Archive for the ‘Mondays with Mike’ Category


Mondays with Mike: How To Get Your Entire Business Running On The Cloud In One Day

Stocksy_txpe7e51ee740B000_Small_134978A lot of business owners put off making big decisions – like transitioning their company to running on the cloud – because they fear change.  They’re reluctant to undertake a major overhaul because they know that difficulties will arise, and there will be a learning curve for their staff.

 

For the most part, they’re right.  Change is a struggle.  But it’s a struggle worth taking on.  My advice to entrepreneurs considering making the switch to a cloud-based office is to take a deep breath, get a few things in place ahead of time, and dive right in!  If you follow these steps, your transition will be smooth and will put you on the road to flexibility you’ve only dreamed of.  

 

The key to a seamless transition to the cloud is doing your homework and making a workable plan.

 

First, you want to pick your date.  There actually is a very best day for major business transitions – January 1st.  While everyone else in the world is sleeping off a hangover, you have a full day to make you changes and start working out the bugs before the world returns to work.  A new fiscal year makes record keeping easier, and since you’re likely to do little actual business, you’ll be able to focus on your transition.  Working out the kinks on a slow day lets you troubleshoot without the stress of impatient customers.

 

Next, you’ll want to make a list of all the applications and programs you use and sort them into three categories:  apps you use daily, ones you use monthly, and ones that you use occasionally or only for special purposes.  How frequently you use an app will determine exactly how you transition it.

 

For apps you use daily – word processing, phone service, accounting – you’ll ideally want to port all of your information directly – say, from QuickBooks to QuickBoooks Online.  If that’s not an option, you’ll need to find a full replacement.  Keep in mind that any replacement will have differences, and you’ll want to familiarize yourself with those differences ahead of time.  Apps you use monthly can be replaced by cloud-based alternatives, and apps that you use infrequently may not need to be cloud-based at all.  It doesn’t make sense to spend the time and money looking for alternatives for programs that you seldom use.

 

Once you have your cloud-based applications selected, you should select your test users, and I strongly recommend that you don’t rely on your IT people for this task.  You want to get a feel for how the folks who will actually be in the trenches – the ones who will have to use the new tech to do their jobs – will interact with the new programs.  Once your test users are comfortable, you’re ready to roll the cloud out to the rest of the company, using your new experts as support staff.

 

If it’s possible, you should plan to run parallel for a few weeks.  Now I know that running parallel is double the work, but if you have a problem, you’ll be glad you did it.  Keeping the old system up for a brief period ensures that your customers don’t experience any troubles getting the same great service they’re used to.

 

Finally, since your business is now cloud-based, you need to develop an emergency plan – figure out what you’ll do if something goes wrong.  Think I’m overreacting?  When Superstorm Sandy swept through my neck of the woods, I managed to keep my business running from an emergency shelter.  How?  I’d already planned and tested how my office would handle needing to work in less-than-ideal circumstances.  Knowing that if the power goes out you can still do business is key.

 

Is it a lot of work to get your business up and running on the cloud?  You bet!  Is it worth it to get flexibility and increased productivity?  Absolutely.  While making the transition in a day may not be ideal, it is possible, which demonstrates that you shouldn’t be afraid to make the leap.


Mondays with Mike: How To Become A TED Speaker

TED-Talk-WebTED can change your life, and I’m not just talking about the insights you can glean from the brilliant ideas shared by the many speakers. I’m talking about giving a TED talk – one single engagement that will expose you, your ideas, and your brand to millions of people. It’s the biggest public speaking opportunity around, and it ain’t an easy one to land.  

I’ve given a few TEDx talks – the regional feeder program for TED, and I sat down with the curator of TEDx Hoboken, Elizabeth Barry, to get some insight into what the curators are looking for and some strategies that speakers can use to get the opportunity of giving a talk. If your goal is to give a TED talk, TEDx is the logical place to start.  

 

Let’s start with Elizabeth’s list of dos and don’ts for landing a TEDx talk:

 

DO NOT:

  • Pitch yourself or your business. TED and TEDx talks focus on ideas, rather than people.
  • Simply repeat an earlier performance. Find a fresh idea.
  • Think you’re more important than your idea.

DO:

  • Be real and be kind. You’re not the focus of the talk; your idea is.
  • Present an idea that’s original, profound, and genuinely worth spreading.
  • Bring all your passion and expertise.
  • Focus on your idea and its applications in the lives of others.  Your talk should be more than simply a story about your life. Look for an idea that can benefit your audience.

Elizabeth stressed that TED and TEDx aren’t about grandstanding. Sure, the events generate great publicity, but the goal of the project is to spread and profound ideas that make a difference in people’s lives.  

 

Once you’ve landed and given a TEDx talk, you can focus on the big fish. One thing you should keep in mind is that TED was created by a group of journalists, so your best angle is to focus on a compelling story. Additionally, you should consult the editorial calendar to make sure your great idea wasn’t covered by the previous quarter’s talks. 

 

You should absolutely promote the heck out of your TEDx video – since each view is a new (and trackable) impression, but it’s essential that you not simply try to recycle your TEDx content. Don’t lose sight of the fact that it’s your idea that’s the focus. Should you land a TED gig, it’s not simply because you’re so wonderful; it’s because you have something important to share that can enrich the lives of the audience.

 

It’s impossible to overstate how huge a TED talk will be for your career. At the time I wrote this article, 1.2 million viewers had watched a TED talk given by a young man named Cesar Kuriyama. He stood on the stage and shared the insight he’d gained from his project in which he recorded one second of video every day and edited the clips into a video that captures the absolutely ordinary images that comprise our lives. The power of his talk was in the weight of the impressions that fill our lives … the ones that we too often take for granted and forget as soon as we’ve seen them.  

 

Kuriyama shared his experience of image and memory and the complex ways that we recall the events of our lives, both good and bad. Not only has he gained astounding publicity for his projects, but he’s also touched 1.2 million people with his idea worth sharing. That’s the power of TED. It’s a worthy goal.


Mondays with Mike: What The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Can Teach You About Marketing

Your mother, your brother, your best friend, and a loooong list of celebrities, and me too: everyone jumped on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, posting videos of themselves, donating money, and challenging their friends and family to do the same.  Those who participated got their fifteen minutes of fame, and those who wimped out were ridiculed as being no fun.

Aside from the fact that the Challenge raised millions of dollars and promoted awareness about ALS, a terrible, degenerative disease, the Ice Bucket Challenge is a remarkable example of the tremendous power of social media, and it illustrates what can happen when you invite your customers to share pics, videos, and messages that promote your brand.  There are several important principles that the Ice Bucket Challenge teaches us about developing a winning social media marketing strategy. 

  1. Be the EST.  While Challenge videos that simply featured calls out to a couple of friends followed by a typical soaking didn’t circulate terribly far, videos of particularly creative approaches were shared thousands and thousands of times.  FunniEST, coldEST, wettEST … extreme examples got the most views.  Whether it was Ben Affleck calling out his celebrity pals and then pushing his wife into their swimming pool, or whether it was a group of middle aged moms rapping their challenge, standing out from the crowd is what gets the most mileage.  Invite the participants in your social media campaign to interact in creative ways.  Ask them to give you their EST.
  2. Find something ubiquitous.  Everyone could participate in the Ice Bucket Challenge, because all that’s required is water, ice, and some sort of container.  If the components had been caviar, platinum, and moon rocks, then that would have left most of us out.  Invite your fans to tweet, photograph, and share pics of themselves in your place of business, or wearing your logo.  Make it simple, repeatable, and leave room for creativity.
  3. Recognize the emotional power of social media.  There was some criticism of the Ice Bucket Challenge from folks who thought it trivialized the disease.  Some of the most powerful videos posted and shared were those made by people who suffer from ALS and from their friends and families.  Authenticity shines through in a video, and creating a powerful emotional connection with your brand through your customers’ true stories promotes your brand in a positive way.
  4. Be pictorial or easy to replicate.  Maybe you invite your fans to take your logo on vacation with them and share pics of your logo in exotic places.  Or perhaps you give away bumper stickers and ask customers to take pics of their cars in unusual spots.  The key is to make it easy to incorporate your logo into a photo that can be shared and reshared until the image covers the globe. 

Creative images make millions of impressions via social media.  You invite the participation of your customers, and while you will need to monitor and perhaps to edit content to ensure that it’s appropriate, the beauty of a social media campaign is that you can sit back and let your fans do your marketing for you. 

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Mondays with Mike: The 4 Crazy Ways To Advertise With Mobile Technology

Consumers are absolutely besieged by images, messages, and impressions.  Every time we turn on our phones, computers, televisions, e-readers, or radios, we’re inundated by advertising and information.  Given the overload that we experience, it’s often the most outrageous messages that hit their mark. 

If you’re looking to boost the number of impressions you make, one of the very best ways to do it is via social media. Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and Instagram touch more users more times per day than we can really wrap our heads around.  That’s a lot of potential impressions, but you have to do something novel to really capture the attention of potential customers.  If you’re determined to make a splash, here are some ideas to get your started. 

  1. Invite users to submit videos or pics with your product or logo.  Think people won’t take the time to make and upload a video?  Think again!  Look at the thousands and thousands of ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos filling up your newsfeed on Facebook.  The videos of folks dumping ice water over their heads – sometimes in very creative ways – demonstrate the power of the novelty video.  Someone makes a video, shares it, and it spreads, increasing exponentially to reach more users every day.  The best way to adapt this photo/video idea for business is to run a contest:  Invite customers to post pics of themselves wearing a hat or t-shirt with your logo while they’re on vacation or in an unusual spot.  The photo that gets the most likes or shares wins a prize.  Think about the potential here – you’re going to be making thousands of impressions and building fans for life.  Powerful stuff.
  2. Pop-up advertising.  We become completely immune to things we see or hear day after day.  When the same old ad comes on my Pandora radio, I completely tune it out.  It’s like I don’t even hear it.  Novelty is king, and that’s why pop-up advertising is so effective.  Whether you turn your pizza shop delivery vehicle into a giant slice of pizza or whether you hire a clown who walks on five foot tall stilts to entertain folks in the parking lot on a busy Saturday, the real secret to pop-up advertising is that random people will take pics and share them with their friends.  Your little attention-getting stunt will continue to make its way around social media long after your part is finished.
  3. 2014-08-25_1635Flash mobs.  More labor intensive than some other techniques, the surprise and wonder factor here is huge.  You coordinate a number of people to perform in public, making sure you get good quality video of the event, and you post the video online.  Again, like the other social media techniques, the power isn’t in the initial views.  While the folks who happen to be on the street or mall when you perform will certainly be surprised and enjoy the event, the real numbers come when the video is shared over and over, resulting in tens, or even hundreds of thousands of impressions.
  4. Work lightning fast.  Twitter is particularly useful for brief messages that are timely and relevant to rapidly developing current events.  One of my favorite examples was the Oreo hashtag during the Superbowl when the lights in the stadium abruptly went out.  “You can still dunk in the dark” was the tagline of the ad that appeared on Twitter just seconds into the blackout.  The ad was retweeted countless times, and Oreo was declared the winner of the Marketing Superbowl.  You need a smart, witty social media guru on your payroll in order to take advantage of current events opportunities, but it can be worth every penny you pay.  Seize the moment!

Key to all of these social media strategies is the fact that by getting consumers involved with spreading the word about your brand, you’re transforming them into your biggest fans.  Social media works because everyone wants their fifteen minutes of fame, and there’s no reason while they can’t have that fifteen minutes while wearing your logo and creating millions of brand impressions. 


Mondays with Mike: The 8 Female Values Every Male Leader Needs

Stocksy_txpc96af066We9000_Small_285956I’ve been fortunate enough to work with some spectacularly smart and strong women throughout my career, and I’m frequently reminded of the values that these women have displayed – things I’m working hard to implement in my own business.  Whether you believe that gender differences are the result of nature or of nurture, don’t miss out on the lessons you can learn from successful women.

  1. Self-worth derives from community service.  Some men tend to be trophy hunters – racking up accomplishments and money in an attempt to demonstrate their value to the world.  Women tend to see their relationship to their community – and the vital ways in which they are connected to their community – as the hallmark of success.  Keeping in mind that we are part of our community and that it is our interconnectedness that makes and keeps us relevant and necessary can help us focus on strengthening ties rather than creating distance.
  2. Presentation matters.  Women have been judged by their appearances to a much greater degree than men have, and it’s worth remembering that we only get one chance to make a first impression.  Make sure that you present yourself as organized, neat, and capable … every time.  And hey – stylish doesn’t hurt either!
  3. Balance work and home.  While no one gets it perfect every day, women tend to make the effort to flourish in their careers, while still making time to spend time with their families.  It’s important to maintain the vital support of our home lives – the support that will actually help us succeed in business.  Don’t devote all of your time to your career at the expense of your partner and your family.
  4. Tolerate pain.  Running a successful business is hard work – much like the labor that precedes a delivery.  Women are masters as gritting their teeth, settling in for the long haul, and getting the job done.  Growing a business is a struggle, and it’s never painless.  Entrepreneurs can’t afford to be wimps!
  5. Multitask.  Women tend to be much more adept than men at juggling multiple tasks efficiently.  While there is something to be said for a single-minded focus, sometimes concentrating on just one task is a luxury we don’t have.  When you’re faced with many things all competing for your attention, observe some women working on multiple tasks and see if you can improve your multitasking abilities.
  6. Ask for help.  We joke about the man who will drive around forever and never stop to ask for directions, but the joke hits close to home for some men.  Realizing that you’re not an expert in everything and that asking for help is actually a sign of strength lets you avail yourself of the expertise that’s all around you.  You don’t have to be the best at every task that keeps your business running, and asking employees or mentors for advice or assistance shows your confidence in them.
  7. Use social skills.  Women are master networkers.  They use their ties to the community as a powerful asset, and nurturing those connections will put you in contact with more clients and more collaborators.
  8. Collaborate.  As fields become increasingly specialized, we’re going to find more tasks that require us to collaborate with other experts.  If you’re focused on producing the very best products and services, that goal will nearly always be more easily achieved by collaboration.  Look around you for folks who can make you better.

In listing these values that I’ve seen in so many successful women, I’m not guy-bashing.  I work hard to keep an open mind about techniques for improving my abilities to run my businesses, and I’ve learned that success had no gender.  It’s available to us all.


Mondays with Mike: 5 Tips For Finding Prospects On Twitter

Twitter

I’ll admit it.  I thought Twitter was a silly little fad when I first learned about it.  Seriously – how much effect can 140 characters have?  It turns out that it’s a massively powerful medium, and I wish I’d started using it earlier.  It can be a goldmine in terms of establishing relationships with existing and prospective customers.  Here’s how you do it:

  1. Search for your company name.  This sounds like a no-brainer, but it’s so essential!  This first key step lets you know who’s talking about you … and what they’re saying.  You’ll know right away if there’s a problem you hadn’t heard about, and you’ll get a read on the public’s impression of your company.  The folks who are already tweeting about you are the first ones you should make contact with.  In addition to alerting you to problems folks may be having, Twitter gives you a real-time means of responding to criticism in professional and productive ways, establishing your business as a stand-up organization that cares about its clients.
  2. Search for your competitors.  Not only is it just good business practice to know what the other guy is up to, but monitoring the chatter about your competition can also give you priceless inside information into problems or challenges your competitor is facing.  If you learn that customers are upset that the pizza shop down the road discontinued a particular entrée, you may want to advertise that you’re adding a new menu item (which, coincidentally, is what consumers are begging for!)  Unscripted, candid feedback on the other guy’s business may give you ideas about new products or tip you off about mistakes you should avoid making. 
  3. Search for relevant keywords.  Information is power, and knowing what terms people are using to search for services and products like yours is so important.  You can use the information to load your messages up with the right keywords, and you’ll discover links to articles and discussions in your industry that you might never have seen.  Everything you uncover can help you tweak your message and be more sure of reaching the right people.
  4. Use an autoresponder.  Twitter works because it’s instantaneously interactive, and if your Twitter followers don’t get that play from you, they’ll lose interest.  You should thank new followers (automatically,) and using an autoresponder even lets you create and send messages even if you’re taking the day off to go fishing with your kids. 
  5. Produce relevant content.  If your tweets are boring, repetitive, or irrelevant, then you’re going to lose followers as soon as you get them.  Armed with the competitor’s information and the relevant keywords, you’re prepped to start creating useful articles that your followers will actually read and use.  Even though each tweet has a maximum of 140 characters, you can send the link to your content.  Giving your customers useful tips and suggestions that relate to your industry can win you loyal customers for life.

Twitter is so much more than selfies.  It’s a more powerful medium than I ever though it could be, and harnessing that power gives you far-reaching access to millions of potential customers.    


Mondays with Mike: How To Prep Your Business For Sale In 90 Days (Or Less!)

I know a thing or two about selling businesses.  I’ve done it both hard way, and the easy way, and it’s not hard to figure out which way I prefer.  Even if you plan on turning your company into a legacy that your children will run after you’re gone, the best time to get your business ready to sell is today!  Before you ever want or need to sell your business – that’s when you should start.  Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Identify strategic buyers.  Strategic buyers are those who want your business for some reason other than just your company’s revenue.  They may want your customers, your intellectual property, or even your employees.  If you can identify these buyers, you can learn which of your assets are most desirable – and you can protect them.
  2. Resolve any legal troubles.  Buyers won’t want to touch a business that has lawsuits or liens against it, so you need to clear up any old business and get your company in the clear. 
  3. ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Focus on profitability, rather than debt.  Businesses are often valued by a multiple of their profit, so you’re better off directing extra revenue toward measures that make you more profitable.  Paying down debt with your extra money doesn’t add nearly as much to your value.
  4. Protect your key employees’ positions.  We all have those staff members who are critical to our survival, and it’s smart to make a plan for what you’d do if one of them left.  Whether your discreetly cross-train employees or keep a list of potential new hires, you want to make sure that if one of your key employees leaves, that your business goes on as usual.
  5. Get out of the office.  Not only is your business more valuable if it can run in your absence, but you also need to be out in the marketplace as the face of your company.  You need to continue running your business as if you’re going to hand it down to your children, and that means cementing relationships with important clients and maintaining your market share.  Don’t slack off!
  6. Cut costs.  You’ll boost your selling price if your company is lean, efficient, and profitable.  Make sure you trim unnecessary expenses and eliminate anything that doesn’t directly contribute to the health of your company.
  7. Work with a business broker or investment banker.  You’ll want to make sure your business is ready to sell when you tackle this step, but you’ll often find that brokers have a stable of businesses looking to acquire others.  Not only can you sell your company more quickly, but a broker can also help you get top dollar for it.
  8. Be hard to get.  If you appear to be desperate to sell, your value diminishes.  Cultivate a field of buyers and watch your price go up.  You want buyers to have competition in order to ensure that you get every penny you’re worth.
  9. Keep it quiet.  The news that you’re looking to sell your company can potentially frighten off employees and even deter new clients from signing on with you.  You want your business to continue to grow and flourish … just in case a sale falls through.

The time you spend preparing your business will give you one additional benefit other than just getting you ready to sell, and it’s actually a huge one.  Your business will be healthier.  Much of the advice I’ve listed here is stuff you should be doing anyway – measures that make your business more efficient and profitable, in addition to making it more attractive to buyers.  


Mondays with Mike: How To Vaccinate Your Job Applicants

I’ll start this article with a nod to Dan and Chip Heath, whose book, Decisive, has had an enormous impact on the way I handle making important decisions.  I’ve learned over the years that while sometimes all you can do is trust your gut instinct, there’s a lot to be said for making decisions as deliberately as possible.  The vaccination technique in the hiring process plays the very important role of eliminating a number of the poor options, leaving you with the applicants who are best suited for your position.

Here’s how the vaccination technique works:  Let’s say that you’re hiring for a customer service position.  Before you write your job ad, think back to the problems you’ve had with previous employees in that position and make a list of the parts of the job that presented the biggest challenges.  Now, include those parts of the job description in the ad.  If it feels like you’re warning people off the job, then you’re doing it right!  Your goal should be to accurately describe the job, warts and all.

Why would you want to focus on the difficult aspects?

Stocksy_txpbfc73dd2sR8000_Small_175628You’re inoculating your applicants.  You’re giving the candidates who don’t want to deal with irate customers’ complaints a reason not to apply.  You’re telling the folks who don’t ever want to work weekends that they’re not going to be happy in the position.  You’re essentially screening out unsuitable folks so you don’t have to waste time interviewing, hiring, training, and ultimately firing them. 

My favorite way to write an ad is as a challenge to just the right candidate.  Emphasize that it’s a very special person you’re looking for, with just the right unique skill set.  People who read your ad and say “That’s me!” are the ones you’re looking for.  They’re dedicated and prepared to face the challenges of being your customer service rep.

In addition to screening out candidates who aren’t a good fit for your job, vaccination also ensures that your applicants know what they’re getting onto.  They won’t legitimately be able to complain that they didn’t know they’d have to work evenings and holidays if you included those details in the ad.  Think about the alternative – you gush about what a great company you’ve built, how wonderful the staff is, and how rewarding the work is – some employees may feel like they’ve been misled when they encounter their first real challenge.  Oversell the difficulties and let them discover for themselves how wonderful your company is.

When you’ve weeded out the unsuitable candidates, what you’re left with is a short list of much better options, and that means that you’ll be able to make a better decision since you’ve taken the time to deliberately sift out the cream of the crop before you even schedule the first interview.  Good decision making is a habit, and eliminating unwise choices is one of the surest ways to improve your long term outcomes and bring on staff who’s in it for the long haul.  


Mondays with Mike: 7 Tips For Making Your Employees Marketing Superstars

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you had a team of enthusiastic marketing superstars who promoted your brand everywhere they went?  Here’s a secret:  You can make it happen!  Consider the fact that every one of your employees interacts with dozens and dozens of people everyday, and you’re missing your opportunity if you don’t enlist them in your mission to promote your brand.  Here are some sure-fire strategies for making your employees part of your marketing strategy:

  1. Speak their language.  Every single member of your staff is motivated in a slightly different way.  Take the time to figure out what’s important to your employees, and you’ll be able to tell your story in a way that matters to them.  If you can sell your staff on your vision, they’ll sell it to your customers.
  2. Create the right climate.  Make sure that your staff understands that you’re not just in business for the bottom line.  Show the ways in which you enrich your community, whether it’s by providing necessary services or through your investment in community programs.  If your staff feels good about the work they’re doing, they’ll share their enthusiasm.
  3. Provide awesome wearables.  The key to this tip is making the wardrobe genuinely cool – something that your staff will actually choose to wear.  Your tagline or logo on a t-shirt becomes a walking billboard.  If you make sure your staff actually likes their company togs, then you’ll be sure that they won’t end up in the trunk of the car, where – let’s face it – they’re not doing you any good.
  4. Use social media.  Whether your run a caption contest or share pics of your staff wearing your logo in interesting locales, make sure you leverage the powerful tool provided by the various social media apps.  Folks love that fifteen minutes of fame – so why not use it?  Turning your brand into one that people have fun sharing increases your visibility and strengthens brand loyalty.
  5. Provide Halloween costumes.  Create a character that suits your company climate and offer your staff the chance to celebrate without having to stress over what to wear.  Whether you create a superhero – think something like Uber Geek if you’re an IT company or Grammar Nazi if you’re a PR firm – you’re injecting a little fun into your corporate image.
  6. Use every opportunity to advertise, no matter how small.  One of my favorite, often overlooked examples of an underused means of getting your company’s name out there is to make sure that your company wi-fi and your employees’ mobile hotspots are all branded with your company’s name.  The next time your sales rep is working and sipping a latte at Starbucks, everyone who logs on to the free wi-fi will see your company’s name.  Never miss a chance to make in impression.
  7. Don’t forget the hardware.  Don’t send your staff out with laptops that advertise for Apple; slap your awesome logo on everything that sits still long enough.  Your staff can make countless impressions just by toting gear that advertises for you.

Be open, and be creative!  Brands are built one impression at a time, and you have more opportunities than you realize.




 
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