detail what you’re willing to do to earn that customer’s business.  Why pay for a billboard when you can get one for free?
  4. Cut phone costs.  Most business owners don’t realize how much money they spend annually on their phone services.  Explore lower cost – or even no cost – options like Nextiva.  You may find better call quality and services for far less than you’re paying now.
  5. Assess your office space.  Over the life of your business, you may find that you expand or contract from time to time.  When you’re paying for a space that’s larger than you need, you’re wasting money.  See if sharing a space with another company makes sense, or look for options with shared public areas – kitchens or restrooms.  Make the most of your rent dollars.  Also keep in mind that landlords with space that’s been vacant for a long period of time are far more willing to negotiate rates.
  6. Train your own talent.  Superstar, experienced employees command high wages – no two ways about it.  If you hire raw talent, and take the time to bring your staff up to speed on your own, you can realize huge staffing savings.  Whether you take a chance on an intern or find a diamond in the rough worth taking a chance on, training staff not only saves you money, but also lets your mold your staff to work the way you want.
  7. Get your staff involved.  One of the best moves I ever made was to have a sit-down with my employees and solicit their help in finding ways to trim unnecessary expenses.  They came up with ideas that would never have occurred to me, and when they pitched in, we had a whole team of people working to improve the bottom line.

Cutting costs doesn’t have to be painful.  Finding creative, win-win approaches is the key to making successful, long-term changes without inhibiting your company’s growth. 


A Look At The Omnichannel Retail Customer Experience

4-3 retail experience smallToday’s newest retail customers have come of age lacking the sense of limitations in commerce that their elders have long been forced to accept. They don’t see why commerce needs to take place on one channel to the exclusion of another. They will be sure to Yelp your business a new one if you don’t honor your online pricing in your store (or vice versa), or if you refuse to honor a gift card in your store that someone sent the customer by email.

What they want is what’s called—jargon alert—omnichannel. To put it simply, omnichannel is the future of just about everything that involves extracting money from a customer in a way that they actually enjoy having it extracted.

So what does–should–omnichannel look like? Let’s take a peek.

Meghan Millennial’s Omnichannel Shopping Spree

On a late, bright Thursday morning, Meghan Millennial is walking down a Washington, DC, sidewalk when her phone buzzes, inviting her into an adjacent store for a cupcake in a flavor she’s enjoyed there before. Having just eaten brunch (one of the most important meals of the day), she keeps walking, but mentally files the text for later.

Half a block later, a Patagonia store catches her eye and she steps in. As she enters the foyer, her phone buzzes again with a coupon for 20% off for the next two hours on dresses. Meghan likes the offer and works with a salesperson to find the right dress. However, the store doesn’t have it in her size. No biggie: The salesperson locates it in another store and offers to drop-ship it to Meghan’s house.

But wait! Meghan now wants two of the dresses, and Patagonia’s other location only has one. The salesperson locates one dress in that store and one in a store in Ohio, coordinates the drop-shipping for both, and gives her the BOGO (buy one, get one) discount she deserves (better, after all, than the 20% off that tempted her initially), even though both dresses come from different stores, and neither from the store in which she’s standing.

That afternoon, back at home, Meghan finds that three shoeboxes from Macy’s have arrived. Two of the pairs fit her perfectly; the third is too tight. Needing that third style for the weekend, yet dreading the time it’ll take to hunt for the item in person, Meghan opens Macy’s mobile website on her phone before setting out. She finds the shoes in a better-fitting size and orders them for in-store pickup the next morning, which suits her schedule better than waiting at home.

The pickup is ready when she comes in, and with the proximity functionality on her phone, the store’s employees are able to recognize her arrival, stop folding clothes and other low-value tasks, and hurry to meet Meghan at the front door—handy, since in grand DC tradition, she’s double-parked—where they hand her the package and accept her exchange, wishing her well with an e-coupon to return.

All of the channel-melding that our hypothetical Meghan has just enjoyed can currently be accomplished in retail. It isn’t easy for a business to pull off, but customers want and are starting to expect exactly this. Furthermore, customers have little to no understanding of or sympathy for your difficulties in pulling off omnichannel retailing, even though these difficulties are assuredly significant.

Your inventory systems and databases need to be connected. Your return procedures and order histories need to be synchronized. While none of this is easy to accomplish, it’s easier now than it used to be. Companies like Micros, recently acquired by Oracle, specialize in building systems and technology that allow this coordination: When a customer returns a dress via any channel (ships it back, drops it off in-store, etc.) the merchant’s general ledger is adjusted, order history is appended and inventory is updated. So a phone call or Web interaction, even moments after an in-store return, for example, can be based on up-to-the-minute information.

New technology also offers merchants the opportunity to expand inventory beyond what’s in front of the customer: Small retailers can use systems such as the Lightspeed solution, while larger retailers (such as Macy’s) can use the more elaborate systems that Micros and others offer that provide a “show-and-tell” feature with enhanced-resolution photos from multiple angles. This feature allows a customer, still interacting with a salesperson in-store, to examine in detail items that aren’t found on the showroom floor. This, in effect, expands the store’s inventory without requiring the store to commit valuable real estate. And it puts to bed the perennial frustration customers have after schlepping across town to a store only to learn that the desired item is unavailable in the right size/color/fabric.

When this experience becomes truly seamless, truly centered on the customer and her perspective, you’ve achieved true omnichannel.  And the benefit to you is more than the pleasant experience you’ll be providing your customers, although that’s a big part of it. This approach makes sales seamless and almost invisible to boot, and by removing barriers to buying you will likely spur customers to purchase more. When you lower the barrier to returning items, perhaps a few more items get returned, but again, you increase present and future sales due to greater customer comfort with the returns process. When you lower the barrier to reaching your company through any possible channel, you’ll hear from the customer more—and more often with an open pocketbook.


How Stepping Backwards Can Help Your Business Move Forward

4-2 Step backwards smallMost successful entrepreneurs have lofty end goals and they want to sprint over the goal line right now. This forward vision is essential, but success rarely comes in the form of a perfectly straight upward trajectory.

I use the analogy of physically jumping forward.  If you stand where you are today and just try to jump forward, you may be able to move your body forward by a half a foot or so.  But if you are trying to jump over a small waterway, you move backwards so that you can get a running start and leap forward a great distance.

You need to take the same approach in business.

When your objective seems so close, yet always out-of-reach, try to take a step back. Here are a few suggestions that can help you decide how many steps back you need to take to leap forward toward success.

Do a Partial Re-boot

Sometimes, your business may not be working because you have some of the wrong elements in place.  It could be the wrong product or service mix for your customer base, it could be the wrong staff, or it could be the wrong processes and procedures.  However, you can never fix what’s wrong if you keep doing what you are doing.

Consider shutting down your business for a week or two (or shortening your hours) to formulate a new strategy for your business.  You may have to reduce your SKUs, reduce staff, shut some locations or even go smaller first in order to get to the next level.  Doing what’s not working won’t allow you to grow, so allow yourself to get smaller to have the right foundation to get bigger.

Go Back to School

You may have worked in your field for 20 years, but how much do you really know about running a business? Maybe a lack of business knowledge is stifling your business growth. Or maybe you need to update your skills in particular areas to keep pace with the changes in technology and your industry.

Consider going back to your school days and take a few courses at your local community college. Or consider free training offered by various organizations, such as the Small Business Administration or your local Chamber of Commerce.

Going back to get business basics and new information can allow you to get past your current business roadblocks so that you can grow.

Do a Full Re-boot

Sometimes, business owners have to squarely face reality and shut the business down… for now. If you cannot see any path forward from where you are, maybe you need to consider starting fresh on a smaller scale. Or, it may be time to work for someone else for a while, so that you can learn from the best- and worst- practices of another business without having that financial risk.

When you’re ready to start your business again, you will have fresh knowledge and ideas that can help you move forward successfully.

When your best efforts don’t seem enough to move your business to your ultimate goals, you need to step back. That step may be small or it may be moving back a mile. If that sounds discouraging, Steve Jobs may have said it best: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.”


7 Conversation Starters to Never Use (and What to Say Instead)

Senior male and female executives chatting with city views in backgroundEvery customer relationship starts somewhere. Classic "in person" questions like “so, what do you do?” rarely lead to memorable conversations that can get the small business leaders noticed. Some awkward questions can even lead to making a bad first impression that ends the relationship even before it starts.

Here are 7 conversation starters you should avoid and what to say instead:

1. Did you hit heavy traffic on the way here?

Talking about traffic does not put anyone in a good mood. The lesson here is to not just ask any question. Put some effort into thinking about ones that will start a meaningful conversation that will give a relationship a chance.

Instead try: What inspired you to come here? Find out what they are hoping to get out of the event. Maybe you can help each other out right now!

2. Where do you live?

This question can be too personal when initially meeting.

Instead try: Where are you from originally? followed by What was your favorite part about growing up there? This gets them to start sharing immediately on a deeper level which builds the relationship.

3. How about this weather lately? So much (snow, rain, heat) right?

It doesn’t get any more cliché than this. You don’t want someone thinking “Wow, really? That’s all you’ve got?” This sounds like elevator talk.

Instead try: What are you most excited about for the (Spring, Summer)? Put a twist on the weather question by using it to learn more about someone. This question gives them a chance to talk about upcoming events they’re attending or their favorite hobbies outside of work.

4. How boring is this (speaker, event, job)?

Complaining about anything and negativity in general absolutely ruins a first impression. Even if your statements are valid (and they are thinking the same thing), never start a relationship over a negative. Keep the tone positive.

Instead try: What have you found most helpful in the (speakers presentation, the event, the job)? Asking people to reflect on what they have just heard or experienced and how it will help their business gives insight.

5. I am looking to try a new diet. Do you know of any good ones?

Generally, health topics will make people feel uncomfortable. They make think you are making a statement about their weight or appearance which is dangerous.

Instead try: Im looking for a new book to read. What business books have you read lately? This is a great go-to question for someone without getting too personal.

6. Did you hear about that guy who went to jail for ___?

Just like health topics, creepy topics (criminals, for example) can make people really uncomfortable or can lead to a discussion about politics! (always a topic to avoid).

Instead try: Did you see what happened on the last episode of ___? Television series and pop culture topics are usually a safer bet! Figure out a show you both watch and share what you think about its latest developments.

7. I can't seem to get anything done. I feel like I dont have five minutes for myself. Do you feel that way?

Don’t make people think of their long to-do lists back at the office. Connect in the moment.

Instead try: Im planning to a vacation soon. Do you have any fun trips coming up soon? Most people have a trip on the horizon or will at least enjoy talking about the last one they took. Ask for recommendations for places to travel!

What is your best conversation starter?




 
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