Archive for the ‘Mondays with Mike’ Category


Mondays with Mike: Why Pivoting Can Kill Your Business

11-17 stop sign small

If you’re anything like me, you’re perpetually trying to improve your business.  I read a lot of material produced by other entrepreneurs to make sure I stay on top of trends and the most current research that can help me be a better business owner.  My companies are my babies, and I want to be a good parent.

We have to be wary consumers of entrepreneurial advice, though, and there’s one trend that is particularly troubling to me because it eats away at the core reasons you and I had for starting our companies in the first place.  Pivoting can be lethal to your business, and here’s why.

Pivoting, explained simply, is finding out what your customers want and altering your product until you satisfy your customers.  Now in theory, trying to please your customers doesn’t sound like a bad thing, right?  Here’s the problem, though:  assuming that you started your business because you had a philosophy and a product that you believed in, pivoting can end up being nothing more than incremental steps that carry you further and further from your vision.

In fact, not only can pivoting move you away from your vision, but it can also do real harm to your bottom line. 

I’ll share a story that illustrates how dangerous pivoting can be:  When I wrote my first book, The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur, I thought I knew exactly who my target audience was.  I was absolutely certain that my readers would be male, recent college graduates.  I’d created marketing plans with that reader in mind, and I was shocked when I didn’t see immediate sales to my expected demographic.  I’d missed my mark, and for whatever reason, my book wasn’t selling as well as I’d hoped … at least not to the people I thought it would.

As it turned out – before I could revise the book and re-release it, hoping to get the readers I’d hoped for – I discovered my book did have a market – a really good one.  It just wasn’t what I expected.  I was shocked when I started getting feedback from middle aged women who were telling me how valuable they’d found my insights.  I did have natural readership – one who identified with and valued my methods – and if I’d revised my book to chase after another set of readers, I’d have lost the ones I had.  Had I pivoted … altered my product … I’d have missed out on the customer that already existed – for the product I really believed in.

So pivoting can not only mean that you’ll miss out on the natural customers who want what you’re producing, but there’s also a principle at the core of pivoting that’s a problem.  You’ll see advice about producing a minimum viable product (MVP) to test market customer reception.  The problem with MVPs is that they’re necessarily watered down, poorer quality offerings than what you’d produce if you were really going all in with a product launch.  It’s my position that if you’re truly invested in a product you believe is a unique, high quality offering, then you’ll find your customers.  Putting out a lousy representation in order to test the waters will ultimately damage your brand and dilute the effect you’re trying to create in the marketplace.

My advice when it comes to pivoting – or any other entrepreneurial trend – is to remember why you started your business in the first place.  Any trend or new concept that moves you away from your vision for your company deserves closer scrutiny and a skeptical eye.  Finding your authentic customers and then earning and keeping their confidence is a much sounder course than shifting your direction in search of an easier road.


Mondays with Mike: 9 Unique Ways To Use The Cloud

11-10 Business in the cloud smallI was an early adopter of the cloud for my business, simply because I need to be able to work, collaborate, and stay in contact with my staff and clients regardless of where I am.  I’ve become a cheerleader for the cloud because of the unprecedented flexibility I’ve grown accustomed to.  Thinking about converting your business to the cloud?  Wondering how it can benefit your company?  Read on for nine unique ways the cloud can boost your business.

  1. Bids and proposals.  Though having all of your apps on the cloud lets you work while you travel, sometimes it’s just impossible to make an important presentation in person.  One of my favorite remedies is to create a dedicated web page for a particular prospective client and review it – including editing the page – while I’m on the phone or a video call with the client.  It’s the next best thing to being there in person, and it’s incredibly efficient to end a meeting with a document containing everything you’ve negotiated.
  2. Video.  I’m not talking about cute cat videos, here.  I’m talking about high quality videos that let you reach out and create detailed, specific impressions on prospective clients.  Don’t get caught in the YouTube or Vimeo trap.  There are other players like LongTail Video that will let you create infinitely customizable, slick, professional videos that show off your company’s unique offerings.
  3. Printing and scanning.  Your sales rep takes an order, sends the packing slip to the printer in the warehouse and the invoice to the printer in the billing department.  Can’t get more efficient than instant order processing and billing facilitated by cloud-based apps in real time.
  4. Capturing your thoughts.  Evernote is a classic app for recording notes, pics, links, music – anything you don’t want to forget.  Another new fave of mine is Writer by Big Huge Labs.  It gives me a distraction-free interface that’s perfect when I’m working on a chapter in my latest book or when I’m jotting down article ideas. 
  5. Phone systems.  Using a Private Box Exchange system lets me and my staff route our calls from our office extensions to our mobile phones.  That way when a client calls my New Jersey office, the call reaches me instantly, no matter where in the world I am.  It’s invisible tech that lets my clients reach me reliably, whether I’m in Italy or Istanbul.
  6. Tech support.  Gone are the days when you have to physically hand over your laptop to your IT support person.  Now, regardless of my physical location, our virtual network lets me give my tech guy access to fix any problems that arise while I’m out in the field. 
  7. Music storage and access.  I’ll admit that this use is more personal, but having access to virtually any song ever written makes travel so much more pleasant.  Whether you use Google Music’s free service or whether you’re a paid subscriber to Pandora, it’s never been easier to access great music from anywhere on the planet.
  8. Language translation.  As more business is done internationally, the need for reliable, convenient translation apps grows.  The abundance and improving quality of both paid and free translation apps means that you can reach more customers than ever.Real world navigation.  Whether you use a separate device or one of the many smartphone apps, getting to where you need to be has never been easier.  My favorite recent development – integration of Waze (crowdsourced, real-time traffic information) with Google maps.  Now you can get your route, complete with detailed, audible directions and you get Waze’s notifications about road hazards, police presence, and traffic reports.

Every day brings another reason to convert your business to the cloud and free yourself to reach more clients, work more efficiently, and operate more cost effectively.


Mondays with Mike: 6 Creative Ways To Make Sales Internationally (Even If You Think You Can’t)

11-3 International competition smallAs the marketplace expands to cover more and more of the globe, you’re going to realize your competition may not just be the guy across the street.  It might be a guy in Mexico or China.  The big difference in having competition in another country is that you can’t simply focus on defensive measures to preserve your business.  You must start thinking about offense – what you can do to increase your market share by expanding your client base.

Say you own a little pizza shop.  Now I’m not going to pretend that it’s a good idea to figure out ways to deliver pizzas to China, but what I am telling you is that you can find a way to market yourself overseas.  Here’s how you can make it work:

  1. Convert your offering to information.  Pizzas don’t travel well, but books and videos do!  Whether you create a series of videos sharing your tips and secrets on running a small business, or whether you create a recipe book based on your Italian grandmother’s recipes, one of the best ways to cultivate business all over the globe is by creating a unique product that’s easily marketable online.
  2. Embrace the power of Skype.  While you may not be able to shake the hands of the folks buying your new recipe book in other countries, what you can do is have a small bookshop conduct a Q&A Skype session for the people buying your book.  You can use Skype to meet your fans and give them a personal connection to you and your brand.
  3. Leverage your culture.  The US has cultural capital, and there’s no reason not to cash in on it!  Establish yourself as a uniquely American business (with a plan that will work in other countries as well.)  If you’re selling your business model and sharing coaching tips, you can even promote cross-cultural awareness by encouraging your new international contacts to share the difficulties and successes they face in other countries.
  4. Play up the pen pal effect.  So you’re helping other businesses get on their feet … why not send them a little piece of your home country?  Receiving fun mail is increasingly uncommon.  Just think about how excited your international customers would be to get a handwritten letter from you.  Whether you reach out to bookstores selling your wares, or whether you ship a personalized thank you to people working on establishing a business that’s modeled after yours, your contact will make your brand memorable.
  5. Find a way to handle other currencies.  Whether you use PayPal or one of the other services that facilitates money transfers among different currencies, make sure you’re prepped so pesos and euros don’t keep you from completing sales.  Being able to work with other currencies lets you reach far more clients.
  6. Establish a local presence.  Once you get a foothold in another country, it’s important to signal your appreciation for and dedication to that business.  Whether you schedule personal appearances or establish a local bank account, consider getting more deeply involved in those communities who support your business.

It’s a big old world out there, and there are more potential customers every day.  Think big.  Think global.  Find some way to package your business for an international audience, and you’ll reap the benefits.


Mondays with Mike: The 5 Cloud Mistakes That Will Cost You Big-Time

10-27 Business in the cloud smallI’m a cloud evangelist.  I work out of my backpack, and running my business on the could lets me work from anywhere on the planet, all while providing the highest level of customer service.  While I’m a huge fan of the cloud, I also know some folks who have underestimated the cost of converting their companies to run on the cloud.  Here are some things to avoid if you’re looking to make the leap.

  1. Thinking the cloud is free.  Sure, you may be able to find a music service that gives you access to your tunes at no charge, but if you’re looking for full functionality – the ability to collaborate, buy, sell, communicate, and store data on the cloud, you’re going to have to pay for it.  Even the simple problem of data storage may end up costing you more if you use the cloud, rather than hardware, but in exchange for the higher fee, you get the ability to access your data from anywhere.  It’s important that you accurately assess fees before you dive in, though.  Monthly subscriptions for cloud storage can add up, so you need to do your homework.
  2. Stopping at storage.  Data storage is what most folks think of when they contemplate uses for the cloud, but what many people forget is that simply storing the data doesn’t go far enough.  You may need data analysis.  You may need credit card processing.  You may need automatic backups.  Each service you add raises your prices each month.  Make sure you account for everything you’ll need.
  3. Thinking there’s one cloud.  It’s a big sky full of lots of clouds.  You may use Nextiva for your communication needs, while your accounting may be handled by QuickBooks.  Those are separate clouds, and they don’t necessarily work easily together.  Finding fixes when you need to move data from one cloud to another can be costly.  Think about it – the slide show you create on Google Drive doesn’t necessarily port perfectly to PowerPoint.  You have to find workarounds, and those cost time and money.
  4. Assuming all your apps will work on the cloud.  Quite simply, they won’t – though more do each day.  If you’re wedded to a particular accounting program or to a specific phone system, you may have trouble converting your apps to the cloud.  There are fixes – PC Anywhere and My Cloud Anywhere can help with the conversion, but you’re going to have to pay for their services.
  5. Getting locked in.  The more customized your cloud configuration is, the harder it will be to move data from cloud to cloud.  Proprietary coding and formatting differences can make it a nightmare to work among a variety of apps.  Your best bet is to be agnostic – minimize your attachment to any one proprietary system – and you’ll find it easier to move from one app to the next with a minimum of difficulty and expense.

Yes, the cloud costs money.  And yes, it can be a hassle to navigate all of the options and functionality.  But is it worth it?  Absolutely!  The ability to collaborate at a distance, maintain communication regardless of location, and exceed customer expectations from anywhere on the globe is absolutely worth it.  


Mondays with Mike: 4 Marketing Fails And What You Can Learn From Them

Some marketing campaigns are more successful than others.  You might be unhappy with an ad that leaves consumers scratching their heads or that doesn’t make your product very memorable.  You may want to take a big chance – roll the dice on a new campaign that will cement your place in consumers’ minds and hearts.  As we are bombarded by more and more images, slogans, and ads, companies are having to be increasingly creative in making a lasting impression.  

 

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Be careful, though!  It’s possible not to just miss the mark, but to miss the target altogether and end up with a full-blown marketing catastrophe.  Here are a few ways in which marketing can be a huge flop – and more importantly, what you can learn from the failures of others.

  1. Unintended Consequences.  How certain was Todd Davis, CEO of Lifelock, that his company could protect the financial security and identities of its users?  Certain enough that he posted his social security number on the company’s website and even on billboards.  How big was the fail?  By last count, Davis’ identity has been stolen at least thirteen times, and to add insult to injury, the Federal Trade Commission even fined Lifelock $12 million for making false claims in its advertising.  Takeaway:  Think your ad campaign through.  Don’t set yourself up by failing to anticipate the logical outcome of your marketing strategy.
  2. Underestimated Cost.  In the early 1990s, Pepsi developed a marketing campaign designed to boost its flagging sales in the Philippines.  They printed numbers on the underside of bottle caps and ran a contest, promising to award 1 million Philippine pesos to the lucky winner with the winning number.  An error in the number selection process resulted in the wrong winning number being announced – a number that had been printed on 800,000 bottle caps.  A contest that was intended to have a $2 million in payouts ended up costing Pepsi over $10 million in legal fees and restitution.  The moral:  Run the numbers, and then run them again.  Make sure you’ve accounted for all of the costs of your campaign, even if it doesn’t go the way you’ve planned.
  3. Inability To Control Content.  Making the most of social media means that companies have to react lightning quick to comments from users who expect interaction.  The trouble, though, is that when comments are live and public, you can end up with some embarrassing or inappropriate messages on your company’s page.  Take Qantas Airlines as an example.  Despite the fact that they’d grounded their flights due to a contract dispute, they introduced a campaign inviting customers to share their dream flight experiences.  The hashtag #QantasLuxury was quickly coopted by frustrated fliers who were trying to get to a funeral or home to a pregnant partner about to deliver.  If you invite the public to participate, make sure you can control the content.
  4. Unintentionally offensive.  Motherhood – the sacred institution.  It’s associated with love, warmth, caring, and … housework?  Mr. Clean’s Mother’s Day advertisement prompted women with a catchy encouragement: “This Mother’s Day, get back to the job that really matters.”  The photo of a woman cleaning pressed all the wrong buttons with many consumers.  Make sure that the message you’re sending isn’t going to inadvertently piss your customers off.  Do a little test marketing!

It’s the splashiest, most outrageous marketing campaigns that garner the most attention.  Fortune does indeed favor the bold, but you need to ensure that your advertisements don’t end up costing you business.  Learn from the mistakes of others.

 

 

 


Mondays with Mike: How To Get Your Entire Business Running On The Cloud In One Day

Stocksy_txpe7e51ee740B000_Small_134978A lot of business owners put off making big decisions – like transitioning their company to running on the cloud – because they fear change.  They’re reluctant to undertake a major overhaul because they know that difficulties will arise, and there will be a learning curve for their staff.

 

For the most part, they’re right.  Change is a struggle.  But it’s a struggle worth taking on.  My advice to entrepreneurs considering making the switch to a cloud-based office is to take a deep breath, get a few things in place ahead of time, and dive right in!  If you follow these steps, your transition will be smooth and will put you on the road to flexibility you’ve only dreamed of.  

 

The key to a seamless transition to the cloud is doing your homework and making a workable plan.

 

First, you want to pick your date.  There actually is a very best day for major business transitions – January 1st.  While everyone else in the world is sleeping off a hangover, you have a full day to make you changes and start working out the bugs before the world returns to work.  A new fiscal year makes record keeping easier, and since you’re likely to do little actual business, you’ll be able to focus on your transition.  Working out the kinks on a slow day lets you troubleshoot without the stress of impatient customers.

 

Next, you’ll want to make a list of all the applications and programs you use and sort them into three categories:  apps you use daily, ones you use monthly, and ones that you use occasionally or only for special purposes.  How frequently you use an app will determine exactly how you transition it.

 

For apps you use daily – word processing, phone service, accounting – you’ll ideally want to port all of your information directly – say, from QuickBooks to QuickBoooks Online.  If that’s not an option, you’ll need to find a full replacement.  Keep in mind that any replacement will have differences, and you’ll want to familiarize yourself with those differences ahead of time.  Apps you use monthly can be replaced by cloud-based alternatives, and apps that you use infrequently may not need to be cloud-based at all.  It doesn’t make sense to spend the time and money looking for alternatives for programs that you seldom use.

 

Once you have your cloud-based applications selected, you should select your test users, and I strongly recommend that you don’t rely on your IT people for this task.  You want to get a feel for how the folks who will actually be in the trenches – the ones who will have to use the new tech to do their jobs – will interact with the new programs.  Once your test users are comfortable, you’re ready to roll the cloud out to the rest of the company, using your new experts as support staff.

 

If it’s possible, you should plan to run parallel for a few weeks.  Now I know that running parallel is double the work, but if you have a problem, you’ll be glad you did it.  Keeping the old system up for a brief period ensures that your customers don’t experience any troubles getting the same great service they’re used to.

 

Finally, since your business is now cloud-based, you need to develop an emergency plan – figure out what you’ll do if something goes wrong.  Think I’m overreacting?  When Superstorm Sandy swept through my neck of the woods, I managed to keep my business running from an emergency shelter.  How?  I’d already planned and tested how my office would handle needing to work in less-than-ideal circumstances.  Knowing that if the power goes out you can still do business is key.

 

Is it a lot of work to get your business up and running on the cloud?  You bet!  Is it worth it to get flexibility and increased productivity?  Absolutely.  While making the transition in a day may not be ideal, it is possible, which demonstrates that you shouldn’t be afraid to make the leap.


Mondays with Mike: How To Become A TED Speaker

TED-Talk-WebTED can change your life, and I’m not just talking about the insights you can glean from the brilliant ideas shared by the many speakers. I’m talking about giving a TED talk – one single engagement that will expose you, your ideas, and your brand to millions of people. It’s the biggest public speaking opportunity around, and it ain’t an easy one to land.  

I’ve given a few TEDx talks – the regional feeder program for TED, and I sat down with the curator of TEDx Hoboken, Elizabeth Barry, to get some insight into what the curators are looking for and some strategies that speakers can use to get the opportunity of giving a talk. If your goal is to give a TED talk, TEDx is the logical place to start.  

 

Let’s start with Elizabeth’s list of dos and don’ts for landing a TEDx talk:

 

DO NOT:

  • Pitch yourself or your business. TED and TEDx talks focus on ideas, rather than people.
  • Simply repeat an earlier performance. Find a fresh idea.
  • Think you’re more important than your idea.

DO:

  • Be real and be kind. You’re not the focus of the talk; your idea is.
  • Present an idea that’s original, profound, and genuinely worth spreading.
  • Bring all your passion and expertise.
  • Focus on your idea and its applications in the lives of others.  Your talk should be more than simply a story about your life. Look for an idea that can benefit your audience.

Elizabeth stressed that TED and TEDx aren’t about grandstanding. Sure, the events generate great publicity, but the goal of the project is to spread and profound ideas that make a difference in people’s lives.  

 

Once you’ve landed and given a TEDx talk, you can focus on the big fish. One thing you should keep in mind is that TED was created by a group of journalists, so your best angle is to focus on a compelling story. Additionally, you should consult the editorial calendar to make sure your great idea wasn’t covered by the previous quarter’s talks. 

 

You should absolutely promote the heck out of your TEDx video – since each view is a new (and trackable) impression, but it’s essential that you not simply try to recycle your TEDx content. Don’t lose sight of the fact that it’s your idea that’s the focus. Should you land a TED gig, it’s not simply because you’re so wonderful; it’s because you have something important to share that can enrich the lives of the audience.

 

It’s impossible to overstate how huge a TED talk will be for your career. At the time I wrote this article, 1.2 million viewers had watched a TED talk given by a young man named Cesar Kuriyama. He stood on the stage and shared the insight he’d gained from his project in which he recorded one second of video every day and edited the clips into a video that captures the absolutely ordinary images that comprise our lives. The power of his talk was in the weight of the impressions that fill our lives … the ones that we too often take for granted and forget as soon as we’ve seen them.  

 

Kuriyama shared his experience of image and memory and the complex ways that we recall the events of our lives, both good and bad. Not only has he gained astounding publicity for his projects, but he’s also touched 1.2 million people with his idea worth sharing. That’s the power of TED. It’s a worthy goal.


Mondays with Mike: What The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Can Teach You About Marketing

Your mother, your brother, your best friend, and a loooong list of celebrities, and me too: everyone jumped on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, posting videos of themselves, donating money, and challenging their friends and family to do the same.  Those who participated got their fifteen minutes of fame, and those who wimped out were ridiculed as being no fun.

Aside from the fact that the Challenge raised millions of dollars and promoted awareness about ALS, a terrible, degenerative disease, the Ice Bucket Challenge is a remarkable example of the tremendous power of social media, and it illustrates what can happen when you invite your customers to share pics, videos, and messages that promote your brand.  There are several important principles that the Ice Bucket Challenge teaches us about developing a winning social media marketing strategy. 

  1. Be the EST.  While Challenge videos that simply featured calls out to a couple of friends followed by a typical soaking didn’t circulate terribly far, videos of particularly creative approaches were shared thousands and thousands of times.  FunniEST, coldEST, wettEST … extreme examples got the most views.  Whether it was Ben Affleck calling out his celebrity pals and then pushing his wife into their swimming pool, or whether it was a group of middle aged moms rapping their challenge, standing out from the crowd is what gets the most mileage.  Invite the participants in your social media campaign to interact in creative ways.  Ask them to give you their EST.
  2. Find something ubiquitous.  Everyone could participate in the Ice Bucket Challenge, because all that’s required is water, ice, and some sort of container.  If the components had been caviar, platinum, and moon rocks, then that would have left most of us out.  Invite your fans to tweet, photograph, and share pics of themselves in your place of business, or wearing your logo.  Make it simple, repeatable, and leave room for creativity.
  3. Recognize the emotional power of social media.  There was some criticism of the Ice Bucket Challenge from folks who thought it trivialized the disease.  Some of the most powerful videos posted and shared were those made by people who suffer from ALS and from their friends and families.  Authenticity shines through in a video, and creating a powerful emotional connection with your brand through your customers’ true stories promotes your brand in a positive way.
  4. Be pictorial or easy to replicate.  Maybe you invite your fans to take your logo on vacation with them and share pics of your logo in exotic places.  Or perhaps you give away bumper stickers and ask customers to take pics of their cars in unusual spots.  The key is to make it easy to incorporate your logo into a photo that can be shared and reshared until the image covers the globe. 

Creative images make millions of impressions via social media.  You invite the participation of your customers, and while you will need to monitor and perhaps to edit content to ensure that it’s appropriate, the beauty of a social media campaign is that you can sit back and let your fans do your marketing for you. 

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Mondays with Mike: The 4 Crazy Ways To Advertise With Mobile Technology

Consumers are absolutely besieged by images, messages, and impressions.  Every time we turn on our phones, computers, televisions, e-readers, or radios, we’re inundated by advertising and information.  Given the overload that we experience, it’s often the most outrageous messages that hit their mark. 

If you’re looking to boost the number of impressions you make, one of the very best ways to do it is via social media. Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and Instagram touch more users more times per day than we can really wrap our heads around.  That’s a lot of potential impressions, but you have to do something novel to really capture the attention of potential customers.  If you’re determined to make a splash, here are some ideas to get your started. 

  1. Invite users to submit videos or pics with your product or logo.  Think people won’t take the time to make and upload a video?  Think again!  Look at the thousands and thousands of ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos filling up your newsfeed on Facebook.  The videos of folks dumping ice water over their heads – sometimes in very creative ways – demonstrate the power of the novelty video.  Someone makes a video, shares it, and it spreads, increasing exponentially to reach more users every day.  The best way to adapt this photo/video idea for business is to run a contest:  Invite customers to post pics of themselves wearing a hat or t-shirt with your logo while they’re on vacation or in an unusual spot.  The photo that gets the most likes or shares wins a prize.  Think about the potential here – you’re going to be making thousands of impressions and building fans for life.  Powerful stuff.
  2. Pop-up advertising.  We become completely immune to things we see or hear day after day.  When the same old ad comes on my Pandora radio, I completely tune it out.  It’s like I don’t even hear it.  Novelty is king, and that’s why pop-up advertising is so effective.  Whether you turn your pizza shop delivery vehicle into a giant slice of pizza or whether you hire a clown who walks on five foot tall stilts to entertain folks in the parking lot on a busy Saturday, the real secret to pop-up advertising is that random people will take pics and share them with their friends.  Your little attention-getting stunt will continue to make its way around social media long after your part is finished.
  3. 2014-08-25_1635Flash mobs.  More labor intensive than some other techniques, the surprise and wonder factor here is huge.  You coordinate a number of people to perform in public, making sure you get good quality video of the event, and you post the video online.  Again, like the other social media techniques, the power isn’t in the initial views.  While the folks who happen to be on the street or mall when you perform will certainly be surprised and enjoy the event, the real numbers come when the video is shared over and over, resulting in tens, or even hundreds of thousands of impressions.
  4. Work lightning fast.  Twitter is particularly useful for brief messages that are timely and relevant to rapidly developing current events.  One of my favorite examples was the Oreo hashtag during the Superbowl when the lights in the stadium abruptly went out.  “You can still dunk in the dark” was the tagline of the ad that appeared on Twitter just seconds into the blackout.  The ad was retweeted countless times, and Oreo was declared the winner of the Marketing Superbowl.  You need a smart, witty social media guru on your payroll in order to take advantage of current events opportunities, but it can be worth every penny you pay.  Seize the moment!

Key to all of these social media strategies is the fact that by getting consumers involved with spreading the word about your brand, you’re transforming them into your biggest fans.  Social media works because everyone wants their fifteen minutes of fame, and there’s no reason while they can’t have that fifteen minutes while wearing your logo and creating millions of brand impressions. 




 
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